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Full text of "S. F. News Letter (1889)"

D 5007 0501303 1 

California Stale Library 



*- 



CM No. /Ql/^QS) 






Vol. XXXIX 



[ESTABLISHED 1806] 




Number 29. 



BR 



DcvoTto to Twe Leading Interests of California and the Pacifio Coast. 

rt>und on JU (n oil f/«- (coding fir- 
'..'•if civilisation, and />- n rccognizt • > authority <<n 
■, Mining and other Stocks— <ill Pacific Coast Ind 

' ''" News Lkttku long wince attained a front place, 

and ittCOlU 'from b*/ paj»i rtt scattered OVCT tin: 

entire habttableolol 

Uunif its large cirtwhtfton and fnfiuential-poaittonmake 

it particularly useful, 
Printed ' > very Saturday by thr Proprietor. Frederick Marriott, 

Flood Building. Fonrin and Ma San Francisco. Annual 8u6- 

scrintion, including •/ Stalt $ and Canada, ■?",- Fori ion, $g. 

Registered at tl matter, 

SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 1889. 



y&szy 




"N continuation of his letter exposing the 
unfavorable conditions which attach to the 
Mexican Pacific Coast Railroad scheme of 
McWood and his associates, our corres- 
pondent in Mexico says; 

According to the official reports of Mexico 
(Statistics by Garcia Cubas for lSS.^, published 
by the Department of the Interior), the areas 
of the States traversed by the line are repre- 
sented by the following figures: Area of the State of Jalisco. 38,808.14; 
of Sin alba, 36,205.26: of Sonora, 77,502.(10. and Lower California, 59.- 
9-18.08 square miles. The total value of this real estate is estimated 
at $39,233,054. 

The population of the States is: For Jalisco, 983,484; Sinaloa, 201.- 
918; Sonora. 143.924; Lower California, 30,198; representing a total 
of 1,359,524 inhabitants. Nevertheless, from these figures, twenty 
per cent, only can be calculated rationally for Jalisco and Lower 
California as "a maximum, for by a mere glance at the map, which 
displays the project, it will be seen that only a small portion of the 
northwestern part of Jalisco will be able to utilize the influence of the 
projected road, and that almost the whole of Lower California will be 
without the zone of attraction of the same line. Noting, therefore, 
the corrections corresponding to these deductions from the areas, 
value of property and number of inhabitants, the following figures 
result: 

Area— sq. miles. Value. Inhabitants. 

Sinaloa 36,205.20 $4,607,790 201.918 

Sonora 77,502.00 7,223.500 143.924 

Jalisco& LowerCalifornia 11,989.73 5,484,354 202.730 



125,697.59 $17,315,644 548,578 

From these figures it may be calculated whether the quantity of 
traffic that the projected railroad is called upon to handle, can leave 
a margin if not remunerative, at least secure from loss. This, however, 
is not the case; calculating the annual value of the products of the 
real estate situated in the regions described, or in other words the 
interest of said capital at 10 per cent., it gives approximately two 
million dollars, which, added to the fluctuating products of the min- 
ing industry and of the slight manufacturing interests existing in the 
places mentioned, will reach the amount of five million dollars. 

The annual value of exports taken from the official reports of the 
Secretary of Finance of Mexico, shows that in the zone of this coast 
it reaches $5,025,685. of which $5,275,364 comes from the silver coin or 
silver bricks. 

As is well known, Mexico has a commercial balance against her, in- 
asmuch as she exports 20 per cent, less than she imports. Increasing, 
therefore, the foregoing amount, the correlative value of the imports 
will be obtained, or a total of $12,657,791. 

From the above it will be seen that of this sum $5,275,364 is con- 
stricted to the carrying of merchandise of little weight and of little 
volume in relation to its value, and consequently the tonnage of or- 
dinary merchandise in one year will beat the niost300,000 tons, repre- 
senting a value of $7,382,427, which is the difference obtained. With- 
drawing from this tonnage one-third, which is already absorbed by 
the Guaymas Railroad to Nogales, and another third which feeds i he 
local traffic carried on bv wagons or mules and the domestic port 
vessels, the railroad would have 100,000 tons to carry in a year. 

The freightage of this merchandise over the 1,600 mileswill give a 
gross return of $4,800,000, leaving a net return of $1,920,000, deducting 
60 per cent, for running expenses; but, as the interest accrued upon 
the $88,000,000 at 7 per cent, the cost of the road, amounts to $6,160,- 
000, the deficit from the first year will be $4,240,000, or in other words, 
the road would commence operations upon the basis of bankruptcy. 

In the month of April, 1888, Mr. Mathias Romero stated his 
opinions to some of the leading business men at Washington in re- 
gard to the security of foreign capital, and especially American, 
sunk in Mexican railways, whenever the companies be organized. 



opon a solid basis and managed with care; referring to the Central, 

wiii.ii run-- font Mexico t.i Paso del Norte, j"nf to the Mexican 
National (narrow-gauge), which is to foln the Capital <>i M- 
Laredo, said thai tne,v bad been managed with mnch extravagance, 
imi that wiili : >od management would produce returns. During the 
same conference, anil concent rating his attention upon tin- y\ i 
Central, he added during the course o( L885 the gro?s returns of that 
road bad ascended to $3,400 000, Increasing up to one million more In 
the following year. 
Tin 1 statement* of Mr, Romero are always favorably received In 

this OOUntry, and if lie expressed himself in terms so little llutti'Niig, 
and justly so. as the bonds arc quoted at sixty-eight per cent of their 
value, in regard to this road, so carefully organized, and which feeds 
itselt from the principal arteries of the coun*ry, what conception 
ought to be formed by the public of the Utopian Mexican Pacific 
' oast Railroad, and what hope of saving from wreck the capital so 
hastily plunged into the undertaking. 

The answer need not be long sought, and if with BOnie severity, at 
least with much justice, we may affirm that this undertaking would 
be the most daring conceived for the purpose of compromising cap- 
ital, without any guarantee whatever, were it not that in its species 
there is unothet st'll worse, namely, the Lower California Peninsular 
Railroad, the concession for which is now held by the International 
Company, and which it is our intention shortly to analyze. 

We took occasion some weeks past to congratulate the leading 
financial journals of London on the able assistance they have ren- 
dered, from time to time, in checking wild-cat mining schemes. In 
response, Money says : 

It affords us sincere pleasure and gratification to know that our efforts to 
act as a beacon-light to investors are appreciated by our invariably well- 
informed contemporary a the San Francisco News Letter. It is, we repeat, 
gratifying to find that our cxertious, equally with those of our esteemed 
contemporary, the Financial News, to "save from loss" the "many email 
investors throughout the British' Isles," are so well understood. We can 
only say that our mission in the future, as in the past, will be to make a 
" determined stand against scheming adventurers." The commendation of 
our friends " across the sea " will only incite us, as we are confident it will 
our daily contemporary, to continued vigilance in vigorously exposing all 
wildcat schemes. 

The members of the International Company of Lower California, 
tired probably of the useless endeavor to dispose of the whole penin- 
sula, regardless of property rights vested in the original owners of the 
stock, have turned their attention to mining matters, and an ex- 
ploring expedition has been dispatched to examine a report on some 
copper locations near the former Mission of San Fernando, Rosario. 
If the veins under examination prove large and rich enough to satisfy 
the inordinate cupidity of this syndicate, it will be next in order for 
the Mexican Government to grant a concession conveying that section 
of the country for the customary brass farthing and the good will of 
the alien land-grabber. Before they get through, this complacent 
ring of connubiators at the bead of the National affairs will either 
have conceded all Mexico, mining lands, wood, water, and all sources 
of revenue contained within its boundaries, to have and to hold, to 
this International Company and its assigns, or else plunge the coun- 
try into the depths and horrors of another revolution. 

Business in Comstock shares continues light, with steady prices. 
The mines continue to develop well, and several important improve- 
ments are reported in different sections of the lode. The winze in 
Best & Belcher is now down to the 400 level, and prospecting the ore 
body encountered on the 300 level will begin at once. Con. Virginia 
has declared the regular monthly dividend of fifty cents. The Chol- 
lar mill will be tried this week with the new electric motive power, 
and if satisfactory the stamps will fall on Norcross ore. At the South 
End. Confidence has produced during December, to date, $06,683. 
The Justice mill is ready to start up, and work will begin at the same 
time in Silver Hill. The Alta mine continues to show improvement, 
and bullion has been produced during the month valued at over $25,- 
000. Some rich developments have been made in the ground of the 
Occidental and North Occidental companies, and the indications for 
the future in this quarter are considered particularly favorable. In 
the Tuscarora mines, business is still quiet. The concentration is 
now very steady and doing good work. Prices of the leading mines 
were higher during the week. There is nothing doing at present in 
the Qiiijotoas. The Peerless mill is running on ore from the mine, | 
and weekly shipments of bullion continue. The contest for control | 
of the Silver King mine is enlivened by the appearance of other in- I 
terested parties in this city, who have concluded to run the mine 
themselves. 

The first clean-up has been made at the new mill of the Mayflower 
Company, operating in Forrest Hill, Placer county, the returns on a j 
ten days' run amounting to 461 ounces. This is at the rate of $800 | 
per day on what may be termed waste, the channel not yet being en- j 
tered, work at present being confined to driving a gangway under the 
deposit. It is claimed that when operations begin in the face of the 
drift, the returns will exceed $2,000 per day. 

Alexander M. Womble has sued the Rathjebs and Hamilton for a 
commission of $50,000 on the sale of the Union Gold mine of Calaveras 
county. There is another suit of a similar nature pending at present j 
in the State Courts. 

Senator J. P. Jones, before his departure for Washington . concluded 
the purchase of Mr. J. C. Flood's interest in the celebrated Mariposa 
estate. The first payment on account will be made on the 15th inst. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank (limited) has made a statement of its 
assets and liabilities to June 30, 18S8, by which it is shown that its 
cash on hand is $2,049,680.77. its capital stock paid up is $1,501,500, 
and its reserve fund $480,000. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 5, 1889. 



SPARKS. 
V~T1 HERE is a tempest in a tea-pot out on Van Ness avenue; the 
L-J bone of contention is samoevar, and the warfare is between 

the rival hostesses of five o'clock teas. The action is car- 
j. ried on in mansions where the surroundings are luxurious, 

the accessories the most refined, and the seat of battle, the 
table, in both cases gleams with family silver and porcelain, is 
brightened with flowers and is presided over by blond divinities, 
whose object is the same, namely : to have a rattling good time in the 
seclusion of their own homes. To further this good time it is neces- 
sary to entrap as many of the male sex as possible, and monopolize 
their attentions free from the distractions of the ball room or crowd- 
ed cotillion. It is early in the season to prophesy, but the hooks are 
baited with such different tid bits that the natural presumption is, 
that the white house will be left in the lurch if some other attrac- 
tions are not furnished beyond weak Oolong a V Anglais, and the con- 
servative influence of a respectable home atmosphere. She of the 
gray mansion, secure in the knowledge of her bank account, alone in 
her divorced glory, shouts defiance at the proprieties, and is a howl- 
ing success in this direction. Her "at homes" are nothing if not 
masculine, and her weekly receptions are crowded with gentlemen 
who are fairly distracted between the charms of their ashen-blond 
hostess and the attractions of various liquid refreshments lavishly 
displayed on the buffet. Beauty, brass and brandy is a stupid enough 
alliteration, but the combination in real flesh and blood is anything 
but dull, and offers a powerful magnet to the gilded sons of this 
naughty town. This hostess knows her San Francisco down to the 
ground, and though she may be rash and reckless in the trifling mat- 
ters of reputation and deportment, she never forgets that the road to 
man's heart lies through his stomach, and by strict attention to that 
part of her business, she has been enabled to skim the choicest cream 

of clubdom for her teas a la Russe. 

* # * * * 

I often have occasion to go up and down Post street, past that 
Temple of Mammon presided over by the Rev. Dr. Barrows. Con- 
tiguous to the consecrated building is a livery stable, whose cramped 
space necessitates a liberal use of the sidewalk for house-cleaning 
purposes. It is no unusual sight to see vehicles of all descriptions 
lining the pavement in front of the church, and extending well 
around it on the Mason street side, receiving the polishing, scrubbing 
and oiling necessary to their preservation. Now, the delapidated ex- 
terior of this edifice suggests a bit from the Middle Ages, and the in- 
congruity between its air of remoteness and the modern profanity 
and earthly occupation of the hostlers is always a painful shock to 
my sensibilities, and I have had serious thoughts of calling the atten- 
tion of some worthy deacon to the nuisance. Sober second thought 
deters me, however, as the horsey tendencies of the pastor are too 
well known to admit of dispute, and he probably regards with 
friendly eyes the stablemen who encroach on his domain. 

***** 

The rector of this particular church officiated not long since at a 
funeral, whose circumstances were particularly sad, and garbed him- 
self for the occasion in a nondescript suit that struck a happy 
medium between the attire of an ordinary business man and that uf 
a gentlemanly gambler. Black and gray striped trowsers, a navy 
blue Prince Albert coat, navy blue tie. polka-dotted with white, a 
brown overcoat and a derby hat completed the unpriestly dress that 
offered a ludicrous contrast to the perfunctorily grave aspect of the 
wearer. Of course there is no law obliging clergymen to dress differ- 
ently from their fellows, but there are unwritten canons of good 
taste which suggest that when he acts in a ministerial capacity his 
exterior should harmonize with the solemnity of the occasion, and 
give an outward and visible sign of the deference due the dignity of 
the office. The cassock of the Catholic priest and the prescribed coat 
of the Episcopal clergyman may be obnoxious to many for various 
reasons, but they at least possess the merit of decency, and do not 
smite the ungodly with the idea that the man inside them is mas- 
querading before the Lord. Illusion is just as valuable an article in 
which to wrap the pulpit to-day as it was in the Fifteenth Century, 
when the heads of the church were rulers of the civilized world ; even 
those great iconoclasts, Luther and Knox, would scarcely have dared 
to appear before their flocks stripped of all the insignias of holy 

orders. 

***** 

I am moved to wonder if any coals of tire mingled with the 
shower of pleasant things that fell on the French artists who have 
just left us, burdened with kindly wishes and good goid shekels? 
They were received with open hands and hearts, and in view of the 
restriction of playing in a foreign tongue, their reception was gener- 
ous to a degree. Not so that accorded to Mr. Daly when he at- 
tempted the introduction of a new element in the theatrical world of 
Paris and took with him the most talented company of comedians in 
the world. I was in that capital at the time of his first appearance, 
so 1 know whereof I speak, and to tell the truth, he never had a 
French audience in his theatre beyond a few critics and first-nighters, 
who came to mock and stayed to jeer. The American colony turned 
out in force ; the resident or traveling Englishmen went in numbers ; 
but the French— ah, no ; they stayed at home, kept their money and 
read with joy the nasty critiques that scored the talented company 
in every direction. 

The press of Paris were unanimous in denouncing actors and man- 



ager. Scintillations of barbed wit played all over the unfortunate 
strangers, and scathing satire reveled in criticisms of dress, voice and 
gesture, and even ridiculed the mise en scene, the best and costliest in 
Paris; for there is no manager in that city who sets his plays with . 
half the care and elaboration given by Mr. Daly. When the com- 
party left, parting shots were fired after it, and it was more than | 
hinted that no more Yankee barn-stormers were wanted in that part \ 
of the world. No wonder the French ridicule us, and only give us I 
their Judas kisses when our coffers are open to their plundering rin- 
gers. It is human nature in nations as well as individuals to despise 
those whom we use, and we are certainly the best natured and most 
useful time-servers in the world. 

******* 

A lady who is an authority on the feminine toilet tells us that 
fashion's latest caprice takes the form of a crest or coat of arms, 
exquisitely embroidered in gold or silver bullion on the left side of 
the corsage. It is a pretty idea, borrowed from the court dress of 
Charles of Burgundy, and in this day of rococo, gilt and silver trim- 
ming it would be quite in harmony with the picturesque costumes 
and revival of Louis Seize decorations. It is needless to add that the 
fashion will never become common here. The reason is obvious. 
Where are the crests and arms of our four hundred? 

* * * * * 

A certain person whose physical and mental well-being was con- 
siderably disturbed by the publication in this paper of a certain 
article has, we are informed, returned to this city accompan- 
ied with the charming progeny. The return was somewhat unexpected, 
as when the train rattled away with this interesting personage it was 
fervently hoped that the pilgrimage would not end at New York but 
it would be extended unto the utmost boundaries of Europe. But 
such is not the case. San Francisco is again blessed with that 
distressful individual, whose only pleasure in life seems to consist in 
traducing and villifying in the most approved Billingsgate young girls 
who far outshine the females bearing their distinguished patronymic 
in birth and breeding. But then the day of revenge has come, and 
when this awful being wrote to the hostelry which has long been the 
abode for their own rooms, the answer went back that they were en- 
gaged, and not only those particular rooms but every other room in 
the house. It was virtually a polite refusal, which refusal was 
brought about by the congratulations made to each other by the dif- 
ferent guests in the house, when this individual left some few months 
ago for the East. The manager of the hotel learned that it were bet- 
ter to offend one person with a malignant tongue than one hundred 
with silver tongues, and no reputation but where bills were paid on 
demand. 

***** 

When the refusal was received, there was consternation in the 
household, for this eminent family has long boarded at hotels, and it 
is believed that no servants would live with them. Under these con- 
ditions another hotel was looked for, and after some search a quiet 
hostelry on Montgomery street was selected, and there are not 
wanting those who say that " this family have been taken by the war- 
like manager on probation," which, being interpreted, means that if 
they do not offend anybody in the house, then they can remain; 
otherwise they will be asked to take up quarters elsewhere, 
much truth may be in this is not known, other than it is common 
talk, but one thing is certain: this person is having fitted up for the 
accommodation of the family a suite of rooms in a hotel on Mont- 
gomery street, and their family is expected back by the first of the 
new year. 

" Have a go^d lay-out od New Year's, Jim? " " Of course I did. Half a 
dozeu of us had a stunuiag diuuer at the Maisou Riehe. Don't they kuow 
how to do the proper thing, though? " 

Caution— I wish the public to understand that I employ uo aeeuts to ped- 
dle my goods. C. Muller, leading Optician of Pacific Coast, 135 Montgomery. 

THE LEAD ERS OF FASHIOll 

FINE PARIS WRAPS, 

IMPORTED ULSTERS, 

ELEGANT TEA GOWNS, 
MODJESKAS, 

NEWMARKETS, 

JACKETS, JERSEY WAISTS, 
Chidren's Cloaks and Suits, Monkey Furs, etc. 



The Largest Stock, the Latest Styles, and the Best Pitting Cloaks and Suils 
offered on the Coast, and at the Lowest Possible Prices. 

FINE DRESSMAKING TO ORDER A SPECIALTY. 

Packages delivered free of charge in Oakland, Alameda aud Berkeley. 
Telephone S03. 

FRATINGER'S, 
The Leading Cloak and Suit House, 



106 Kearny Street. 



[Nov. 24. 



Jan. 



1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



IN A WORLD OF BLOOM. 
rrn LMOST all women admire Bowers— admire them to buy, to 

/ \ wear and t<> OMt aside .vln-n faded, bat very few, in this 

jr\ matter of fact age. really enjoy the Culture of these exquisite 
-L -L children of the sod, few who are willing to sow the seed, 
watch it grow and feel a passionate delight in seeing each 
tiny leaf and bud unfold. 

There is hardly a limit to the varieties of the rose, this queen of 
flowers, but it is said that three thousand kinds exist, not in full cul- 
tivation, however, for all do not come to perfection. Among the most 
prominent are La France, La Pactole, I, a rerle du Jardin, Niphetos, 
Boursiline, Ueve d'Or, Le i'apagoutiers, Jacuuenot, Mahnuison, La 
Duofaesse, Ooutier. Mine. Marie Henriette, Murcchal Neil, The Bride, 
Gold of Ophir, Kose d'Amour, Bauksia. To itemize the different 
varieties would be superfluous. In New York the German gardeners 
lay claim to the birthplace of the roses, but actually the very finest 
come from the south of France, as seen by their names. The culti- 
vation of the rose in California is an assured success, and it is proven 
that no climate in the world was ever more favorable. South Sau 
Francisco lays claim to the finest rose houses, which cover blocks 
upon blocks of ground, but Oakland, Alameda, Sausalito, San Ra- 
phael. San Mateo and Menlo Park produce the flower in great glory, 
especially the two last named places. 

One of the loveliest yellow roses is the Gold of Ophir, which some 
confound with the Gold of Ophira. The old one is more of the color 
of the " Clair Carnot," and round at top, but this one I speak of is a 
semi-double flower, pale as to the outer leaves, with deep yellow 
petals at the heart, flecked by passionate tones of red, a rose without 
perfection of form, and yet a perfectly exquisite flower, looking like a 
\ovely woman's face with wind-ruflied hair. 

Just at this time one feels most interested in the flower which is 
newer and most seasonable; and what can be handsomer than the 
stately, many-blossomed chrysanthemum in its varied tones of pur- 
ple, yellow, lavender, maroon and white. Proudly and majestically 
the charming blossoms rear their imperial heads, lasting far into the 
chill and gloom of Winter, and being doubly welcome. The chrys- 
anthemum is a native of Japan, and there are 150 varieties, but not 
under cultivation. Acknowledgedly there are somewhere about 12 
varieties in use, though new ones are constantly coming into the 
market. The actual value is not apparent, as this is called a " com- 
mon flower," its usefulness being mainly developed in the arrange- 
ment of home decorations, baskets for the table, tall vases, in which 
it mingles with superb ferns and grasses. In this respect it would be 
difficult to find a more telling flower than the chrysanthemum. 

The violet, though humble, should not be overlooked. Of this 
flower there are four varieties. The Neapolitaine, also called "violeti 
de palm," is a light blue in color, in direct contrast to the Russian 
violet, which is dark and single. Marie Louise is pale lavender, hav- 
ing a heart of white, with a faint blusb of pink overlying and giving 
it warmth. This is the favorite among the four; then there is the 
purely white violet, which, however, is seldom of good color, for its 
close approximation to the ground renders it liable to become spotted, 
and therefore it is little cultivated. The cultivation of the violet is 
mostly in the hands of the Italian gardener on account of cheap 
labor, but the best violets come from the private gardens in the 
neighborhoods of San Mateo and Menlo Park. These rich people 
having land to spare, and wishing to turn still another honest dollar, 
give themselves up to flower culture; that is, their gardeners do. 
" They are harder to deal with than the nursery men," said a florist. 
" If you buy a dozen of anything, they give the dozen; the nursery 
man gives thirteen; also, they charge more for the flowers." 
" Blessed be the thrifty, even if already rich." 

Having contemplated the lowly violet, let us once more look up 
ward in admiration of the stately lily, which gladens us in its mag- 
nificent way by a multiplied variety. Where is there anything more 
elegant in the Kingdom of Flowers than the lily? Tall, fair and 
spotless, like the woman who is the ideal of the poet's dream, the lily 
appears like a vestal in the parterre. First comes the Calla-lilly em- 
blem, well fitted to decorate the churches at Easter-tide, in company 
with the veritable Caster lily, who bends her long, slender white 
throat as if in greeting to the day of resurrection. The lily of St. Jo- 
seph is also looked upon religiously, as if the altar were its appointed 
place, and with these may be classed the exquisite Eucharist Ama- 
zonica called the " Lily of Christ," and the Amazon lily, which grows 
in wild profusion on the borders of the River Amazon, but leaving 
these snowy members of the lily tribe, there are others which claim 
mention. The Japanese lilies in three varieties come to us in glow- 
ing tints — the Rosea, pink; the Auratum, gold, and the Alba, white; 
while there is the Amaryllis, also varied from the Bella Donna (one of 
the tribe) in white and pink garments, and the veritable Amaryllis, 
gorgeous, in scarlet, with wide white bands goring each petal. The 
California lily and the Washingtonian lily take their place as beau- 
ties in the foremost ranks; the latter is a native of Nevada, and the 
wild bulbs are sent to Europe for cultivation. 

The lily of the valley is the lowliest, still the loveliest, of all the 
tribe, the flower immortalized by Shelley, who calls it: 
" The naiad-like lily of the vale, 
Whom love makes so fair and passion so pale." 
Up to the present time it has not been largely cultivated here, but 
is now coming into fashion. In the East this charming flower plays 



a prominent \ art in decoration, and in its full season every girl and 
every dude consider their dress imperfect unless a spray of the odor- 
ous lily is pin ued on breast or buttonhole. 

Axaliae are nio-tly used in home decorations, and in pots, though, 
when they first appear, they are welcomed for baskets, and even 
bouquets, The varieties are many, and there is one peculiar to Placer 
county, where it grows wild. 

The cameliu, which was so fashionable some years ago, and since 
lost its prestige, is once more beaming into favor. The camclia is 
perfect in beauty. To make a camelia last three wires should he in- 
serted in the base of the flower— that is, pushed through and doubled 
over the stem, making six wire supports for the flower. In this way 
it may be used in the hair or as a corsage adornment, but neither 
sprinkle it nor put it in water. There are thirty-six varieties in all 
shades of pink, rote, rose and white and pure white. 

The camelia is a native of Japan ; the first introduced into England 
were by the Earl of Derby and Robert Kitchen, of Booth Hall, Lan- 
cashire. The Earl lost his plant, but that of Mr. Kitchen has now a 
history in English Botany. The plant grew as large as a forest tree, 
and by degrees aspired to such dimensions that a vast glass dome 
was erected over it. Ten thousand flowers ornamented its branches 
at one time. 

The Romneya lole.ri. an indigenous plant of this clime, and the 
crowning glory of Califoruian blooms, is a woody herbacious shrub, 
found in the canons of San Diego and Santa Barbara. The seeds, 
as yet, are immature and unreliable, but the plant multiplies abun- 
dantly from the root. The flower is eminently beautiful, being some- 
what like a large white poppy, with crimpled paper-white petals, a 
large disk of bright-yellow stamens holding the center. The buds 
are like burrs, and round in form. The blossoms are borne on long, 
stately stems, and so tenacious of life that they live a week. The 
plant is a stately and exquisite addition to our flora, growing from 
six to eight feet high. Silver Pen. 

Wife— John, one of my corsets has disappeared again. I'll wager 
that that dressy young chambermaid of ours has got it on. Husband 
— What kind of a corset is it? Wile— One of the latest French im- 
portations. Husband (absently) — Well, I'll make an examination. 

— Philadelphia Transcript. 

H. & H. W. Catherwood's fine old Whiskies are prime favorites with all 
who love a pure article. The trade and private consumers know this fact, 
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KID AND FABRIC GLOVES, 



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AT $1.00 LADIES' 6-BUTTON "FRANCOZ" DOGSKIN, embroidered backs 



AT $1.75, GENTS' 2-BUTTON "REYNIER" KID GLOVES, embroidere backs. 



Packages delivered, free, in Oakland, Alameda and Berkeley. 




111, 113, 11B, 117, 119, 121 POST STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 5, 1889. 




EAR N. L. : There's been lot's o' 
comical stories told about society 
folks 't went so often to the Bald- 
win durin' the Coquelin engage- 
ment, but I think the followin' 
tops 'em all, don't you? It appears 't there 's a lady 'n ber daughter 
way in the middle o' the social swim who spent lots o' time in Paris, 
'n were seen often to the theatre while the French plays was goin' 
on. Ned says 't a certain young man, who poses for bein' a wit, 
asked the daughter what precieuses ridicules meant (playin' off he 
didn't know). When the mother spoke up, anxious, I reckon, to air 
her knowledge, 'n says she: "Why, it means a precious ridiculous 
mess, altogether." Did y' ever! 

Speakin' o' Coquelin, didn't the big blonde 'n the squatty matron 
have a good show at posin' again, you bet; but the good-looking 
J-talian doctor didn't act 's a focus for the op'ra glasses o' the colony 
'a much 's before he got married, 'cause he's so dead gone on his wife 
and baby, that 'a what 's the matter. Singular man ! It 's queer ihe 
things 't some girls laughed "n squirmed at in French 't if they was 
said in English, my! wouldn't there be a fuss? 

I do wonder if it's really true 't Milty's Ma is a-goin' to disdain 
Punch's advice, 'n do it; things look that way, certain. Moon-eyed 
Charley's been puttin' in his licks en route to the ranch 'n back. 
(Another case o' ostrich). I do think 't the California husbands is 
the most amiable men in the world. Ned says not a bit of it; but 't 
the vivid atmosphere gives 'em dimness o' vision. 

I do just wish you could a-seen old man Baker at the Del Monte 
New Year's with a paper cap on, 'n the old lady, dancin' the Virginia 
reel ! No wonder the ancient order o' Pioneers like to go there. We 
danced and feasted till we was all ready for repose; 'n next day, the 
first o' the year, was just too lovely for anything. Everybody was 
given pieces o' smoked glass to see the eclipse through, 'n some wan- 
dered off by themselves to enjoy a little side racket. One lady got 
lost, 'n the old Judge said it was easy to guess where to rind her, 
'cause she was forever in a maze! Did y'ever! The old boy was real 
frisky, 'n when Chris Frolich was tellin' a group all about how the 
Produce Exchange fellahs had gone wild at the close o' the year, 'n 
used Carey Fried] ander like a grainbag, stuffiu' his collar, 'n so forth, 
with corn *n wheat, be said: " Why. of course, you always look for 
chaff wherever there's grain." And I up 'n had my little say. too. 
Says I: " Yes, 'n tares, too." Now, I don't think that was bad for 
little Mag, was it?" And then Edith says: " Well, we have our own 
frolic down here." (Wasn't that the worst?) Chris sort o' smiled. 

But my goodness, you should a seen big Kearney! when the paper 
came down with the picture o' his country house, "after a French 
chateau;" didn't he look fine? The Judge had to make a riddle im- 
mediately. "Says he: " Why are we likely to see a Biblical quota- 
tion verified? " As you can imagine, there weren't many present 't 
was particularly well up in Bible history, 'n so he had to give the 
answer hisself. " Because the ancient virgins '11 be goin* for him." 
But you bet I'm too fresh from Sunday school to let the old chap 
misquote like that, *n so I hollered right out 't he was makin* lots o' 
mistakes. But it passed. Mrs. Blue Beard, as some folks call the 
millionaire's last wife, looked real sweet to the hop both nights (vou 
know 't we had two dances, New Year's eve and New Year's night). 
She's got lots o' ambition, too. One of the sights of the jour del'au 
(ain't I toney)? was the way 't different couples 'd pair off, 'u so care- 
less like, 's if it hadn't been all planned 'n fixed the night before. The 
young cattle chap appears to be takin' up the somewhat tangled skein 
of a long drawn out yarn, 'n she looked happy. A stray Britisher 'd 
now 'n then walk along 'n stare like anything when they saw one o' 
the aforesaid couples. 

I s'pose you'll think by this 't little Mag was one o' the pairs, but, 
you bet, not much. She just kept her eye on 'em all. 1 guess the 
Britisher thought 't this exhibition o' California pairs 'd beat any 
bunch to be seen in the windows o' the horticultural chaps. Young 
Milty Latham is a right promisin' kid, 'n carries on with the elderly 
friskies like a four-year-old o' Potashe's. Well, when the time come 
to say good-bye 'n return to town, everybody said 't they'd had a real 
good time, 'n com in' up in the train I sat behind a well known lady 
'n gentleman 't was makin' all sorts o' vows for the new year. She 
said *t she warn't never goin' to take no more fly dinners, 'cause the 
last one most made her die o' fright— her husband found a piece o' 
the note makin' the engagement for it in the waste paper basket. 
And then he said he'd made up his mind to marry 'n settle down— fur 
a spell, anyhow— 'n then she said, " Oh, wait, don't do it too soon," 
'n then 1 reckon there was another dinner decided on. 

The cars stopped to a station just then, 'n she looked over her 
shoulder 'n saw me right behind, 'n said, " Sh — sh," "n so I heard no 
more; but I reckon 't that's the way 't most resolves for the New 
Year '11 be kept. The first thing I heard when I got home was 't the 
old boys was buzzin' about givin* a fancy ball to their numerous lady 
friends, *n old man Hager had made a row 'cause he said he didn't 
want to have nothin' to do with a fancy outfit—" it didn't look well. 



'n the Monarch 'd get onto it" — leastways, in such a public manner, 
(the missus is back, you know). There's goin' to be several little 
sprees durin' the ensuin' fortnight, but of all this more anon, from 
your little friend, Mag. 



CARPETS AND UPHOLSTERY. 

We beg to announce the arrival of 
Fall styles of Carpetings and Uphol- 
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about to furnish is directed to the 
display in our warerooms of these 
novelties. 

Original designs for draperies, etc., 
furnished, if desired. 

W. & J. SLOANE & CO., 

641 to 647 MARKET STREET. 

Established 1843. 

Messrs. Deutz & Geldermann's 

GRAND VIN d'AY 




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In Magnums, Quarts and Pints, 

OF THE FAMOUS 1884 VINTAGE. 

For Sale in bond or duty paid by 

Charles Meinecke & Co., 

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GO TO 

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653 Market Street, 

FOR 

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WINDOW SHADES, 

And CORNICE POLES. 



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OF 

LANGUAGES, 

7 'Flood Building, San Francisco. Hamilton Hall, Oakland 
Ed ward Larcher, Theodore M. Moe, Principals. 



BAY DISTRICT ASSOCIATION. 

RACES ! } GRAND RUNNING MEETING. ^ RACES ! 

UNDER BLOOD-HOBSE RULES. 

Saturday January 5, 1889. 

Firat Race— ? s -mile; welter; 5 starters. Second Race— %-mile; heats- 8 
starters. Third Race— 2-year-olds ; 3 starters. Fourth Race— 1 mile; handi- 
cap; 12 starters. 

Admission, One Dollar. 

Jan. 5.J T. W. HINCHMAN, Manager. 



Jan. \ 1881V 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




"7.WICE in (his decade bave Ban Francis- 
cans bean treated to a aovel sighl on 
New Year's Day. En 1883, when the 

snow lay upon the ground to a depth 
hitherto no known even to t ht* oldest 
inhabitant of the oountry.and on Tuesday Last, when the 
entire population seemed to be employed in the task of 
easing skywards through smoked glass watching the eclipse. Luck- 
ily, the weather was mild. and. excepting for an hour or so, the day 
was bright and beautiful, making it a rare pleasure to be in the open 
air. The country is slowly putting on its robe of emerald green, and 
our brown hillsides beginning to present their most attractive appear- 
ance; but rarely it is time we had a little sunshine now, for, of a 
verily, we have had rain enough to last us for a while. 

Fashion having decreed that open house shall no longer be kept on 
New Year's I>ay, but that those who desire to be regarded as well 
placed in the swim shall spend the day as far from home as they can 
get, great was the hegira from town last Monday^ Del Monte being 
the objective point to the larger portion of those who sought the 
country. The weather was pleasant, and that most delightful hos- 
telry appeared to unusual advantage. Dancing and feasting appeared 
to be the sole end and aim of existence, and, as nothing was left un- 
done by mine host Schoenwald to provide both without stint for his 
guests, as a consequence everyone enjoyed themselves, and have re- 
turned to town only to rave of the delights of a visit to Monterey for 
the purpose of seeing an old year out and a new one in. 

The result has been a broken week in fashionable circles in town, 
and dinners have been the principal entertainments given. This can 
scarcely be viewed in the light of a hardship, taking into considera- 
tion the gaieties which have been crowded into the past, too, and 
people have been rather glad of the rest, and that the talked of par- 
ties will not take place just immediately. 

The ball given by Mrs. Hopkins last Friday night was a large and 
handsome one. The decorations were artistic, the supper excellent, 
and every attention was paid to the enjoyment of her guests by the 
hostess. So the evening was voted a successful one, from first to 
lust. Equally pleasant and enjoyable was the reception given at the 
Occidental ihe evening before by the members of the Loyal Legion 
in honor of General Miles, which was very largely attended; the 
bounteous supper, to which full justice was done, with the toasts and 
speeches as accompaniments, being among the most attractive fea- 
tures of the evening. Among the weddings of the week was that of 
Miss Mamie Elam and Mr. Alexander Stuart, who were united by 
Bishop Kip at the residence of the bride's mother on Monday last, 
the happy pair choosing New Year's Eve as a very appropriate time 
for renouncing single blessedness in favor of married life. 

Both the cotillion clubs are making extra preparations for their 
next dances. The Bachelors' Club cotillion will take place on Friday 
evening of next week, and the ladies are requested to attire them- 
selves in either pink or white, as those are the colors which will give 
name to what the leader of the evening— Mr. George Newhall— in- 
tends shall be the most perfect german ever attempted by the club. 
The German Club will give their next cotillion a couple of weeks 
later, and following the example of the rival club.it will be led by 
the army and navy alternately, the leader proper, Mr. Chauncey St. 
John, very gracefully yielding his place and taking third rank on 
that occasion. Lieutenant Hubbard will represent the army and 
Dr. Crawford the navy that evening, followed by Mr. St. John, who, 
it is said, will, for the fifth and final figure, which he will lead, intro- 
duce a new and pretty idea, to be there seen for the first time in any 
ballroom. 

Oakland can certainly bear away the palm for having had quite the 
most successful charitable entertainment of the season. The lady 
managers gracefully yield the credit of its having been so to Mrs. 
Requa, who, as the chairman of the committee of arrangements, 
showed a great deal of energy and enthusiasm, but from all appear- 
ances upon the evening of the entertainment itself, it may safely be 
said that Mesdames Shepherd, A. J. Ralston, Dunham, Wadsworth 
and Hall were powerful adjuncts, while the young ladies who served 
as attendant nymphs at the coffee and ice cream tables also deserve 
special mention for their efficient work. Camron Hall, where the en- 
tertainment took place, was very prettily and artistically decorated 
for the occasion, the style being of the Japanese order, the colors 
chosen— yellow, green and red— interspersed with lanterns, the stage 
boasting in addition, fans and umbrellas. The programme of the 
evening opened with a concert in which Mr. and Mrs. Walter Camp- 
bell, Ben Clark, Henry Heyman and Mrs. H. J. Stewart took part, 
and was followed by what was called an Irish cantata, the music of 
which was written by Mr. H. J. Stewart. In this humorous produc- 
tion appeared Frank linger, Ben Clark, Willard Barton and others, 
Mr. Fortesque taking the part of the English nobleman " as he used 
to was " in the minds of untraveled Americans. At the conclusion 
of this dancing was inaugurated, Mr. Chauncey St. John acting as 



leuder, Lemonade, tea, coffee and ices were all Liberally pair 
and charmingly served by Mi-- Lou Shepherd, Mr . Perrlne, Will 
lams and others, and It was very lair ere the affair broke up. The 

era of the Ladies' Relief Society all smiled al tin- succei 
social and financial, ol their undertaking. 

Mrs. Mackay has been giving Borne elaborate entertainments in 
London- She lately paid two singers $2/ for one night's entertain- 
ment at her house, and at a recent reception the celebrated Coquelln 
ami Mile. Reich enberg acted and recited, A] win a V&lleria sung, and 
Woolf, the great violinist and critic, played. As usual, the floral dis- 
play was magnificent, and copied the heated rooms. 

Two good women, both welt known in San Francisco, have gone to 
their last rest during the past week. I allude to Mrs. Gen. Sc ho field 
and Mrs. Joseph Austin, familiarly known as Betsy B. Of the latter 
it can be said that her bright, warm nature and talented pen won her 
hosts of f rends and admirers, and her loss is one that will leave a 
vacant place not easily filled, both socially and in the literary dice 
of our coast. 

Mrs. Parrot! has at length taken possession of her new home on 
Sutter street, and has with her daughters, Mrs. Hayne and Mrs. 
Pay son, who, with their husbands, will reside with their mother 
during the winter months. Captain and Mrs. Collier, with their 
family, are domiciled at the Occidental Hotel for the rest of the 
season. Among other recent arrivals in town are Mrs. Peter Dona- 
hue. Baron and Baroness Von Schroder, from their visit to New York, 
Mr. Carleton Coleman, from the Sandwich Islands, Mr. Will Tevis. 
from quite a sojourn in the East, and Miss Kva Carolan. Mrs. Fred, 
Sharon returns to New York to-day, after a short but very pleasant 
holiday visit to her friends and relatives in San Francisco. Fkux. 

DEATH OF A BRILLIANT WOMAN. 
It is our sad duty to chronicle the death of Mrs. Joseph Austin. 
She was a woman who, had she the opportunities that are offered to 
those who live in the great centers, would have made for herself a 
name and a fame in the higher phases of literature. As it was, her 
reputation as a writer, extending the breadth of the continent, was 
based mainly upon her work as a dramatic critic. Her writings be- 
tokened imagination and world-knowledge, a keen perceptive sense, 
a delicate receptive faculty, sensibility and sentiment, fairness and 
tact, charity and good nature, expressed in exquisite language, full 
of beautiful similies, apt illustrations, cogent reasoning and graceful 
humor, tempered by the kindness of a true woman's heart. In her 
Criticisms there were certain elements which are generally associated 
with masculine minds. It may be said that, from a certain point of 
view, her mental organization had a masculine character; but it had 
none of the harshness, cynicism, maliciousness or indifference of the 
man, for if the mind had a masculine character the heart was all fem- 
inine, and the heart dominated. As a woman she was a lovely char- 
acter. She had all the traits that make woman loveable. She 
understood all those with whom she came in contact, and she 
adapted herself to them. It was her aim to make them happy and 
satisfied. She had ever kind words of encouragement, of advice, of 
consolation or of affection for those who needed them. She sought to 
help along those who valued her aid in every way possible. She was 
a true friend and her friends were true. For many years she was the 
leading spirit of a coterie of journalists, writers, musicians and 
artists, who grouped around her, formed what was almost a salon. 
To all of these there are no happier recollections than those Sunday 
evenings, with their mingling of Eastern refinement and Western 
open-heartedness. A bright woman, a clever woman, a kind-hearted 
woman, a true woman was our friend, and the void in our hearts is 
one that can not be filled. 

To be Issued in January— The fashionable private address direc- 
tory, "The San Francisco Blue Book," season 1S8S-9, embracing Sun 
Francisco, Oakland, Alameda and all adjacent towns. To contain 
the names and private addresses of all society people, with their re- 
ception days, membership of the principal clubs, and theatre dia- 
grams. Published by the Bancroft Companv, 721 Market street, San 
Francisco. Price, full cloth. $1.50; full cloth, gilt, $3.00. 



iipftgtej 




W. B. CHAPMAN, 

123 California St., San Fra tttta* 

SOLE AGENT FOR THE PACIFIC COA3 ? 

For sale by all first-class Wine-Merchan-o 
and Grocers. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 5, 1889. 



GOTHAM GOSSIP. 

RS. James Brown Potter has returned to us. She has had 
some of her gowns made over, and she has acquired a tine 
stage sneer. Except for these minor differences she is our 
JefciJ_ OW n Mrs. James Brown Potter still. The gowns were bad 
enough before, but they are worse now, and, though Amer- 
ica owes the immortal Worth one or more for mercilessly bleeding 
he/ daughters without number, it is taking a hideous revenge to 
hang Mrs. Potter's wardrobe around his neck. In the first act of 
* Twixt Axe and Crown she wears a rather handsome court costume, 
and from out the stiff white brocade her flower face rises like a deli- 
cate medallion framed in its aureole of bronzed hair. After this there 
is a black velvet gown trimmed with tin — at least, it looks like tin- 
in strange "planetary" designs, and set off by a tin girdle. Then 
there is an indescribable garment in the Tower garden, and the con- 
ventional black of stage despair in the Tower cell, and from this 
sombre chrysalis springs a scarlet velvet butterfly for the grande 
finale. This velvet robe has been advertised as the " Potter red " 
costume, which cost M. Worth sleepless nights, and was designed es- 
pecially for the coronation scene of 'TtoixtAxe and Crown, an inter- 
esting fact which is a tnfie marred by one vivid recollection of this 
particular gown worn by Mrs. Potter at a benefit matinee last year. 
Whatever she may wear she is the prettiest woman on the stage. More 
than pretty — beautiful — although no one can say after what school, 
except that is far removed from the roses and lilies of Langtry love- 
liness, and is what the French call Iroublante. She is so exquisite that 
she is attractive in spite of an agonizing awkwardness which, by the 
way, is as individual as her beauty and like unto none other. Of course, 
at her debut she was beset by the usual leg and arm difficulty of the 
amateur, but this she has compassed with an awful freedom. With 
her chin well out and the rest of her head hunched down into her 
shoulders, with clenched hands and long, lean arms rigidly binding 
her corsetless body, she goes convoluting across the boards by some 
singular process which has its motive power at the hip and works 
botn, ways at once. Have you seen a small boy get up a hill by taking 
one step forward and two back? You have, then, seen the nearest 
approach to the new Potter exit. There is not the slightest indica- 
tion of her direction until she has finally disappeared. This is a part 
of the '' sneer " which, for the rest of it, has been borrowed from 
Kyrle Bellew. His a good, solid sneer, very hi^h-bred and haughty, 
very beautiful and very Bellew. Mrs. Potter makes a good deal out 
of it, but she is not quite Elizabethan, even with its assistance. 

One or two very swell theatre parties graced her opening at Palm- 
ers, and something in connection with the sweetest struck me as in- 
finitely — well, queer! Tucked neatly into the corner of the pro- 
gramme, but^by no means inconspicuous— oh, by no means — appeared 
the following paragraph : 

" Mrs. G e K d will give a large theatre party this evening 

in honor of Mrs. Potter's first appearance in 'Twixt Axe and Crown at 

this theatre. Several boxes have been reserved, and Mrs. K d 

will be assisted by Mrs. B 1 C g in chaperoning the party. 

After the theatre a supper will be given in the general dining-room 
at Delmonico's." 

Now, the question arises as to who paid for that notice. Mrs. 
James Brown Potter, or her managers— Mr. Abbey or Mr. Palmer, 

the proprietor of the theater — or Mrs. G e K d, assisted by 

Mrs. B tC g? 

This we shall never know. 

It was a very handsome party, and a very well dressed one. but in 
the other boxes I noticed two girls in low directoire gowns, wearing 
large hats. This sort of costume has so long been relegated to the 
demi-monde of Paris, beside being in bad form and unlovely in itself, 
that ladies, even in New York can scarcely don it with impunity. 
These two girls brought down a steady tire of opera glasses manipu- 
lated by masculine kids. 

And speaking of Masculine Kids, one sat directly in front of me on 
Wednesday evening, wearing the first approach to the incroyable 
style 1 have seen attempted by the sterner sex, much as it has beeu 
threatened. He was really less than a Kid— only a Babe, in fact ; but 
a Babe About Town, with a faded, weary, utterly fane expression 
about the eyes and a droop at the corners of his mouth. He wore a 
dress coat with wide lappels, satin-faced— oh chose etrange /—over a 
double-breasted black satin waistcoat, adorned with two rows of huge 
metal buttons, enameled in dull colors, a frilled shirt, and about his 
throat— white and slender as a woman's— was the wide, soft folds of 
the directoire cravat. I could not see his legs. 
New York City, December 26, 1888. Ballaed Craig. 

TheBaldwin Hotel has a name and a fame not only on the Pa- 
cific Coast, but through the heart of the continent, on the Atlantic 
slope, and even in Europe. Its reputation is deserved, for its single 
rooms and suites are convenient, and, indeed, luxurious, and the 
table is one that will tempt any rational, healthy appetite. It is near 
enough to the business center to be handy to business men, and far 
enough up town to afford a retired home to those with quiet tastes. 

A convention of California raisin-growers has been called to meet 
at the rooms of the State Board of Horticulture on January 19th, to 
consult in regard to the best means of promoting this growing indus- 
try of California. The various packers— and why not the growers— 
of the State have been called upon to prepare papers and essays re- 
garding the industry, to be read at the convention. 



TOO LATE. 

What silence we keep year after year 

With those who are most near to us, and dear. 

We live beside each other day by day, 

And speak of myriad things, and seldom say 

The full, sweet word that lies just in our reach, 

Beneath the commonplace of common speech. 

Then out of sight and out of reach they go— 

These close, familiar friends who love us; 

And, sitting in the shadow they have left, 

Alone with loneliness and sore bereft. 

We think with vain regret of some fond word 

That once we might have said and they have heard. 

For weak and poor the love that we express 

Now seems beside the vast sweet unexpressed; 

And slight the deeds we did to those undone, 

And small the service spent to treasures won, 

And undeserved the praise for word and deed 

That should have overflowed the simple need. 

This is the cruel cross of life, to be 

Full-vision ed only when the ministry 

Of death has been fulfilled, and in the place 

Of some dear presence is but empty space. 

What recollected service e'er can then 

Give consolation for the might have been? 



" Did you ever shave a woman?" was the queer question put to 
a New York barber by a customer who was being shaved. " Many a 
time," said the barber, who went on to tell of his experience in that 
line of business. '* There are ladies in town who have quite a mus- 
tache, and others who have something like a chin beard, and I have 
operated on both_ kinds. I shaved the upper lip of a lady yesterday 
afternoon to prepare her to go out to a party. She keeps down the 
growth of hair by clipping it, but she wanted to look extra fine on 
this occasion. Some of them who are troubled as she is pull out the 
hairs, a few at a time, till they get rid of the whole growth ; and there 
is now an electrical way of removing them without pain from any 
part of the face. But I know of ladies who get barbers to shave 
them at times, and others who can shave themselves just like men. 
I tell you there are more kinds of folks in this barbarous world than 
some people know of." Here the knight of the brush shouted 
" Next!" 

" Lydia Thompson is said to look as young as she did when she first visit- 
ed America uearly thirty years ago." "Why so?" "Because she uses 
Madame Rachel's Bloom of Youth." 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 California Street, San Francisco. 

CAPITAL. $800,000. 

Officers— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President, FRED. EOEDING ; Cash- 
ier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT; Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN. Board of 
Directors— L. Gottig, Fred. Roediug, Chas. Meinecke,Edw. Kruse, George H 
Eggers, N. Van Bergen, Ign. Steinhart, O. Schoemaun. Secretary, Geo. 
Tourny. Attorneys, Jareoe, Harrison and Goodfellow. [Dec. 1. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

822 PINE STREET. 
PAID-UP CAPITAL $1,000,000. 

DIRECTORS : 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, | E. H. MILLER, Jr. 

R. c. WOOLWORTH President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashier 

[Oct. 28.J 

SECURITY SAVIN6S BANK. 

Guarantee Capital $300 000 

OFFICERS: 

President JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary S. L. ABBOT Jr 

Vice-President W. S. JONES | Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. Aug. 22. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Sansome and Pine Streets. 

LONDON OFFICE— 3 Angel Court. 
NEW YORK CORRESPONDENT— J. W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL STOCK, $6 000,000. 
Will receive deposits, open accounts, make collections, buy and sell 
exchange and bullion, loan money and issue letters of credit available 
throughout the world. FRED. F. LOW, I ,,„„ , 

IGN. STEINHART, ( Managers. 
P. N. Lilien thal. Cashier. [March 36, 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 18 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER. ...President. | ERNST BRAND Secretary. 

LOANS AT LOW RATES. [Dec. 29. 



Jan. ■"», L889, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTER. 



A TRUST BOOM. 
Combinations of capital to monopolize articles ol cenernl con- 
sunipUua ut booming In »N directions. In their active modern 
form they may be BaM t<> have taken their rise Id the United States, 
hut ere now rapidly spreading throughout many lands. During the 
recent campaign it was said thai the trusts of the period were tin- 
known In England, hi. A that was measurably true; but, short as the 
interval has been, it has Bufflced to bring to light not a little Informa- 
tion as to the progress trusts are making in that country. Thai they 
are taking root there is clear. A gigantic salt trust was recently 
formed which has gobbled up marly all the individual manufacturers, 
and now an English journal tells us that" the pottery ring threatens 
to be an even more ahominable business than the salt syndicate. " All 
the available supplies of bone ash and calcined bones used in the 
making of china have been bought up, and those manufacturers who 
have not Jolued these new pirates are compelled to pay the advance 
of lii'ty per cent which has taken place in consequence of their action. 
The success of the latest combine means not only a heavy increase 
in the price of china and earthenware, which is already high, but the 
Crushing out Ol the majority of the small firms which are unable to 
compete with this new and powerful rival. Evidently English capi- 
tal is not going to be slow in following the evil lines marked out for 
it in ibis country. France has long been experimenting in the same 
direction, though not with invariable success. Her greatcopper syn- 
dicate was a big thing, but the bottom is falling out of it— partly 
because of the bad faith of producers in America, who are increasing 
their output in all directions. Whilst the supply is increasing, the 
demand is rapidly decreasing, and the inevitable result is an ever- 
accumulating stock, for which there is not a market. Upon the 
whole, however, syndicates have been remarkably successful. If not 
cheeked by legislation, it is certain they will go on extending their 
operations until they control every commercial article of general use. 
The time must come when consumers will have to protect themselves. 
The evil is not one that will cure itself. What now becomes of the 
doctrine of the so-called political economists that prices are regulated 
by the law of supply and demand? Aggregated capital has inter- 
posed its enormous powers and decreed that the supply shall always 
be leas than the demand. The commercial world is face to face with 
a new ami startling problem that will have to be solved sooner or 
later. 



ZBJLUSriECS. 



AN EXAMPLE WORTHY OF COMMENDATION. 

The Sheriff of Birmingham, Alabama, may fittingly be held up 
as an exemplar to officials all over the land. A cool, intrepid and 
fearless man, every inch of him, he has struck a blowfor the suprema- 
cy of the law that is worth all it cost, which is saying not a little, 
seeing that it involved the sacrifice of several lives. A lawless mob 
sought to take a prisoner out of the jail and hang him. Subsequent 
events indicate that the man is probably innocent, but whether he be 
or not, his right to protection remains the same. The law has its 
duties as well as its rights. It was holding him to answer at the time, 
and until he had had an opportunity to do that he was entitled to all 
the protection it could throw around him. The Sheriff, realizing the 
obligations imposed upon him by the law and his official duty, warned 
the mob that any attempt on their part to enter the jail would be 
resisted to the last extremity, and that he would not hesitate to fire 
if a combined attack were made. This warning being unheeded, the 
Sheriff was as good as bis word. He held the jail, protected his 
prisoner and gave the law a signal and much-needed triumph. His 
fire was quick, sharp and decisive, yet it was probably a merciful 
volley, for if that mob had been less sternly dealt with, it is hard to 
say where the mischief might have ended. The riot might easily 
have assumed the dimensions, which, under like circumstances, they 
did in Cincinnati, three years ago. In the latter case the mob had a 
rational explanation— though there could be no justification— for 
what they did. The police and law officers were so notoriously cor- 
rupt that there was only too much reason to believe the law would be 
cheated of its dues. The Birmingham mob, however, had no such 
excuse. It was simply a passionate, reckless and determined lynch, 
ing party; of which there are all too many in certain parts of the 
country. The Sheriff did his duty, as he saw it, and that he saw it 
rightly is the unprejudiced opinion of good citizens everywhere. He 
taught a much-needed lesson to the lawless spirits of the land, who 
do not realize that the law must be supreme over all of us. It is to 
be regretted that Alabama does not seem worthy of such an official. 
He has been suspended from office and indicted for murder. 

Brown is the leaf upon the tree 
That saw me bend to her my knee — 

Last Summer. 
Brown is the stone front of her bouse, 
I pass it, quiet as a mouse — 

But glummer 1 —p nc k. 

Gold was her hair that waved in the breeze 
As I walked beside the little tease 

Demurely. 
Gold was the gleam in her father's bank 
That seemed love's craving spirit to flank — 

Quite surely. 

Wrinkles caused from defective vision, abolished by Muller, the leading 
Optician, 135 Montgomery street, near Bush, opposite Occidental. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Koynl Charter. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $2,500,000 

RESERVE FUND 500,000 

Southeast corner California and Sansome Streets. 
Head Office— 28 CORNHILL, London. 

Branches— Portland, 0.: Victoria, British Columbia. 

Sub-Branches— New Westminster, Vancouver. Nanalmo and Kamloops, British 
Columbia. 

This Bauk transacts a General Ranking; Business. Accounts opeued sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Oltice and Brauches, aud upon its Agents, as follows- 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bauk of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British Llueu Company IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO aud SOUTH AMERICA— Loudon Bank 
of Mexico and South America; CHINA aud JAPAN— Chartered Bauk of 
India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND- Bauk of 
Australa-sia, Commercial Banking Compauyof Sydney, English, Scottish aud 
Australian Chartered Bank and National Bauk of Australasia; DEMERARA 
and TRINIDAD (West Indies)-Colonial Bank. [March 24. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000 

WM. ALVORD, President. 
Thomas Brown. Cashier | B. Murray, Jr .. .Assistant Cashier 

AGENT8: 

NEW YORK— Agency of the Bank of California; BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bauk; CHICAGO— Union National Bauk; ST. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Saving Bank; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent 
iu Loudon— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild A Sous. Correspondents in Iudia 
China, Japan aud Aastralia. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland.O., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hougkong 
Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities iu Italv and Switzerland. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

1 ESTABLISHED IN 1870.J 

UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY. 

CAPITAL STOCK PAID UP $1,600,000 

SURPLUS $300,000 

UNDIVIDED PROFITS 162,974— 462,974 

DIRECTORS : 

S. G. Murphy, James Moffitt, D. Callaghan. Geo. A. Low, James M. Douahue, 

James D. Phelan, N.Van Bergeu, J as. H. Jennings, J. A. Hooper. 

President. S. G. MURPHY I Cashier E.D.MORGAN 

Vice-President .JAMES MOEFITT | Ass't Cashier . . . GEO. W. KLINE 
Transacts a general banking business. Issues Commercial aud Travelers' 
Credits. Buys aud Sells Exchange on London, Dublin, Paris, the principal 
cities of Germany and the United States. Collections made and prompt 
returns rendered at market rates of exchange. |Sept. 8. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 | Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reaetue Fund, $250,000. 

Head Office 9 and 10, Tokenhouse Yard, Lothbury, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.), 46 Exchange Place. PARI8— Messrs. Lazard Freres &Cie, 17 Boulevard 
Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Commercial 
and Travelers' Credits issued. DAVID CAHN. ( „„„„ M 

EUGENE MEYER, 1 Mana gers. 
C. Altschul, Cashier. (March 26. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

Agency at New York 62 Wall Street 

Agency at Virginia, Nevada. 

London Bankers Union Bank of London (Limited i 

DIRECTORS: 

JAMES G. FAIR. JAS. L. FLOOD, JNO. W. MACKAV 

A. E. DAVIS, JOHN F. BIGELOW. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 

Capital and Reserve, $2,375,000. 

San Francisco Office, 424 California St. I London Office 22 Old Broad St. 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. 
Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER ; Assistant Manager, William Steel. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. June 9. 

WELLS, FARGO & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $4,694,805.04 

DIRECTORS: 
Lloyd Tevis, President: Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Cnas. Crocker, J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris, Geo. E. Gray 
and C. F. Crocker. H. Wadsworth, Cashier. 

Receive Deposits, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Banking 
Business. [Aug. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 5, 1889. 



THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY. 
How many times, within the glass, 
I see a figure pause and pass; 
As like myself as it can be, 
And yet it scarcely looks at me. 
But one day, one, before the glass 
I paused, and did not dare to pass; 
For there, with some foreknowledge lit, 
A face looked out— I looked at it. 
The sad eyes pierced me through and through. 
From the set lips a challenge Hew; 
As it had passed through searching flame, 
A voice, imperious, called my name. 
Before some clear, inshining light. 
My earthly atoms fled from sight; 
As that which evermore would be. 
My soul itself confronted me. 
I looked at it, ashamed, dismayed; 
It wore a crown— I was afraid ; 
As one who might, it made demands 
Of blood and brain, of heart and hands. 
It questioned me, it whispered clear 
Great secrets that I ought to hear; 
It bade me keep, in solemn trust 
Its royal purple from the dust. 
The tryst was ended— I could see 
A vail drop down 'twixt it and me; 
I had no question more to ask 
Of Life or Death— I knew my task. —Scribner's. 



TO DRAW OR NOT TO DRAW 

To draw, or not to draw; that is the question. 

Whether 'tis coonier in the mind to venture 

The doubtful chance of skinning for a straight, 

Or to stand pat against a C of greenbacks, 

And then by bluffing, get 'em. To draw — to ante 

More. But by that draw, to fill; and end 

The tremors and the thousand direful haps 

That hands are bare to. Tis a consummation 

Devoutly to be wished. To draw — to fill! 

To fill? — perchance to bust! Aye, there's the rub! 

For in that vagrom draw, what cards may come 

When we have shuffled off th' uncertain pack, 

Must give us pause. There's the foul take 

That makes calamity of a bob-tailed Mush ! 

For who would stand the blind, the crafty raise, 

The wait upon the age, the reckless straddle, 

The insolence of pats, the vile, base cards, 

The patient player of the dealer takes, 

When he as well might his spondulics save 

By simply passing? Who would chaffing bear, 

Or grunt and fret under a cruel raise. 

Forsake his aces up, lay down three queens. 

But that the dread of seeing after call 

The undiscovered full, against whose might 

No flush can stand, puzzles the will, 

And makes us rather nurse the chips we have 

Than curious of hands we know not of. 

Thus does the draw make cowards of us all ! 

And thus a sanguine four heart speculation 

Is sickened with a black, unwelcome club; 

And lovely jack-pots of great wealth and moment. 

Without the cards, their fortunes turn awry. 

Losing the right to open. —Chim go Herald. 



LOST SOULS. 
They passed before my threshold, 

The lost souls, one by one, 
I watched them from the daybreak 

Unto the set of sun. 
1 said, " My soul's unshaken 

Because I have not sinned; 
Sorely they reap the whirlwind. 

They who have sown the wind." 
The burden of their failure. 

It was no more my own 
Than a far distant struggle, 

Lost in a land unknown. 
Till it seemed a sudden shadow 

Over my threshold crossed, 
And I knew the play was ended, 

And my own soul was lost. —May Kendall. 

Didn't Look so.— He (at a Tompkins street soiree) — Yo' is not 
lookin' quite yo' usual sel' dis ebenin', Miss Johnsing, Ise sorry 
ter see." 

She — No, Mistah Jackson ; de fac' is, Ise feeling blue. 

He (sympathizingly)— Dat distresses me, 'deed it do; but, aw— 
youse not looking blue, Miss Johnsing. — Life. 



JOHN W. MACKAY'S CHRISTMAS GIFT. 

A beautiful silver punch-bowl was one of the presents received 
by John W. Mackay, of the Commercial Cable Company, on Christ- 
mas Day. It was intended especially to commemorate the fourth 
anniversary of the opening of the cables, and was accompanied by an 
illuminated album containing an address and the signature of every 
member of the staff, both European and American. The address, 
recounting the benefits enjoyed by the establishment of the Company, 
expresses a desire on this anniversary to expresses to Mr. Mackay a 
fitting appreciation of his enterprise in founding the extensive system 
of cables, which have revolutionized ocean telegraphy. The punch- 
bowl is in the form of a globe, and is a superb example of the silver- 
smith's art. The standard is a piece 22J4 inches in diameter, sup- 
ported on four wrought standards, each one of which has a typical 
figure— North, South, East and West. North is a female holding a 
magnet, signifying the lode star and its influence. South is another 
female figure, graceful in design, holding tropical fruits in her hands, 
together with a palm leaf. East and West are male figures, the 
former carrying a shield on which is an Egyptian sun, and the latter 
a tablet showing the setting sun. From the center of the base rises 
an ornate raffle, upon which dashes the foam of a restless sea. 
Three dolphins in the sea uphold the globe, on which the Mackay- 
Bennett lines are shown by gold cables, while in the mouths of the 
dolphins is a miniature submarine cable. The entire work is most 
beautiful from an artistic standpoint, and no mere description will 
do it justice. On the globe is the following inscription: " To John 
W. Mackay. Presented by the officers and staff of the Commercial 
Cable Company, December 24, 1838." 



" The misery which women in hotels undergo on Sunday," said a 
hotel clerk to a New York Sun writer, " is the chief cause of all the 
hotel scandal and gossip that finds its way into the newspapers. I 
doubt very much if there is any lonelier spot on earth than a hotel 
bedroom on a Sunday afternoon, and when the day is warm the 
women sit at the windows and stare stolidly out into the street, 
hoping against hope that something will turn up to interest them. 
Something very generally does turn up about three o'clock in the 
afternoon— a good many somethings occasionally. They are other- 
wise known as mashers. They ogle women from restaurants across 
the street, and the women flirt with them purely through idleness 
and loneliness. Then the mashers make various efforts to get up 
stairs. Some of them come to the desk and send their card up to any 
one whom they happen to know in the house, and some of them bribe 
the porters, but the old-time rounders walk in in a business-like way, 
settle themselves down in the elevator, alight on the right floor, and 
then engage in a still hunt for the rooms. Meanwhile the porter is 
engaged in a still hunt for the masher. Not a Sunday passes that 
there is not more or less trouble in every big hotel in this way." 






fy 



tjOET&@AHporl 

Pacific Coast Agents: 

Sherwood & Sherwood, 

212-214 Market Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. [Decs. 

MILLS COLLEGE AND SEMINARY. 

The next term will begin January 9, 1889- The College Course corresponds 
very nearly to that of wellesley College, Mass. 
Take Oakland boat and Niles trains to Seminary Park station. 
For circulars or information apply to 

REV. C. STKATTON, D. D., 
Or MRS. C. T. MILLS, 
Jan. 5.] Mills Seminary P. O., Alameda Couaty, Cal. 



Jan. "., 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



!> 



THE WORLD, FLESH AND DEVIL 



CyflK wuaqneenly creature, writes Clara Belle, and she sat (it 
\j the front of ■ box right where the tight fell on her with artistic 
. ;\ «'tiv-*'t of illumination. She vu visible to oataiders only as low 

f^_J down hs tlu* waist. Her tongi White, taper arin> WON bared to 

the tops of her magnificent shoulders, where the merest sec- 
tion-* ol [ ribbon separated them iroiu her smooth mvk. She held a 

t<k' white Feather tan in trout of her corsage and indolently operated 

it. From my point of observation, in an opposite box, her bodice 
WAS hidden by the tan. from behind which her lovely neck arose and 
her arm- extended. N-'t a -'Tap of fahrie was in sight. She Btrnck 

me. most alarmingly, a- being sltogether unclothed and screening 
beraeU behind the plumes of the nu. Of course I realised in an in- 
stant that it wasn't so, because two men sat rlo.se beside her, and if 
she ha.! discovered herself in s^eh a plight before masculine eyes she 
would have instantly huddled herself down in a heap and yelled like 
goshalmighty. Nevertheless, as the slowly moved fan was gradually 
lowered and it did not disclose the beginnings of raiment, 1 felt a re- 
turn of my first absurd consternation. Lower and lower went the 
fan. The bits of ribbon over the shoulders developed into small 
Sprays of (lowers, but still no cloth marked the boundary of nudity. 
The bosom was fair to see, bnt, hail Columbia I where was its public 
exposition to end? Suddenly the girl dropped the fan into her lap. 
I was all ready to yell if my fears came true. I felt my eyes stare, 
and I am sure that 1 turned pale. But it was all right, after all. She 
bad on a dress. It began across her breast at a low level, but it was 
there. The fan bad given me an awful scare, though. 

Sarah Bernhardt is creating the usual sensation even in the land 
of the Sphinx, writes the Paris correspondent of the Morning Jour- 
nal. The something Egyptian of her facial outline, on which so many 
have commented, is more than ever remarked, and her desire to daz- 
zle everybody is no greater than it would be if she were a daughter ot 
Ptolemy or a direct descendant of the great Rameses himself. She 
is booked for ten performances at Cairo and ten at Alexandria; 
but it is what she does off the stage which makes such a stir. The 
magnificence of her dresses and the prodigality of her way of living 
are making everybody stare. She is attended when she goes out 
driving or afoot by a horde ot Egytian fellahs and a party of swag- 
gering dragomans. All her movements are those of a modern Theo- 
dora, and from the palaces to the hovels she is the wonder of every- 
body. The swarms of beggars are louder in her praises than any- 
body, so lavishly does she scatter backsheesh. Her visit to the Great 
Pyramid was a sight to be remembered. She stood for half an hour 
in front of the Sphinx, and then turned to her favorite companion 
and said: " Tenez, if her nose were not broken she would resemble 
me. My friend, if you could see me a hundred years from now 1 
would look exactly like that." Then she gave a little shudder, and 
said she was " devilish hungry." She is making immense sums of 
money, but of course it wouldn't be Sarah if she did not spend twice 
as much as she makes. It is asserted that she allows her son Mau- 
rice, who married the Princess, $G0,000 a year. Her expenses have 
been enormous everywhere. Her bill for baggage transport in Aus- 
tria was $0,500. in Roumania $1,000. in Turkey $7,000. 

" I have heard some indefinite rumors about padding. Is it really 
so that this deception is ever practiced?" asked the innocent re- 
porter. " Well, rather," answered Leila Kavanaugh. " But our 
name for them is symmetrical. There are calf, thigh and waist 
symmetricals, and, considering their valuable aid to some actresses, 
their cost is comparatively slight. When a girl requires symmetricals 
her leg is measured its entire length, all its deficiencies are marked, 
and the padding is placed where it will do the most good. When the 
leg is perfectly smooth, and when their is no quiver in the Hesh in 
moving, and when a wrinkle is noticeable beneath the knee, you may 
be very sure there is padding under the tights. None but the ama- 
teur element affords the needless expense of hip, thigh or bust de- 
velopers. Your real hard-working actress relies upon chance for 
such emergencies, and when they arise utilizes hotel towels, surplus 
stockings and other eccentricities of female attire. I tell you 1 pitv 
the country hotel proprietors when once girls in the variety line 
strike their town." " Are tights ever worn beneath long clothes?" 
"Seldom. In the Greek costume they are usually worn, because 
there is an entire absence of underclothes. There are certain in- 
stances when this is desirable — for example, in the bedroom scene in 
Margaret Mather's Juliet, where the actress is supposed to be in her 
nightrobe, with no other protection around her." 

The number ot artificial teeth made in America last year by three 
of the largest business houses engaged in the trade was nearly 20,- 
000,000, and this was not more than half the actual production of the 
country. One peculiar feature of the business is that the houses 
which do the most extensive export trade are obliged to prepare teeth 
of different colors for different countries. In Canada, for instance, 
the demand is for molars as white as snow, while in South America 
no such teeth could be sold. There they require teeth that are al- 
most yellow, and the trade from China, which is a lucrative one, is 
for nothing but black teeth. 



Amelie Rives is essentially a pocket Venae. Bheis diminutive in 
stature and sylph-Ilke in form, with bright, straw-colored hair, which 

Bbe ties in a Psyche knot; soft, violet eyes, ander sweeping, coal blai : 

lash.-, and a veritable Cupid's OOWOf 8 mouth. She speaks with a slight 
Southern lisp, ami Ifl a most charming listener. Her painting 
full of color as Aamodeus's, and her rendering of Chopin 
thing to remember, she rides to bounds and has thirty-one pel dogs, 
and she has taught her Scotch terrier to sing. She writes a copper- 
plate hand, and is prouder of having invented her monogram in blond 
red letters on a deep-gray background than of having crealcd " The 
Qnickor the Dead?" Her husband, John Armstrong (hauler, is 
tall, lanky and boyish-looking. He has a mud-colored, pimply, com- 
plexion, anil a retiring mustache, which he is always urging to come 
on. He is about twenty-eight, and was educated at Rugby, where 
he picked up the word " really," which he uses with singular 
rapidity when spoken on the subject of " The Quick or the Dead?" 
He never attempts to speak while his wife has the floor. He is not 
dull, and he has been round the world. He is on good terms with his 
tailor, and he places implicit confidence in the husband of Amelie 
Rives. ^^^^ —Epoch. 

All the jewels which Mrs. Potter wears on the stage are gifts. She 
has just had sent from Russia a set of turquoise, which were chosen 
by Lieutenant Buckingham, of the American Legation. They are 
said to be thousands of years old, and yet are as blue as the heavens. 
They are chiseled and veined with gold, and three in number, form- 
ing a clasp for a belt or three pendants. Each turquoise is as big as 
a seckel pear and about that shape, and are bound with diamonds. 
" This is a mascot and was given me in Canada," said Mrs. Potter, 
showing her arm, on which was a curious twisted iron and gold 
bracelet. : 'Itisa Zulu bracelet, and I was told that it contained 
deadly poison, and if it became broken it would kill me." A comb, 
also an antique, set with seven big emeralds each, surrounded by 
diamonds, a big spray of diamonds, two handsome necklaces of single 
stones, and pearl necklaces are among her largest pieces, fourteen 
rings, each set with one or more rare stones, and as many pins and 
brooches, besides jeweled girdles and an exquisite bracelet of chased 
gold, set with three large deep blue sapphires, which was given her 
by the Princess of Wales. 

"When. I ride uptown, says a World reporter, and meet such men as 
Claus Spreckels of San Francisco (whose sugar trust is not the Sugar 
Trust trust), J. H. Flagler, the Havemeyers, Jay Gould and Sefior 
Don Francisco de P. Alvarez of the Henry Clay Cigar Trust all in 
one L train on Sixth avenue at once, New York street life begins to 
take on a decidedly monopolistic appearance. These men were all 
pointed out in a car a day or two ago—a Rector-street train bound 
for Fifty-eighth street. It was 3:30 in the afternoon, and Wall street 
was disgorging. The younger brokers laughed and chatted, threw 
back their natty velvet coat-collars, and talked of the street with an 
air of ownership. The elder ones, gray-bearded or double-chinned, 
talked less and more modestly. The trust barons either didn't talk 
at all as they sat immersed in the solitude of their own magnificence, 
or, if they did drop into desultory conversation, sauced it with no 
smiles. 

Said an attache of the Park Theatre one night last week as Clara 
Morris was nearing the conclusion of her play: M It will be 12 o'clock 
before Miss Morris leaves the house. When the curtain falls on this 
act she will sob and scream all the way to her dressing room, and 
there she will sit for an hour rocking back and forth until she gets 
quieted down. Then she will put on her street costume and leave 
the theatre. Georgia Cay van usually leaves the stage at the end of the 
third act of The Wife in hysterics, and it takes some time for her to 
recover herself." — Brooklyn Eagle. 

The latest craze among the actresses is the hand and arm photo- 
graph, says an exchange. They spend no end of money posing their 
hands to have pictures taken of them. Almost always they hold 
something in the hand that is to be pictured — a wineglass, a diamond 
ring just touched by two dainty fingers, a visiting card or a silver 
coin. Those who are proud of their arms have them photographed, 
often the full bare arm and shoulder without a hint of clothing, or 
just the hint of a short lace sleeve, with a buxom arm issuing from 
it. Some non-professionals are beginning to share the craze. 

Probably* the largest man in Iowa is J. H. Craig, of Iowa city. He 
is 32 years old, 6 ft. 4% in. tall, and has weighed as much as 833 
pounds. 

In a suit for divorce in St. Louis the plaintiff, Mrs. Allie Villert 
testified that her husband once pawned her wedding dress for a drink 
of liquor. 

It is said that there are now orders ahead in the shops of Paris and 
London for all the golden hair that can be purchased in the next five 
years. 

Miss Keane (to handsome young physician) — " Oh, doctor, how 
do you do? You look killing this evening." 

Young Physician (quietly) — "Thank you, but I'm not; I'm off 
duty, don't you know." —Brake's Magazine. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Nov. 5, 1889. 




SN awkward horseman may be tripped up by his spurs, a toy 
soldier may stumble over his sword, but there is no misery 
more complete than that experienced by a woman who be- 
comes entangled in her own skirts. Skirts— they are the 
bane of the feminine existence; they are either too short or 
too long, they do not hang properly or they bag in front, or, worse 
still, draw across the upper part when the unfortunate wearer sits 
down, and thus displays an extent of boot tops not consistent with 
modesty or with the effectiveness of the toilet. The deceitfulness of 
the modern skirt is unequaled. To the anxious wearer who views 
herself by the hour at the imminent risk of dislocating her neck, as, 
with glass in hand, she strives " to see how the thing sets in the back," 
it may appear to be the perfection of style, only to disprove all its 
promised excellences at the first step. To be sure, a good deal de- 
pends upon the wearer herself, and if she stalk with a drum major's 
stride or a grenadier's step, she may expect that her skirt will reflect 
the swing and the sway of every motion, at the same time sawing 
the uppers of her shoes across until they are worn into slits. 

Then there is the pocket— or rather, there is not the pocket, for who 
is so bold as to assert that she can put her hand into her pocket with- 
out a moment's hesitation? In these days such a feat is not to be 
accomplished. The pocket is always the illusive quantity in a dress. 
First of all, nearly every dressmaker will declare that there is no 
place for it, that it will spoil the garment to seek to insert it, that the 
skirt will never hang so well afterwards. If, in concession to the ur- 
gent demand that a pocket should be provided, it is always tucked 
away somewhere so that it will not show, nor ever be found — at least, 
such is the experience of many a woman. 

I was going across the Bay one morning. As I stepped up to the 
little window to purchase my ticket I saw a lady standing a little to 
one side making frantic attempts to find her pocket. She made fren- 
zied clutches at her back draperies, she thrust her hand in and out 
the pleats along the side of her dress, but all to no purpose. I, hav- 
ing been in a similar plight myself, proffered my assistance. " I am 
so vexed," gasped the lady, " but I can't find my pocket; I never had 
the dress on before, and I'm sure I've no idea where the opening is." 
" Perhaps there is no pocket in the skirt," I suggested. "Oh, yes, 
there is," she assured me, "for my purse is in it." Then we had 
another hunt for it, but with no better success than before. I offered 
to pay her fare for her, but she refused to permit me, saying that she 
had a commutation ticket, and that the company should not make 
an extra cent out of her, or through her. So I left her still hunting 
for her pocket, for, as the last bell had rung, and 1 could not afford to 
lose my boat, I hastened aboard. That old nursery rhyme of " Lucy 
Locket lost her pocket, Jennie Fisher found it," shows that, even in 
the days of Mother Goose, ladies had some little trouble with this 
most useful and necessary part of a woman's dress. 

But hard as it is to find a pocket amid the drapery of a dress while 
it is upon the wearer, that difficulty is as nothing to the exasperat- 
ing search for the pocket of a dress that is hanging up in the closet. 
To talk calmly about such an experience is almost beyond the 
powers of one who has so suffered. The confidence with which the 
attack is opened, the feverish haste, the scurrying amidst the folds, 
the perspiring indignation, as the bag of the pocket can be firmly felt 
on the under side, while the opening still eludes the searching hand, 
the utter abandonment to the excitement of the chase, which ulti- 
mately results in the dress's being dragged down from its hook and 
flung upon the bed, or taken by the bottom, turned upside down, and 
the contents of the pocket shaken out upon* the floor. All this is as 
familiar to a woman as that parallel experience is to the man who 
finds himself on his doorstep late at night, with his keys in his 
"other trowsers pocket." As to the length of the skirts, formerly 
the contract of street sweeping, though not formally signed , sealed, and 
delivered, like a legal document, was let out to the ladies who wore 
long trains. They performed their work of removing the rubbish 
from our thoroughfares with commendable zeal. Frequently some 
woman was so lacking in the proper public spirit as not to be "willing 
to perform her part in cleaning the highways. Instead, she carefully 
held up her dress. At least she thought that she had it in a good 
firm grip, but ten to one she was grasping only the drapery of her 
overskirt, while the train was grandly sweeping along. A laughable 
self-delusion entirely owing to the skirt. 

The long dresses have been banished, but the opportunities for 
self-delusion are as great as ever. It is now not unusual to make a 
false skirt. Every woman knows what this is, and it is no longer 
considered a disgrace to wear one. When it was first introduced, it 
was for the purpose of eking out a scanty pattern, and thus making 
the suit more pretentious than it could otherwise have been with the 
limited amount of material at command. Now a variety of reasons 
keep it in vogue, one of the chief being that by it a walking costume 



can be made much lighter than with the skirt of the full material. 
Still, no woman is willing to have it show; no woman ever thinks 
that hers does show. But the wind is no respector of persons, and 
when the treacherous " tackings " give way and let down the loup- 
ings, the false skirt appears. It seems superfluous to advise any one 
to make the false skirt of a fabric of the same color as the material 
composing the dress, but from the number of contrasting effects seen 
whenever the wind blows, it is needed by not a few. 

Then there is the placket-hole, which, frequently eluding the 
vigilance of hook and eye, gapes open in a most unseemly way, dis- 
playing the bustle. Why the manufacturers of that apparently 
indispensable adjunct of a woman's dress should so frequently in- 
close it in a bright pink envelope is a mystery solvable only by them- 
selves; but a pink bustle, peeping out of a placket-hole, is a sight to 
make the Venus de Medici more ashamed of the modern human form 
than even that graceful female is at present. 

As for underskirts, one who knows declares that we American 
women do not wear enough of them, nor of the right kind. An 
j attempt has been made by those eccentric searchers for novelties in 
J Europe to discard the extra skirt and the chemise, and to adopt the 
combination garment; but a lady who is properly dressed— so saith 
my authority — will never discard either skirt or chemise. A French 
girl's trosseau is necessarily an expensive and complicated affair, if 
for no other reason that it must include so great a number of skirts. 
A Frenchwoman of the upper class in winter generally wears a little, 
short skirt of silk, lined with cotton between the two surfaces. This 
is the first skirt which she puts on when attiring herself. It adds 
nothing to her figure— that is, has no bulk to speak of— butisa highly 
important factor in keeping her warm. Over this she wears another 
skirt of light moreen, and over that one of plush, which may be very 
elegant, costing, perhaps, as much as $45. Besides these may be worn 
a skirt of light taffetas silk, trimmed at the bottom with ruffles or 
edged with lace. For the demi-season, and for summer, the heavier 
fabrics give place to garments of silk and batiste. 

Another great mistake, says the same person, which Americans 
make is the wearing of white underclothes in winter, particularly of 
white muslin skirts, which do not conform to the requirements of 
warmth or of cleanliness, especially upon a rainy day. 

The same authority insists that it is not in good form to wear all 
the skirts under the corset, a practice which is very prevalent at the 
present time. Thereby a lady loses the aid which the skirt should 
lend to her shape, and, to supply the deficiency, has recourse to a 
bustle. The proper way for a skirt to be made requires a gored or 
yoked front, which will slope away to the back, rising upon the hips 
until the front is much shorter than the rest of the skirt. The front 
must fit under the hook of the corset clasp below the waist-line, and 
the back at the middle of the waist has just enough gathers to make 
a pretty fullness to hold out the skirt of the dress. Some such skirts 
have been seen in San Francisco. There should be more of them. 
Pi Verkon. 

OTTIR, 

GREAT ANNUAL CLEARANCE SALE ! 



We begin the New Year with a Clearance Sale that eclipses all previous 
sales in the great variety aud desirability of the goods displayed and the 
SWEEPING REDUCTIONS FROM REGULAR VALUES at which they are 
offered. This cut embraces EVERY ARTICLE IN OUR MAMMOTH 
STOCK, and no person should fail to visit our stores aud examine the goods 
and prices during the sale. 

Extraordinary Reductions 



Ladies' Cloaks, Wraps and Jackets, Silks, Vel- 
vets, Black Dress Goods, Colored Dress 
Goods, Laees, Ribbons, Gloves, Hosiery, 
Underwear, Gents' Furnishings, 
House Furnishings, etc. 




MARKET AND JONES STREETS, 

SAN FRANCISCO. fjan. 5. 



.fan. & 1889 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



A PROBLEM FOR MALTHUS. 
A somewhat novel proposition— novel, thai i^. from the present 
■tandpointol aikber anedacated or scientific thought— baa been ad- 
ranced \<y a monitor "t the medical profession, ba?lng for it- basta 
Ihe Idea that, as ■ matter ol physiological mot, and looking al the 
question merely from a physiological point of view, man— thai i> to 
say, the ordinary human being, has no business to 'lie at all. In 
Other words, thai the Iota] cessation of onr energies, which we have 
come to denominate death, la due, not to any inherent morbific prin- 
ciple In the human system p« m, but simply to an active infraction 

or passive disregard Of the natural laws which govern that system. 

The srgumenl made by the gentleman in question is, to say the least, 
Ingenious, and consists, in round terms, in the Belf-evident proposition 
thai it the supply of the physical system was kept exactly equal to Its 
waste the result could not fail to be the unlimited endurance of that 
system* accidents, of course, excepted. In support of this proposi- 
tion, he adduces the statistical fact that within the past fifty years 
the average term of human life, under normal conditions, lias in- 
Creased utHMit six years— a fact attrihutable, no doubt, to the im- 
proved hygienic methods Which have come into pretty general prac- 
tice within that tune; and. from this demonstration, goes on to 
postulate that if the same ratio is kept up, it will be merely a ques- 
tion of time when the life of man will he extended to thousands of 
years, and that, with an eternity of time, his life will also be eternal. 
The theory is certainly a pretty one, but what about the practice? 
To apportion the consumption of food with such a degree of nicety as 
to exactly counterbalance the waste of tissue in the body for each 
day. with the further proviso that the alimentary substances used 
shall be of the particular character requisite to repair the particular 
kind of loss— brain, muscle, nerve, or what not — which the body has 
sustained, would of course demand such an exercise of care and dis- 
crimination as are not to be found in ordinary mortals. But conced- 
ing the possibility of the theory, and the practicability of its success- 
ful exercise, what would become of the human race? Even at the 
present normal rate of increase we are told that before another cen- 
tury is over the population of these United States will have reached 
six hundred millious, while the population of other countries will 
naturally have increased in a ratio proportioned to their economic 
Conditions. Such being the case, it is easy to see that two hundred 
years from now, since population increases by squares, if no extran- 
eous circumstances intervene — such as wars, pestilences or famines — 
to counteract this rate of increase, the world will not be able to sup- 
port its surplus population. New methods of life will, doubtless, be 
devised to meet such exigencies, and the pessimistic predictions of 
Malthus fail of fulfilment. Yet. in view of the outlook, fascinating 
as the subject of longevity certainly is to the individual, such an ex- 
tension of it would be anything but a blessing to the race in general. 



SHALL WOMEN PROPOSE. 

The question of " women proposing" seems to be occupying sev- 
eral prominent minds, judging from an article which appeared quite 
recently. Well, why in the name of common sense shouldn't they, 
if tbey want to? Who has made the unwritten law that concedes 
the privilege entirely to the men, so that a woman, in the eyes of the 
majority, forfeits her claim to delicacy of feeling, modesty and even 
self respect if she venture to take the matter in her own hands and 
say: " I love you? " I am a woman, with no desire to ask the mo- 
mentous question of any man, yet I hold that women may, without 
doing violence to any of their finer feelings, take the initiative in this 
matter if it is their wish. How many novelists lead us through page 
after page of woe and despair simply because, in the first chapter, the 
heroine had not the courage to call back the hero and tell him he 
need not go to India or South America? I fancy if we could read the 
unwritten story of many a solitary maid or bachelor it would be a 
tale of single blessedness ( ? ) for want of a seasonable word spoken by 
her. Of my own knowledge I cite instances where circumstances 
peremptorily forbidding the man to speak, the girl aware that hap- 
piness if united, or misery if parted, awaited them, grasped her 
courage firmly and "proposed," with what result those knowing 
their happy wedded life can tell. 

Why, pray tell me, should man have the exclusive right of inflict- 
ing upon a woman, at any time or place he may wish, the story of 
his affections? — thereby causing her, if she doesn't want him, to 
feel— well, if not immensely bored, decidedly un comfortable, espec- 
ially if he hints darkly at early death should she be obdurate. We 
are taught to believe, and rightly so, that a man pays a woman the 
greatest of compliments when he offers her himself (depends a great 
deal on the man, sometimes); but it is not supposed to be a laugh- 
able affair, nor one to be lightly considered. Then why not show the 
same consideration if the position is reversed. A woman, surely, has 
a right to the same courtesy and delicacy t hat a man expects at such 
a time. Fancy, though, having a dear creature tell you he " will be 
your brother!" " But," says one, " itissounmaidenly." I hold not. 
The woman I have in mind is neither flirt nor adventuress— such 
make their own rules. Let a true-hearted, whole-souled woman, 
who knows that upon her action rests the lifelong happiness of her- 
self and the man who loves her, but who dares not, or may not, tell 
her so, step over the line drawn by society at large, and he will bless 
her forever for having been brave enough to 
" Put it to the truth. 
To win or lose it all." 



WET WEATHER GOODS! 

HEADQUARTERS 

UMBRELLAS, Rubber' Clothing— All weights. 

Gossamers and Light-weights this season a 

Specialty. 
SILK UMBRELLAS— With natural wood, gold 

and silver handles. 
OUR RUBBER CLOTHINC this season, as in the 

past, was manufactured expressly for us by the 

Goodyear Rubber Co. , and we stand prepared 

to warrant each and every garment Strictly 

Rain Proof. 
UMBRELLAS— The most complete stock in San 

Francisco, from 40 cents upward. 
OVEECOATS FOB THE ZVEIXjULIOIsr. 

M. J. Flavin & Co., 

92-4 TO 928 JVC-A-IEaiKITfiT STREET, 
And Cor. Kearny and Commercial Streets. [Dec. 29. 

ARMAND CAILLEAU, 

Leading Cloak and Suit House 

OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

48 GEARY STREET, - _^_ - Corner Grant Avenue. 

Mr. Cailleau is now exhibiting the finest of European goods and of the 
latest patterns, selected by himself while abroad. 

ULSTERS, WRAPS, JACKETS, 

TEA GOWNS, ETC. 

SEALETTE BY THE YARD, THE CHEAPEST IN THE CITY. 

■ Special care given to country customers. [8ept. 29. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 

-A. CJTTIET HOME, 

CENTRALLY LOCATED, 

FORTHOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION. 

April 7.1 WM. B. HOOPER, Manager. 

Charles R. Einselen. Louis J. Tschurr. 

DELMQNICO RESTAURANT MD CONFECTIONERY, 

8 to 14 O'Farrell Street, San Francisco. 
Balls, Parties, Weddings, etc., Furnished at the Shortest Notice. Private 
Apartments for Families and Banquets. 

Telephone 808. 

TSCHURR & EINSELEN. Proprietors. 



manning's 
Restaurant and Oyster Grotto, 

14 and 15 Powell Street, opposite Baldwin Hotel. 

Oysters in any style delivered to all parts of the City. 

Estimates Furnished for Supplying Banquets, Dinners and Suppers. 

[Dee. 25.1 

CAMPI'S RESTAURANT, 

33, 35, 35JJ O'FARRELL STREET, Near Stockton, 

Adjoining Phelan's Building. 



SARTORI & 



FANTINA, Proprietors. 
| Dee. 15.1 



MT. VERNON COMPANY, BALTIMORE. 

. The undersigned having been appointed AGENTS FOR THE 

PACIFIC COAST for the sale of the manufactures of above company, have 
now in store : 

SAIL DUCK— ALL NUMBERS; 
HYDRAULIC— ALL NUMBERS; 
DRAPER AND WAGON DUCK, 
From 30 to 120 inches wide; and a Complete Assortment of All Qualities 
28%-INCH DUCK, FROM 7 OZS. TO 15 OZS., Inclusive. 

MURPHY, GRANT & CO. 

Complete sets of Artotypes can be had at the News Letter omce, Flood 
Building, corner Market and Fourth streets. Price, ten cents each. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 5, 1889. 




KHE Carleton Opera Company are making merry at the 
Baldwin with Mynheer Jan, a serio-comic opera, written by 
Harry Paulten and Mostyn Tedde, and composed by Edward 
Jakobowski, the composer of Erminie. Mynheer Jan is bright 
and tuneful, with a good deal of rather stolid Dutch humor 
in its dialogue and action, its humor frequently reaching the grotesque 
at first impulse, though relieved therefrom almostinstantly in several 
instances by a quick and natural transition. It has as much love- 
making as Boccaccio or A Night in Venice, which for the most part is 
done naturally and in order, though in one instance we seem to be 
transferred to an American leap-year, wherein a Spanish Belva Lock- 
wood wooes a widower who trusts his son to woo for him a younger 
woman, which young woman, like Priscilla, asks him, " Why don't 
you speak for yourself, John ?" The complications are not at all in- 
tricate, indeed are rather on the surface and transparent; but they 
are worked out with due regard to the ludicrous, and serve their pur- 
pose. It is easy enough to see from the beginning what the ending 
will be; but we watch, with more or less amusement, the sayings 
and doings of the various people on their way to the " round-up " 
with as much interest as though it were less plausible. 

» » * * # 

Mynheer Jan deals with the fortunes and misfortunes of the Daisy 
Guild, ostensibly a social organization, but really a political one, 
looking to the expulsion of the Spaniards from their rule of Holland, 
about the middle of the sixteenth century. Karl, a student, who is 
President of the guild, is personated by W. T. Carlton, who realizes 
the character consistently, and sings with due dignity the music that 
falls to his lot, notably that of a patriotic song, " Liberty or Death," 
in the first act. Mr. Carlton is a true artist, inasmuch as he takes 
a character subordinate to others, for the sake of the artistic success 
of the whole. C. H. Drew, as Hans, the buffoon of the Daisy Guild, is 
exceedingly funny throughout, notably in the second act, where he 
personates the character of a Spanish noble, but gets hopelessly en- 
tangled in his butcher's talk and swagger; and in the last act, where, 
to escape his pursuers, he assumes the disguise of a scarecrow, he 
makes no end of mirth, especially in his absurd topical song, wherein 
he sings of to-day's doings in an era nearly four-hundred years 
earlier. But this has come to be considered funny, even in the region 
of opera comique, though really it should be relegated to its proper 
sphere of burlesque. Clara Lane, as Katrina, is simply delicious, and 
uses her lustrous dark eyes in a way that will play sad havoc with 
the front rows if kept up. Her form is rather petite, her manner 
frank and winning, and her singing tones clear and thrilling, with 
enough of earthly fullness and flavor in them to render the en- 
chantment complete. In her little love duet with Francis, early in 
the opera, she made her first success, and it was a decided one. The 
character of Francis was taken by J. C. Taylor, and was sustained 
admirably throughout. J. K. Murray, as General Bombalo, Alice 
"Vincent as Camilla, Clara Wisdom as Donna Tralara, and E. de 
Mesa, as Don Diego, were all clever and acquitted themselves credit- 
ably. The marching of the Amazonian Guard was done admirably, 
though the colors of the costumes did not always blend harmoniously. 
As a whole, the opera may be commended as among the best of the 
day, while the company giving it is a much better one than that of 
last season. Tlie Queen's Lace Handkerchief will be next week's at- 
traction. 

***** 

Mazulm has made a great hit at the Grand Opera House, where the 
dancing, marching, trapeze business, and the combination between 
Humply Dumpty and the Black Crook make a merry melange of color 
and character, music and magic, that unite in affording a delightful 
evening's entertainment. The children will be out in full force at the 
matinee to-day. The Black Crook will follow. 

***** 

At the Bush Street Theatre M. B. Leavitt's European Novelties 
Company continue to good houses, the programme being changed 
for the second week. This evening's performance ends the caie t of 
the " Old Bush," after which it will be closed for three weeks, and in 
the interim will be entirely renovated, and re-open Saturday evening, 
January 2G, with Lydia Thompson's English Burlesque Company, 
which, we are assured, the San Francisco public will find has also 
been renovated and rejuvenated. 

***** 

Jeffreys Lewis and her company appear during their second week 
at the Standard Theater in La Belle RusseAn which this actress made 
her greatest success a few years ago. Miss Lewis makes the charac- 
ter of Geraldine unnecessary coarse; yet her success in the subtler 
phases of the character are undeniably strong and effective — more so 
than in those scenes where passion asserts itself. The company ren- 
ders fair support. Led Astray will follow next week. 



A Night in Venice continues to good business at the Tivoli 

Opera House, it being well staged and well sung, and bidding fair to 

draw as long as the management feel like keeping it on. 

****** 

A Noble Rogue keeps the boards at the Alcazar Theatre, where the 

strong melodramatic flavor of the piece suits the audiences that flock 

thither as though by instinct. 

****** 

The fifth orchestral matinee occurred at Irving Hall on Friday 
afternoon, December 28th, when the following programme was 
rendered: 1. Marche Hongroise, Schubert, orchestrated by Franz 
Liszt. 2. 2d Concerto. Saint-Saens; (a) Allegro Scherzando; (b) 
Presto Finale — Mr. Miguel Espinoza. 3. Aria (North Star), Meyer- 
beer, with flute duett obligato— Mme. Julie Rosewald. 4. Siegfried 
Idylle, Wagner. 5. Gypsy Dance, Heidingsfeld. 6. Prayer (com- 
posed in lo'84), Durante— Mme. Julie Roseward, with violin obligato 
by Mr. F.Stark. 7. Scenes Pittoresque(suite), Massenet; (a) March; 
(b) Air de Ballet; (c) Angelus ; (d) Fete Bohemia. These matinees 
Mr. Rosewald deserves the thanks of local music lovers for his most 

artistic entertainmeuts. 

***** 

Mr. Rosewald's last orchestral matinee will take place Friday, Jan- 
uary 11th. at Irving Hall. Compositions of local writers will be the 
feature. Mr. Rosewald announces a second series of these admirable 
concerts to begin on Friday, January 25th, and every alternate Fri- 
day thereafter. We wish him success in the enterprise. 

* * * * * * * 

Americans have the reputation, the world over, of taking insults 
unflinchingly, especially if the slights are offered to our people as a 
nation, or to sections of them as communities. Even weak nations 
insult us studiedly, down to Mexico and Hayti. But the most das- 
tardly ones leveled at us are those on an alleged art level. The Lang- 
try-Gebhardt nastiness was one that the theatre-going public pocket- 
ed greedily, while the Jersey Lily herself pocketed coin thereby. So 
with the Kyrle Bellew and Mrs. Potter affair. The Sarah Bernhardt 
scandals are older, and there was more of an atmosphere of art about 
her. Then came the most vile exhibition of all — the Coquelin-Ha- 
ding alleged imbroglio. Was there an imbroglio? Assuredly not. 
What was it, then? Only an " advertising racket." It is implied by 
these unprincipled managers and small-calibred press agents that 
Americans will not patronize a dramatic artist unless he or she is be- 
clouded or besmirched to such a degree as to be notorious; that their 
attention cannot be attracted withont the carrion in the air to at- 
tract their buzzard smell. Is this so? The foul columns of the 
sensational dailies are to blame largely, and the jackals who adver- 
tise the " dramatic artists " scent the game and run it down for the 
lion-managers. But is all this tilth necessary to advertise these 
people? They say yes, and proceed to debauch the public prints with 
stories of scandals and alleged quarrels, gaining their selfish ends 
through their deliberate insults to American theatre-goers. Is it 
necessary to do this? Did Edwin Booth gain his eminence thus? Did 
Lawrence Barrett?- Did John McCuIlough? Did Mary Anderson? 
Did Salvini? By no means! Out upon the disgraceful custom! 
When managers and their agents come again, attracting attention by 
these questionable means, resent the insult by staying at home, and 
letting their " artists " severely alone. One such "artist" sneaking 
home like a whipped cur, because the American people have resented 
his manager's insults by letting him severely alone, would have a 
mighty good effect in clearing the air of the scent of carrion. 

Emma Nevada was recently paid $500 to sing in the Gilroy Club in 

London. 

***** 

Louise Coleman, a promising young lady pupil of Julia Melville- 
Snyder, will appear in the arduous role of Marco in The Marble Heart, 
at Saratoga Hall, on January 20th. Miss Coleman has marked his- 
trionic ability, which her teacher, Mrs. Snyder, has developed to the 
best advantage, and her friends anticipate for her a marked success. 

One of the acknowledged belles of San Francisco, whom that 
city claims, although New York has an earlier right to her recogni- 
tion, Miss Rosa Barreda, is at the Barrett House, as the guest of Mrs. 
McDowell, widow of the lamented General Irwin McDowell. Miss 
Barreda is the daughter of the unfortunate Feruando Barreda, who 
was once Peruvian Minister to this country, aad who built the re- 
nowned Barreda villa at Newport, which became later the property of 
Mr. William Astor. Miss Barreda, in whose veins flows.it is said, 
the blood of the Inca kings, was summoned suddenly to New York to 
the bedside of her nearest friend. Miss Helen McDowell, who lies ill 
with pneumonia. Eager as are the many friends of the Barreda 
family to welcome her to a New York winter, she steadfastly refuses 
to leave her friend's side until assured that danger is past. 

-N. Y, Truth. 

The daily consumption of needles in this country is said to be 
4,200,000, most of which come from Redditch, England. 



The courteous learn the courtesy from the discourteous. 

McAlester & Jones, Real Estate Agents and Rent Collectors : Office 
422 Montgomery street. The best regulated office in the city. Men of experi. 
ence, having studied the wants of landlords and tenants for 28 years; reli- 
able, prompt and responsible in the management of real estate, renting, 
selling and collecting, and taking full charge of property at lowest rates. 



Jan. 



1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



13 




^" T is easy enough at this Lime to tell why the contest between Mo- 
l AuliflV and Jackson resulted aa ii did. it is easy enough to say 

( J thai M;-AiiliHe was not in condition, end that his opponent was, 

and the Facts can be summed up in a very few sentences, Joe 

UcAuUfie i s no boxer, and during the entire twenty four rounds 

he made no attempt whatever to use his left hand. Jaekson, who, 

for so heavy a man, is remarkably agile, devoted himself to dodging 

McAuliriVs slOW swinging right-h:inders, meanwhile chopping the 
Californian's body, sapping his store of wind and bruising his face at 
in-lighting. Jackson did wonderful work at this sort of righting. lie 
has not yet shown that he has anything like McAulitVe's great hitting 
power, but still we are inclined to believe that we have not seen him 
at his best. As for McAulirfe, he was plainly off that night, His 
plucky challenge to the dusky gentleman from the Antipodes is 
ample proof of his confidence in himself. If he gets the match ar- 
ranged it is safe to say that he will train more carefully and give more 
attention to boxing than he has ever done before. A six months' 
tutelage with the gloves, under any first-class boxing instructor 
would be of great benefit to him. Luckily, the result of this con- 
test has not proved a lasting discouragement to him, but rather as a 
lesson, so that the Californian is not to be considered, by any means, 
out of the race for the world's championship. 

***** 

It is remarkable how quick the victory of Jackson has made the 
Kilrain-Mitchell coterie of sluggers hedge on all propositions to fight. 
Kitrain does not want to face Jackson at all, and Mitchell's proposi- 
tion to the California Athletic Club that this wind champion 
be allowed ?1,000 for training expenses, in addition to the liberal 
purse offered, is simply preposterous, and is made with the object of 
preventing a possible defeat. Sullivan's latest ultimatum, which is to 
the effect that he will not fight a colored man nor face any pugilist 
who has, is downright idiocy. When a man claims the champion- 
ship of the world, as Sullivan does, or has the belt, as Kilrain has, he 
should be prepared to meet, and should meet, any one in the world, 
be the new-comer a white man, a negro, a Chinaman, a Malay or 
what not. If Sullivan draws the color-line on Jackson it will be 
through cowardice, and if he will not meet McAuIiffe the same cause 
—cowardice — will hold good. Personally, no sane man would think 
of choosing Sullivan before Jackson. Sullivan's skin is white, but 
his heart is of quite another color, and he is, moreover, a brutal bully. 
Jackson's skin is dark but his heart is white, and his manners are 
those of a gentleman. Should Sullivan wrest the belt from Kilrain 
and then will not meet Jackson, the Antipodean, in our opinion, 
would be justified in resorting to a street battle to get satisfaction. 
******* 

The prime pugilistic attraction of the early part of this month is 
the lightweight battle between George Mulholland, the lightweight 
champion of the Colonies, and Billy Mahan, which will be decided 
next Wednesday evening at the Golden Gate Club's gymnasium. 
Everything thus far points to an excellent battle. The men are train- 
ing, and will both be in tine trim on the night of the match. Thus 
far Mahan is the favorite, he being recognized as a fine fighter, while 
not much is known of Mulholland, except by his record, and by the 
word of Peter Jackson that he is a good one. Interest also is taken 
in the Carroll-Blakelock lightweight battle to come off at the Cali- 
fornia Club on the 29th. Carroll is in training at Joe Dieves', and 
Blakelock is also doing considerable work. Should Carroll win, he 
will challenge Jem Carney for the championship of the world. 
***** 

Some oue should go the rounds and get up a subscription with 
which to purchase a substantial testimonal, to be presented to Man- 
ager Hinchman of the Bay District Track. That gentleman has 
resolved not to permit the " bookies " to run stands on the grounds 
hereafter, and all pools are to be sold by auction. This is a step 
which is worthy of all commendation, and it may be said to be one of 
the benefits that have arisen out of a portion of the somewhat acri- 
monious war of last fall between Lucky Baldwin and the late David 
McClure. Manager Hinchman's estimation of the character of the 
bookmakers is eminently just. He says that these gentry are in the 
habit of putting up jobs and dictating how races shall be run. If 
Manager Hinchman did not know this before, he has been made 
painfully aware of it during this winter's meeting, he having found 
it necessary to suspend one jockey and warn others. If Mr. Hinch- 
man will impress on his memory forever that a bookmaker is gener- 
ally a small-fry jobber he will do much to restore the confidence of 
the public in turf affairs. The races of the winter season have thus 
far proved moderately supcessful. 

***** 

This evening representatives of the Olympic, Columbia and Uni- 
versity football teams will meet a,t the Olympic Club and organize a 
league. They will offer a trophy valued at $100 to the winner of the 
championship this year, and will adopt rules which will govern all 
congests. The inter-collegiate rules will probably be chosen though 



there are those w lio advocate the Rugby rules, A schedule n I 
he arranged, and everything put in readiness for the season. If tin- 
New Zealand an i Scotoh teams just organized desire representation 

in the league the.V can have it. provided that they are willing to play 
under the rules that permit tackling and running with the ball. 

The California Leiigue players have never taken kindly to a purely 

kicking game, such as the Scotch players here like. 

****** 

1). K. McNeil aud Frank Mall are doing well in their preparation 
for the nine days go-as-you-please tramp, which begins at the l'avilion 
on [February 21st. James Albert, the ex-champion, Vint, Hart, Nore- 
mac, Ilerty and others have written that they will participate. The 
managers intend to offer a special prize in ease any of the contestants 
exceed 000 mile?. Besides this attraction there will be a sprinting 
track in the budding, and there will be races in which Harry Bethune, 
Archie McComb, Skinner and others of that ilk will appear. 



"|Did you mala New Year's calls, Joe? " " yes." " Have a good time? " 
"Captured all the u'irls. I was so stunningly arrayed, you see. Everything 
I had on was from .] VV. CarmnuyV, 25 Kearny street." 



SPECIAL-BALDWIN THEATRE-SPECIAL 

Handsomest Theatre in America. Absolutely Safe. 

Lessee and Proprietor, Mr. Al. Hayman | Acting Manager, Alfred Bouvier 

Every Evening This Week (except Sunday). Matinee Saturday at 2. The 

Brilliantly Successful CAKLETON OPEKA COMPANY, in their latest 

successful comic opera, 

Produced in a Regal Mauuer by MR. CARLETON and His Admirable 
Compauy. During the Carletou Season a different Opera will be presented 
each week. 

Next Week, commencing Monday next, January 7th— Superb Revival of 
the Great Success, The 
QTCrZEIEJirsr'S LACE HAUDKBBCHIEF. 

Sale of seats for neit week commences this morning at 9 o'clock. 
[Jan. 5.] 



GRAND OPERA HOUSE, 

Under the Direction of Mr. Al. Hayman 

Second Week! Amazing Success! Every Evening (including Sunday). 
Matiuee Saturday at 2. Theatre Crowded Nightly. Hundreds Turned 
Away. The Greatest Spectacular Pantomime ever seen in Sau Francisco. 
Imre Kiralfy's 

mt-a-ZttIjIm: i 

See the Great Ongar Sisters, the Dare Brothers, Bibb and Bobb, the Beauti- 
ful Ballets. Remember: Prices— 25c, 50c, 75c, $1. No higher. 
Secure your seats and avoid the crush. [Jan. 5. 



ALCAZAR THEATRE. 

Geo. Wallenrod Sole Manager 

Every Eveniug at 8. Matiuee Saturdayat 2. Prices, 25 and 50c. 
.A. nSTOIBIILIEi ZROa-TTZE. 
Characters by Geo. Osboume, L. R. Stockwell and the Alcazar Theatre Com- 
pauy. 
Evening Prices— 25, 50 aud 75c. [Jan. 5. 

BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

M. B. Leavitt .Proprietor | Chas. P. Hall Manager 

Last Nights. Last Matinee Saturday at 2. M. B. LEAVITT'S GRAND 
EUKOPE AN NOVELTIES! Overwhelming Success ! Positive Change of 
Programme. 

Sunday Evening. January 6th, Last Performance of the Great Novelty 
Compauy, and Last Night of the "Old Bush," which will be temporarily 
closed for important alterations, reopening Saturday, January 26th, with 
the LYDIA THOMPSON BURLESQUE COMPANY. [Jan. 5. 



TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Kreling Bros Sole Proprietors aud Managers 

Overwhelming Success! Second Week! The Best Performance in Town. 

Until further notice, 

.A. E"IGHT TITST "VZEJSTiaiE I 

A delightful operetta, by Johaun Strauss. Crowded, Enthusiastic Audiences 

Every Night. Beautiful Venice Illuminated ! The Doves of Sau Mare— 

Introducing M'lle Garetta, with her flock of Wonderfully Trained Pigeons. 

Magnificent Scenery, Costumes aud Appointments, 'iraud Chorus and 

Orchestra. 
OUR POPULAR PRICES— 25c and 50c. [Jan. 5. 

SCHOOL OF DESIGN. 

This school will open on MONDAY, January 7th. Tuition in Drawing 
Class, Antique and Portrait, $24 per term; tuition in Painting Class, $30 per 
term; Saturday Class for Public School pupils aud others able to attend 
Saturdays only, $4 per month; Life Class, Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays 
and Fridays. For further particulars apply at the school, 430 Pine street. 

Jan. 5.J J. H. MARTIN, Secretary. 

HAND-MADE SHOES, $8.00. 




FROM THOMAS', LONDON, 

15 New Montgomery St., 

Under Ctraud Hotel. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 5, 1889. 



THE SO-CALLED LABOR PROBLEM. 



For some occult purpose or other, which we confess is too obscure 
for us to determine, we are being told by the Democratic organ that 
California is in the throes of a" crisis " caused by a dearth of labor. 
To our local readers it is unnecessary to say that there is not a word 
of truth in the allegation. They know the facts, and comprehend 
how totally different they are from what they are being represented 
to be. To our numerous readers in the East and abroad it is proper 
to say that the organ is conjuring up a condition of things that has 
no real existence in even its own imagination. If its object be not to 
secure the early repeal of the Chinese Exclusion Act, it is impossible 
to tell what else it can be. There is not only no dearth of labor at 
present, but there is not likely to be any in the near future. The 
grain and fruit crops of the year just ended were gathered from an 
enlarged area, and were exceptionally bountiful, yet no serious diffi- 
culty was experienced in harvesting and handling them. There is no 
discernable reason why the state of affairs during 1889 should be 
changed for the worse. Indeed, there are some signs that it will 
be improved. If we have suffered at all, it has not been from a lack 
of labor, but from a bad distribution of it. It was barely sufficient in 
some portions of the State, whilst it was redundant in others. 
Already there are agencies at work to cure this defect. The railroads 
are co-operating in the movement, and hereafter exceptional facilities 
will be afforded laborers to reach the places where their services are 
most in demand. Then, again, the success of last year's experiment 
with boys as fruit gatherers will result in their offering themselves in 
far larger numbers this year. The Chinese are still with us to the 
number of probably 100,000, and there is no chance of their number 
decreasing; indeed, it is still being added to very materially. Every 
steamer to Victoria arrives full of Chinese laborers, for whom there 
is no employment in British Columbia. They undoubtedly reach 
the United States, and the immigration by this route is pretty sure 
to go on increasing all the time. 

No steps are being taken to patrol or otherwise guard our bound- 
aries, and none will be taken unless extreme pressure be brought to 
bear for that purpose upon the new administration. Perhaps the 
action of the organ in laboring so hard to create an impression that 
more Chinese are needed, is to be accounted for by a desire to pre- 
vent a demand arising for a vigorous enforcement of the Exclusion 
Act on our borders. Then, if it succeeds, and the immigration comes 
flowing in as rapidly as ever, it will be said that that which is being 
done indirectly may as well be permitted directly, and the repeal of 
the Exclusion Act may well be expected as a consequenee. If the 
new generation of fruit growers are to be educated into a belief that 
without cheap Chinese labor their industry cannot thrive, and if Cali- 
fornia is to be induced to change her deliberate judgment as to the 
undesirability of an unchecked Chineseimmigration.all right, but let 
the issue be fairly and squarely raised, and let us understanding!}' 
comprehend whither we are drifting. It has cost us a long and weary 
struggle to wring an effective exclusion law from Congress. If we are 
to relax our grip upon that measure let us at least comprehend the 
why and the wherefore. No such falsehoods as that the fruit will rot 
on the trees, and the State return to cattle and sheep raising, ought 
to be tolerated on any pretense whatever. If it were true that fruit 
growing could not go on without a class of labor that can feed and 
house itself and work for half wages, it were better that, it should 
stop. But it is not true. There is money enough in fruit raising to 
pay everybody decently .and no good can come of trying to create a con- 
trary impression. It is a pity a wealthy organ cannot better employ 
itself than in disseminating such twaddle. 



NOW FOR THE CINCHING PROCESS. 
Sacramento 'will be in all its glory next week. Legislators are 
full of hope and expectancy. They are primed to the muzzle for a 
new appearance in an old r61e. More than one grip-sack is said to be 
chock full of cinch bills. The Boss is known to have recently enlarged 
his sack. The control of the Supervisors and Legislators is to be 
made to pan out rich enough to compensate for the loss of so many 
municipal offices with patronage and money in them. The fun is to 
be fast and furious, and may the father of mischief take care of the 
hindmost. In sober seriousness, the crop of cinch bills is to be more 
prolific than ever before. The question of the hour is as to the readi- 
ness of the intended victims to step up to the Capital and be cinched. 
The foreign insurance companies say they are not ready and never 
again will be. They declare they will abandon business and leave the 
State first. They admit that in the past twelve j'ears they have sent 
half a million to Sacramento to prevent hostile legislation. Legisla- 
tors who are on the make, laugh to scorn the idea that the enormous 
insurance business of California will be abandoned for any such 
reason. There will be at least a thousand bills introduced this session, 
and there will be little jokers in every one of them. Many of these 
will early succeed in drawing an amount of consideration that will 
cause them to slumber. Others will make a noise and cinch the 
animal almost in twain. It is a bad, shameful business all round. 
The time was when the newspaper correspondents could be relied upon 
to expose and light cinch bills, but we live in degenerate days. Like 
master like man. The boys say the proprietors do it. Many material 
interests will have reason to thank God for the adjournment of this 
Legislature. 



THE TARIFF IN THE SENATE. 
The present position of the tariff in the Senate demonstrates how 
little the late election campaign did to settle the question as to how 
best to reduce the revenue to the actual needs of an economically ad- 
ministered government. The c<m<iiti<>n which Cleveland described so 
forcibly still confronts the nation. The surplus that is needlessly 
taken from the pockets of the people is still piling up. The remedy 
provided by the Chicago platform was the abolition of the internal 
revenue, which meant free whisky, but that proposition would not 
stand the discussion of the campaign, and was practically abandoned. 
The Republicans finally rested their cause upon the tariff bill as it 
then stood in the Senate. At any rate that was the only proposition 
they at last squarely presented to the country. But now that the 
matter has to be taken up again for settlement, it appears that the 
Senate bill will not do at all. and that its passage can only be obtained 
by its being amended out of all recognition. Its principal feature is 
the fifty per cent, reduction of the sugar duties. Destroy thatfeature 
and the scheme goes all to pieces. Of the total proposed reduction of 
$70,000,000, that on sugar supplies nearly $50,000,000. Those figures 
render it clear that if sugar may not be touched, an entirely new 
schedule of tariff duties will have to be devised, and in thatcase what 
conies of the case presented for the approval of the country ? Senator 
Stanford, with earnest loyalty to the interests of his State, declares 
that the beet sugar industry must not be touched, and that he will 
not vote for the tariff if it is. Without his vote and those of his col- 
leagues from the Pacific Coast, the tariff cannot be carried. Its 
substantial abandonment is therefore a foregone conclusion. The 
same old condition confronts us. We are again face to face with the 
difficulty of reducing an enormous surplus without touching duties 
that are protective of some industry or other. The Republicans are 
pledged not to reduce any duty which has that effect, and yet they 
cannot let the surplus go on increasing at its present rate. They 
have got to do something, and therein consists their difficulty. It is 
not now a theory, but a necessity for action which confronts them. 
Cleveland's words will be quoted with increased force as time rolls 



CALIFORNIA IN LONDON. 

The proposition for an exhibition of Californian products in Lon- 
don is one that ought not to be either too readily accepted or re- 
jected. The idea is per se a good one. The products of this State will 
stand exhibiting anywhere. They have little to fear, but much to 
gain from the widest possible examination. Then, advertising is as 
good for the business of the many as it is for that of the individual. 
A big exhibition in London, exclusively devoted to California, would 
be a huge advertisement for our State. But therein lies the difficulty. 
It would have to be " a big thing." If it were not that it would be 
worse than a failure. It would not do to send a show that did not 
attract. It would be folly to enter into a competition that did not 
compete. London is full of attractions for townsmen as well as for 
country folk. Of course we could not in any case expect to surpass 
or even rival these, but their attractiveness would have in some de- 
gree to be the measure of ours. London may be said to be a city of 
exhibitions. The Colonies have Agents-General and abiding places 
there. They bid for immigration, and always have samples on hand 
to show what they can produce. Australia, in particular, has made 
fine displays. Her wines and fruits are well known and appreciated. 
With these we should have to compete. Italy has just made a good 
impression upon the Londoners with a local exhibition. It received 
very special countenance from the official classes for political reasons. 
Almost every product California could show was exhibited by Italy 
in perfection. Clearly, if we are to exhibit in London at all we must 
do so in a manner worthy of our glorious State. Are we prepared 
lor such an undertaking? It would seem not. Governor Waterman 
says the appropriation asked for ($250,000) is so excessive that he 
would veto it. If his view generally prevails the idea of an exhibition 
in the world's commercial capital had better be abandoned. A round 
million could be profitably employed in the enterprise. 



AS TO FRANCHISES. 
If the dailies would invariably and faithfully discuss the truth that 
is to be found on both sides of every question they would be more 
just and more influential for good than they are. Just now they are 
taking sides upon the question of granting franchises to certain cable 
roads. On one hand it is contended that as such roads as that to the 
Potrero is badly needed and runs through a comparatively sparsely 
populated district, all roads should be granted franchises for the long 
period of fifty years without cost or tax of any kind. On the other 
hand it is claimed that every road should, from the beginning, pay 
the city a minimum of two per cent, upon its gross earnings, whether 
a margin of profit be left to its stockholders or not. Neither propo- 
sition is sound. There are roads, like the one we have referred to, 
which cannot have too great consideration extended them, whilst 
there are others that can afford to pay. and ought to be made to pay 
liberally for their exclusive use of the city's streets. The franchises 
should carefully reserve to the city the right to exact a share of the 
profits in the future. We do not care to be specific as to the details, 
but the principle being established, any good lawyer could draft a 
clause for insertion in all charters that would enable the Municipality 
to deal with the cable roads as the future might justify. 



Jan. .-.. 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Lfi 





Hear (be Crier!" "What thedevll art thou?" 
one thai will play the devil, sir, » Ufa you." 

On the roof the rain is beating, and I hear the bitter wind 

Through the oak trees, moaning Badly, and 1 gather link by link. 
Prom the long chain "i experience trailing many years behind, 

Some pabulum to ponder on; with clouded brow I think 
01 those days when every morning in Its bosom held a BCheme 

01 riotous enjoyment, of dance or sail or walk, 
When Fair Alice was all love to me, and Maud was more than kind , ' 

Ami Geraldtne to waltzing preferred the quiet talk. 

My hair ia growing frosty and my heart is growing cold, 

And the girls I loved are married, with the babe upon the knee; 
They've forgotten now, oh, false ones, those merry days of old, 

Ami with that pusl they've buried all remembrance of me, 
But Alice, dark-eyed darling. 1 could tell a tale of you. 

Which your husband, seriooa matron, would hardly care to hear, 
When we parted and you crowned my brows with cypress and with 
rue. 

Though you kissed me. bidding me to trust the promise of the year. 

That promise has been false as you, and sitting all alone, 

A bachelor light-hearted, remote from social strife, 
I drink my grog and smoke my pipe, and thank the lord that you 

Were never, blest be Providence, predestined for my wife. 
I gaze into the blazing coals. I read a picture there 

Of the falsity ot married life, and thank the Lord that I 
Though wrinkles show upon my cheek and frost upon my hair, 

Shall remain a merry bachelor until the day I die. 

Miss Helen Winthrop. of Boston, was born with seven tongues. 
A young lady with seven tongues would be an addition to the sewing 
circle, providing, of course, that each tongue could exercise its func- 
tions independent of the other. But this Boston lady, with a sagacity 
which distinguishes the women of her village, wisely concluded that 
one tongue, which is often too much for the ordinary woman, was 
quite enough for her, and therefore had the other six removed. Now, 
I don't see why the satirists should lay so much stress upon the 
power of the female tongue. I can remember this moment in my 
list of acquaintance a dozen men who can talk more scandal in five 
minutes than the biggest gossip in the town in thirty, and that is be- 
cause they have the art of concentration. For, while the female 
gossip will waste lots of time in hints and insinuations, the male gos- 
sip goes directly to the point, and protests, with much profanity, that 
he saw the veiled lady go in the back door of the restaurant with a 
married gentleman, or the veiled gentleman skip into the hack with 
a married lady, or the heiress kiss the groom in the stable-yard, or 
any one of the many*ramifications of the scandal-monger. There is 
one lean rascal whom I love for his magnificent malice. The scoun- 
drel is a good feeder, too, but no fat sticks to his ribs. And when he 
has exhausted his list of living victims, this miscreant hies him to 
the cemetery, sits upon his father's grave and concocts lying solilo- 
quies upon the author of his being. 

I do think this poking fun at the American navy is altogether 
wrong. Now, it is but a short time since the whole formidable force 
of the Haytian Republic struck their flag to an American admiral. 
This keeping of the country on a war footing is all bosh, anyhow. 
It is certainly eminently proper that our naval officers should under- 
stand by a course at Annapolis how to splice the mainbrace, and our 
military officers the principles of battalion drill ; but beyond all these 
is the importance of good waltzing. It is a serious question among 
society leaders whether the naval or military branches of the service 
are the most expert in the waltz. Some contend that the waists of 
the naval officers, being more wasp-like, as a rule, than those of the 
military, they make, as a natural consequence, better time over the 
waxed Hoor. But I am inclined to doubt all this, for there is a fat- 
waisted artilleryman at Black Point who can waltz down any sylph 
in the other branch of the service. However, in these piping times 
of peace discussions of this nature are not fit for civilians, but should 
be more properly left to the Secretary of War and the Secretary of 
the Navy, within whose province they directly come. 

There is to be a convention of merchant tailors held in New York 
next month, and our tailors have appointed delegates to attend the 
same. There was a time I used to sympathize with tailors, and re- 
gard them as innocent beings, who were too often preyed upon by 
impecunious customers. I did not know then, which I do now, that 
the brigands have fifteen different prices per yard for every bolt of 
cloth in the shop. That they will show the same cloth over again 
and call it fifty cents a yard more on its second showing because of its 
superior quality, all of which the innocent layman swallows, fascin- 
ated by the steely eye of the lying tailor. Bring these matters up in 
your convention, gentlemen, and have an ordinance passed that every 
son of the sheers who transgresses shall be strangled with his own 
tape measure. 



NowTelemaohus, as New Year resolutions are In order,] beg to 
lay down a few points for your respectful consideration, and i will 
clothe them in doggerel so they may be easier <>i reniembraw e 

Do not endeavor to patcb up a matrh lal 

Nor do no niii, like Dr. Bartlett of the Bulletin, attempt to eal 

with your knife. 
Do not upon the hearts of discontented wives attempt to pour the 

healing balm, 
Or you may find yourself in the fix of OUT esteemed citizen, Mr. Bene- 

ca Augustus Swalrn. 

Do not wilfully assume a jag. but having the jag on look sad, almost 
to tears. 

This a fine old trick, ami is calculated to conceal the ravages of many 
whiskies or a large number of beers. 

I'o not hang round the theatres in the afternoon and look like an 
actor, because 

Those mountebanks who rant and gyrate for the amusement of the 
public, are very properly written down vagabonds in the fine old 
English laws. 

Do not smoke bad cigars because they are cheap, but prefer a few 

Good weeds, and if you can't afford them, I'd advise you to take a 
chew. 

Do not smile and snicker in the face of every good-looking woman 
you meet, 

Because, Telemachus, Cupid of the respectable sort is not found fool- 
ing around on the street, 

And you can take my word for it that everything in the line of a 
sidewalk mash 

Rests purely on the basis of prospective drinks and hash. 

Do not for a moment imagine that the daughters of our prominent 
citizens, unmarried, wealthy and fair 

Look among the loafers of the cigar stores for the mate whom they 
will introduce to their papa, the irascible millionaire, 

Because the probabilities are that, if they did, those papas, many of 
whom possess in a large measure the disposition of the Califor- 
nia bear, 

Would kick, with a prompt and vengeful kick, the tobacco-tainted 
masher quickly down the stair. 

(And here I might remark, Telemachus, that those gentlemen have 
their boots made just as much for kicking as for wear.) 

Be manly, truthful and honest; don't rush into the way of tempta- 
tion, 

And if you must drink, smoke and flirt, let all these be done in 
moderation. 

Don't believe that every English bank clerk you meet, with his dap- 
per little jacket and his drawl, 

Has left behind him in England a pack of hounds, a lot of devoted 
tenantry and a fine ancestral hall. 

In fine, avoid damphoolery as much as you possibly can, 

And you will get through the year thus a pretty even-going, sensible 
sort of a man. 

Editor Pixley has been sending money to Canada to purchase 
masses tor the welfare of his soul in this world, and its repose in the 
next. Under all this great man's contempt for religion, and vituper- 
ation of the Pope, lies a big streak of genuine belief in the faith of 
Rome. It would not surprise the world to learn that he was a Jesuit 
in disguise, who by a mock abuse of the faith leads the erring to in- 
trospection and repentance. 

Kate Field is telling those Eastern people that California wines 
beat the world. Good girl, Kate. They do when you get them pure, 
but that is an art we have not yet acquired. True, sweet lecturess, 
they leave the hands of the vine-grower all right. But, the dealer; 
ah, the dealer! he fixes them to suit his own fancy, and that fancy 
means adulteration with the view of increased profit. 

No more holidays now until the celebration of the birthday of the 
Father of his Country. The city will take a much needed rest, and 
the shopkeepers who have not sold out their holiday goods will stow 
them away into their cellars till next year, then to be lugged forth as 
the newest things from Paris and Vienna. 

Mr. Percy Mendoza, an accomplished confidence man, is on his 
way hither. Percy's game is the broker, and our brokers are warned 
to beware of him. There is mighty little necessity for that caution. 
In the present condition of the stock market a rat might wander all 
day through a broker's safe without stubbing his toe against a double- 
eagle. 

And still more of the gabble of pugilism. We have been mercifully 
relieved of baseball, only to tumble into this trench of inane mutter- 
ings from a pack of frothy gladiators. I hope Jackson will eat them 
all, beginning at Sullivan and ending at Kilrain, who appears to be 
the most irresponsible of the lot. 

Roger was leaning on the piano, his eyes filled with enthusiasm, 
as the fair girl trilled one of his favorite ballads. " Anything that re- 
minds you of Gray's Elegy about that," whispered George, " eh? " 
" No." " Hush! Don't you see she has waked to ecstasy the living 
lyre? " 

Mr. Mackay should be satisfied now. The employees of the Com- 
mercial Cable Company have presented him with the world. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 5, 1889. 




NOTHER veto has been added by the 
Mayor to preceding ones. He has dis- 
approved the grant of a franchise over 
Pine and Church streets, asked for by 
Congressman-elect Clunie and others. 
The Mayor could not have done otherwise, so far as Pine street is con- 
cerned. It is, in fact, passing strange that the Board of Supervisors 
did pass the order. This granted a franchise over leading streets for 
a period of fifty years, with the provision that time was not to run 
against the franchise until the streets over which it ran should all be 
graded to the official grade, and sewers constructed therein, which in 
effect meant that it was to run indefinitely. To pass such an order 
is sheer criminal negligence, if not worse, and that any set of men 
even ventures to ask such a franchise is in itself as eloquent an an- 
nouncement of how franchises are obtained as if the exact proceed- 
ure were chalked on the blackboard. There is no likelihood of this 
franchise passing, however, as the time of the present board is too 
limited. At all events a railroad is not needed on Pine street. 

Somewhat different is the proposition as to the franchise applied 
for by the Omnibus Company to the Potrero. That road is needed, 
and very much needed. The real estate interests of that section of 
the city demand it, for, nest to the outside lands north of the park, 
the Potrero is most likely to attract purchasers. The demand, even 
now, tends in that direction* and with a good cable road it is not 
unlikely that Potrero property will be even preferred to lots lying 
beyond the cemeteries. Strong efforts are accordingly made to pass 
the franchise grant over the Mayor's veto— with what success remains 
to be seen. However, it is to be remembered that the franchise 
demanded by the Omnibus Road is objectionable, not because of the 
route or routes selected, except as to a few blocks on Hyde street, 
but on account of the lack of conditions imposed on the grantees, 
and there is no question whatever that the company can get the 
franchise without trouble if it stipulates upon proper conditions. 
The prospects of the year 1889, from a real estate standpoint, are 
excellent. The old year closed upon a most active market, leaving a 
steady and large demand for all classes of property unsatisfied, and 
bestowing upon the newcomer as fair promises as ever encouraged 
the men whose business it is to talk up real estate. So far as can be 
judged from present indications, it seems certain that values will 
advance on nearly all classes of property for which there now exists 
a positive demand, and this embraces all portions of the city, except 
property south of Market, west of Third and south of Folsom streets 
and Nurth Beach property. South of Market street property has 
been singularly stationary during the new year, although quite a 
number of new business structures went up here. Just what the 
cause is it is hard to say, except that it seems as if the mercantile 
community is not so anxious to get across Market street as it has 
been. Then, again, the wholesale business world seems to be fully 
provided with accomodations just now. The only class of property 
in demand here has been warehouse sites. North Beach property, 
on the other hand, has hardly changed at all during the past five 
years. The opening of the Powell-street Cable Road had but a slight 
and temporary effect upon the market, and now seems to have left 
none. There is but little reason to suppose that the coming year 
will work any decided changes, the conditions being the same. 

In ail other parts of the city there is a prospect of a continuance 
of the rise in values as long as the demand holds out; and as to the 
latter, it is to be anticipated that it will exceed that of the past year, 
which was by no means a brilliant though a satisfactory one. Again, 
there are some possibilities that there will be more speculative buy- 
ing in 1889 than there has been. The success and number of auction 
sales would seem to indicate that, for at these, the buyers, it has been 
noticed, are beginning to buy largely upon speculation. In fact, the 
day seems to be rapidly approaching when it will be as popular to 
hold a lot of land for a rise as it was not long ago to have some 
"Crown Point" and " Mexican " salted away. The indications at 
present are that cheap lots will play a large role during 1889. 

There has, of course, been but little business done during the holi- 
day weeks. Auction sales there were none. Among the private 
sales were: 61 :8xl37:fi on the southwest corner of Front and Pacific 
streets; 25x137:6 on the north side of Post street, 87:6 east of Leaven- 
worth, $10,000; GOxdG on the southwest corner of Sacramento and 
Leavenworth streets; 137:6x137:6 on the south side of Vallejo, 137:6 
east of Kearny street, $6,000; 29:9x68:9 on the east side of Powell 
street, 68:9 feet north of Vallejo, $7,300. South of Market street the 
most recent sales were: 20x91:8 on the west side of Stewart street, 
120 feet north of Mission, $7,500, and 25x90 on the east corner of Sixth 
and Bryant streets, $12,500. 

In outside lands there have been several sales, which show that the 
interest taken in this class of property is steadily on the increase. 
There is demand for whole blocks, apparently for investment pur- 
poses, at present rates. The sales are: Block 912, bounded by N and 
O streets and Fifteenth and Sixteenth avenues; block 911, bounded 
by N. and O streets and Sixteenth and Seventeenth avenues; block 



825, bounded by L and M streets and Fortieth and Forty-first avenues, 
and block 826, bounded by L and M streets and Thirty-ninth and 
Fortieth avenues; also, 100x132:6 on the southwest corner of I street 
and Thirty-first avenue. 

In the Western Addition there were sales as follows: 60x134 on the 
southwest corner of Van Ness avenue and California street, $31,000; 
68:9x127:8 on the north side of Sacramento street, 137:6west of Lagu- 
na ; 75x137 :6 on the south side of Fulton street, 106 :3 west of Shrader ; 
137:6x137:6 on the north side of California street, 137:6 feet west of 
Spruce; 23x82:9 on the west side of Van Ness avenue, 71 feet north 
of Oak street, $12,500; and 37:6x120 on the north side of Bush street, 
100 feet west of Octavia, and 25x87:6 on the north side of Geary, 37:6 
feet west of Jones, both for $18,000. 

The market in the Mission has been showing an increase of activity 
toward the close of the year, and the new year opens with a most 
promising demand. On the whole, values show a satisfactory rise for 
1888. Among the latest sales are 122:6x155 on the southwest corner 
Eighteenth and Shotwell streets, $11,000; 50x114 on the northeast 
corner of Twenty-second and Sanchez streets; 50x114 on the north 
side of Twentieth street, 105 feet west of Guerrero street. 

The Palace Hotel is being fitted out with a complete set of incan- 
descent lights. Some nine thousand globes are required for the pur- 
pose. 

McAffee Brothers have changed the name of their firm to McAffee 
& Baldwin, the members of the firm remaining the same. These 
gentlemen, in their particular line as real-estate agents and auction- 
eers, have gained a deserved high standing in the community, and 
merit the success attending their business efforts. 

"Who is that?" " Henry Jones. Didn't you know him?" "No. He 
generally looks so thrown together iu the way of apparel. What has made 
the change?" "His tailors, of course. He patrouizes J. M. Litchfield <fc 
Co., 12 Post street, uow. Nothing slipshod about any one emerging from 
their establishment 

REMOVAL. 
THE J. DEWING COMPANY, 

Publishers, Booksellers, School Furnishers and 
Piano Manufacturers, 

Now Occupy their New Store in the 



FLOOD BUILDING, 



813 Market Street, San Francisco, 



Where they continue all their former branches of business, and add a 
retail department, embracing 

Pianos and Organs, Miscellaneous Books, fine Stationery and Imported Leather Goods 

Special Attention is Iuvited to 

THE "DEWING BROS." PIANO, 

Our Own Manufacture, and to 

"PICTURESQUE CALIFORNIA," 

Our Own Publication. [Aug. 25. 



CARRIAGES. 



We invite your attention to our recent ar- 
rivals of HIGH GRADE work, at reduced prices. 
BUSINESS BUGGIES A SPECIALTY. 

A. A. JACKSON & CO., 

33 Market Street, S. F. 

KINGSFORJrS OSWEGO STARCH ~ 

STRONGEST, 



— IS THE- 



PUREST, 

AND BEST, 

AND IS RECOMMENDED As 
THE STANDARD ALL OVER THE WORLD, 

FOR INVALIDS, 

ZKiiasra-siFOiEaiD's coiaisi staech 

la Highly Recommended for its Purity and Delicacy. 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE, 1887. 

THE GOLD MEDAL AWARDED TO THE 

NATIONAL BREWING CO., 

Was given not for export or fancy display, but for the best 

Lager Beer Brewed on this Coast. 



FIRST PRIZE AGAIN MECHANICS' FAIR, 1888. 



Pee. 15. 



HENRY C. HYDE, 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR - AT - LAW. 

MICROSCOPICAL EXAMINER 

Of Handwriting, Inks, Papers, etc., in the Detection of Forgeries, 

Counterfeits and Imitations. 

<H\'i CALIFORNIA STREET. San Francisco. 



.Tun. r,, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 



BIZ. 



¥' 



i; iiavr bad a superabundant supply of rain, and while city 
folks oomplain the farmer baa every reason to rejoice and 
be glad. Por about six weeks continuance during the 

months of November and December rain fell more or teBS 
daily, so that we enter the new year with a rain-fall of 

about eleven Inches, nearly three flmea more than at even date the 

year previous. 

Our merchant*, mechanics, artisans, fanners, fruit-growers, lum- 
bermen, ship owners and, in fact, all classes of the community upon 
the Paciflo Coast, have reason to rejoice and be thankful for a year 
Of unusual progress ami prosperity ail along the line, and now we 
have a cheering outlook for 1889, The skies are bright and present 
Indications cheery. 

The Wool clip of the State of California for 1SSS is placed at32.667,972 
lbs., which is about 1.000,000 lbs. greater than 1887, and with that excep- 
tion is the smallest total since 1872, and is 11,000,000 lbs. less than the 
banner year of 1876. The wool movement for the year ISSS is thus 
summarized by George Abbott, a pioneer dealer in the business: 

Receipts, Spring clip, l-l,si»2 t 720 lbs.; interior (East), 3,000,590 lbs.; 
Fall clip. 11,168,160 lbs.; interior (Bast), 1,336,060 lbs.; total fleece, 
i231bs.; pulled wool, 2,200.482 lba.; total product 1888, 32,668,- 
OMlhs. Stock on hand, December 31, 1888. 6,000,000 lbs.; receipts 
(Oregon), 9,676.740 lbs.; imports (foreign), 795,300 lbs.; total supply, 
1888, 19.040,044 lbs. Exports by rail, 28,404,118 lbs.; exports by sea, 
4,633,268108.; total exports, 33,097,386 lbs. Consumption and stock, 
16,942,658109.; stock on band, December 31, 1888, 2.500,000 lbs.— 13,- 
424,658 lbs. The value of the exports for the year is placed at 
$5,000,000. 

Our coal receipts and supply were greater in 1888 than ever before, 
and yet high prices were the rule — say on an average $3 per ton higher 
in 1888 than in 1887, and $0 higher than in 1886. Our total supply in 
1888, 1,282.326 tons; in 1887,1.154,993 tons; in 1886,877,239 tons; in 
1885, 911,430 tons. Considerable foreign coal has also been delivered 
direct to San Pedro and San Diego, in all in 1888, 200,703 tons; in 
1887, 188,296 tons. The highest cargo price of Australian, Wallsend or 
Gretna in 1888 was $12, the lowest, $8.90; in 1887, highest $8.75, lowest 
$6; Great Britain, highest, 1K8S, $13.50, lowest, $9.25; Great Britain, 
highest, 1887, $9, lowest, $6.37. Wellington, B. C, and coast coal 
have ruled high all through 1888 until late in December, when the 
price of Wellington was reduced $4 per ton to the trade, causing 
coast coal to follow in the wake. The strike in the Australian mines 
has of late lessened our supplies materially. 

Our Klour shipments in 1888 were 824,655 bbls., value $3,338,702; 
1887, 797,232 bbls., value $3,409,962; 1886, 1,124,615 bbls., value $4,372,- 
955; 1885, 1,295,657 bbls., value $5,337,502. During the past year the 
Canadian Pacific Railroad carried considerable Flour from Oregon 
direct to China and Japan that heretofore came here and thence 
direct to Hongkong. Oregon has therefore benefited by the cheaper 
freight to the Orient. 

Our Wheat trade for the calender year of 1888 thus compares with 
years previous: ll.7fS.436 centals, value $17,390,382; 1887, 9,065,152 
centals, value $14,683,875; 1886, 15,832,155 centals, value $21,443,167; 

1885, 11,727,895 centals, value $16,297,396. At present shipments of 
Wheat to Europe continue upon a liberal scale, while the present out- 
look for a big cereal crop in 1889 was never more cheering than at the 
present writing. 

Exports of Merchandise and Produce by sea for the year 1888 thus 
compare with preceding years: 1888, $40,699,949; 1S87, $35,720,011; 

1886, $40,201,727; 1885, $36,083,866. Shipments by rail, in value, for 
the year past, are not at our disposal, but are large, and will add 
greatly to the foregoing. 

Imports for 1888, for twelve months, ending November 30th: $48,- 
766,444: 1887, $41,606,684; 1886. $39,582,551; 1885, $34,044,447. 

The East bound overland Merchandise schedule, as furnished by 
the Southern Pacific system, for twelve months, ending November 
30th, 1888, 456,048,490 pounds; 1887,454,133,920 pounds. The service 
in 1S88 is equivalent to 228.024 tons of 2,000 lbs. each, or equal to 
22,802 cars. We have no detailed account of the West bound traffic. 

Our Quicksilver trade product has of late years fallen off materi- 
ally, owing to sharp European competition. In one sense we have 
lost our China export trade, by London underselling us. The total 
product of all California mines in 1888,32,500 flasks; while in 1880, 
59,926 flasks. Shipments for twelve months ending November 30, 
1888, 16,368 flasks, value $683,605; present price, $42 per flask. 

Whale fisheries for 1888 have been less successful than in years pre- 
ceding; the total catch of the season, 16,066 bbls. Oil, 320,247 lbs. 
Bone, and the market value thereof $889,248. This result is only 
about one-half of that of 1887 season. The total stock of Whale Oil 
in the United States is only 10,000 bbls. — a very short and diminutive 
supply. 

Wine exports by sea and land for the past four years aggregate as 
follows: 1888, 7,235,994 gallons, value $3,022,392; 1887, 6,548,610 gals., 
value, $2,740.427 ; 1886. 5,192,823 gals., value. $2,186,491 ; 1885, 4,256,221 
gals., value, $1,853,252. The vintage of 1888 is placed at 17,000,000 
gallons Wine, -and of this 4,000,000 gallons distilled into Brandy. 

Pacific Cod fisheries date from 1865, and the total catch, say for 23 
years, aggregates 23,660,300 fish. Salmon fisheries are becoming 



numerous, and extend from here to Alaska. The export trade is 
BteadUy growing and expanding. Oregon fleh are Beni largely Bast- 
ward overland, and do not come here for reshipment as in yeai 
AJaska and British Columbia fisheries supplying the vacuum, 

The Lumber receipts at this port for the years 1888 and L887 thus 
compare: Pine, fee t, 268,286,418 209.908.981; Redwood, feel 
10 L18.693.680i Bhingles, No., 146,386,000 69,680.702; R 
Ties,No.,2.306,GlG 

Tonnage suited to the drain carriage of the State is at the mi 
in short supply, and in consequence freights to Europe have of late 

materially advanced, no that the present rate to ;i direct port is £2 
and upward, and for the United Kingdom Br. Iron L6s. is asked and 
42s. 6d. ottered. _^_________ 

We notice in a New York paper that Mrs. Ella Gallagher has 
left her husband. Mr. Gallagher has been many times importuned, 
we understand, to let 'er go. —Detroit '!'< ibwie, 

"Those Oysters bt6bs good as any of the famous ones so popular in the 
East." "Of course they are." "Where did you get them?" "At Mora- 
vian's, Califnruia Market." 

H. W Patrick, teacher of the Piano, N. E. corner Taylor and Turk sts. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



Commonwealth Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— Sail Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Tuscarora Mining District, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the twenty-fourth (24th) day of November, 1888, an assessment (No. 7) of 
Fifty (50) Ceuts per share was levied upon the Capital Stock of the Corpora- 
tion, payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at 
the office of the Company, room No. 52, Nevada Block, No. 30y Montgomery 
street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

The Twenty-eighth (28th) day of December, 1888, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the twenty-first (21st) day of Jauuary, 1*89, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

HENRY DEAS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 52, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, Sau Fran- 
cisco, California. fDec. 1. 

Postponement Notice.— At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the 
Commonwealth Consolidated Mining Company, held this 21st day of De- 
cemher, 1888, the delinquent day of assessment No. 7 was postponed until 
FRIDAY, January 4, ISSj, and the day of sale until WEDNESDAY, January 
30,1889. [Dec. 29.] HENRY DEAS, Secretary. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Nevada Queen Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Tuscarora Mining District, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 21st day of December, 1£88, an assessment (No. 4) of Fifty Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coiu, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, room 52, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 28th day of January, 1889, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be 
fore, will he sold on MONDAY, the 25th day of February, 1889, to pay the 
delinquenl assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

HENRY DEAS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 52, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, Sau Francisco, 
California. [Dec. 29. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Secj. Belcher and Mides Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — Sau Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Gold Hill Mining District, Storey County, State of Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the Third day of December, 1883, an assessment (No. 2) of twenty five cents 
(25c) per share, was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the Company, room 4, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Auy stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 7th day of January, 1889, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the 28th day of January, 1889, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 

Office— room 4, Nev a Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. [Dec. 8. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company, 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California; loca- 
tion of works-Silver Star Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby giveu that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
on the 27th day of December, 1888, an assessment (No. 3) of Twenty-five 
Cents (25c) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, room 69, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, 
Sau Francisco, California. 

Auy stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 31st Day of January. 1889, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; aud uuless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold ou MONDAY, the 25th day of February, 1889, to pay 
the deliuqueut assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79 Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, Sau Fran- 
cisco, California. fDec. 29. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 5, 1889. 



BEAUTIFUL HAIR. 

To get and retain beautiful hair, you must attend to daily brush- 
ing it, occasionally washing it, and periodically trimming it, aud 
striving at all times to keep the general health up to the average. 

Now as to brushing. The skin of the head, like that of every other 
part of the body, is constantly being renewed internally, and peeling 
off in scales as fine as dust externally, and these are to be removed by 
means of the brush. But it is not so easy to brush the hair properly 
as one might imagine. Few hair-dressers, indeed, know very much 
about it. The proper time for the operation, then, is the morning, 
just after you have come out of your bath, provided you have not 
wetted the hair. Two kinds of brushes ought to be found on every 
lady's toilet-table, a hard and a soft. The former is first to be used, 
and used well, but not too roughly; it removes all dust, and acts like 
a tonic on the roots of the hair, stimulating the whole capillary sys- 
tem to healthy action. Afterward use the soft brush— this to give 
the gloss from which the morning sunshine will presently glint and 
gleam with a glory that no Macassar oil in the world could imitate. 
Whence comes this gloss? you ask. Why, from the sebaceous glands 
at the roots of the hair, nature's own patent pomade, which the soft 
brush does but spread. Secondly, one word on washing the hair. 
This is necessary occasionally to thoroughly cleanse both head and 
hair. One or two precautions must be taken, however. Never use 
soap if you can avoid it; if you do, let it be the very mildest and un- 
perfumed; avoid so-called hair-cleansing fluids, and use remi-water 
filtered. 

The yolks of two new-laid eggs are much to be preferred to soap; 
they make a beautiful lather, and when the washing is finished, and 
the hair thoroughly rinsed in the purest rain-water, you will will find 
when dry that the gloss will not be destroyed, which an alkili never 
fails to do. The first water must not be very hot, only just warm, and 
the last perfectly cold. Dry with soft towels— but do not rub till the 
skin is tender— and afterwards brush. Be very careful always to have 
your brushes and combs perfectly clean and free from grease, and 
place other brushes on the table for friends of yours who happen to 
be Macassarites. 

Pointing the hair regularly not only prevents it from splitting at 
the ends, but it renders each individual hair more healthy, less at- 
tenuated — if I may apply the term to a hair— and, moreover, keeps 
up the growing process, which otherwise might be blunted or checked. 
Singeing the tips of the hair has also a beneficial effect. 

It will be seen that I am no advocate for oils and pomades. My ad- 
vice, in all cases, is to do without them if you possibly can, for by 
their clogging nature and over-stimulating properties they often cause 
the hair to grow thin and fall off sooner than it otherwise would. 
Let well alone. 

One word, in "conclusion, about dyes. Avoid them if you be your 
own friend. Hair-dyeing is very satisfactory, as far as dead hair is 
concerned, but on the living head its perfect success is a chemical im- 
possibility. As to hair restorers, those that are not simply stainers 
depend upon the action of the light chemically altering and oxidizing 
the application after it has been used. Their incautious use is fraught 
with great danger, and trichosis furfuracea, and even worse, may be 
the result. — Harper's Bazar. 



LUCKY AT LAST. 

The Turn of the Tide in A. W. Adams' Luckless Life.— The grand 
prize in The Louisiana State Lottery, one-twentieth of which, amount- 
ing to $15,000, was won in this city, could hardly have fallen to a 
more deserving man than A. W. Adams of 915 Guerrero street. 
There is but little romance in the story of the winner's life; in fact, 
according to himself, he has never had any luck before. Working as 
a carpenter, he has earned about enough to keep himself in comfort, 
hardly ever expecting to share the luxuries so freelv distributed to 
some" Still, as be said to a reporter, ever since he was a child he has 
had a sort of vague presentiment that before he was fifty years old 
he would have a streak of luck; and now, when within a* few days of 
completing his forty-seventh year, he has suddenly sprung— thanks 
to the Louisiana State Lottery— from moderate comfort to complete 
ease. 

On Tuesday, November 15th, he had returned from his work and 
was reading the paper when bis landlady told him the " ticket man " 
was at the door. The " ticket man " was called in, and asked Mr. 
Adams to produce his tickets, which he did. There on the top lay 
No. 5R.621. When told that the ticket had drawn $15,000. the good 
man was dumbfounded for the moment, and then felta joyfulness and 
youth he had not experienced in years. To make a bee-line to the 
office where the ticket was originally bought, and seek confirmation 
of the news was the work of a few moments. There they telegraphed 
to Ni'W Orleans for confirmation of the number, and yesterday the 
money was paid over to lucky Mr. Adams. There is another lucky 
person, however, who will help invest the money, as it is whispered 
that the landlady will very soon be Mrs. A. W. Adams. 

— San Francisco, Cal. Chronicle, Nov. 24th. 

S. F. News Letter will be seutweeklyto auyaddress in the United States 
for $1.25 for 3 months, $2.50 for 6 mouths, or $5 for 12 months. The subscrip- 
tion for the Continent, Great Britaiu and the Colonies is: 3 months, $1.50: 
G mouths, $3; 12 months, $6. All subscriptions are payable in advance, and 
rhecks and P. O. O.'s should be made payable to Publisher S. F. Neus 
Lettek, Flood Building, Market street, S. F. 

If you have carpets that need to be beat, 
Send to the S. F. Carpet Beaters, 23 Tenth street. 
8. Ferguson's work is prompt and ueat. 

D. Albert Hiller.M. D. , 1011 S utter street, San Francisco, California. 



MATTHIAS GRAY CO, 

206 Post Street, 
General Agents for the Celebrated 

STEINWAY & SONS' PIANOS ! 

(the best in the world). 
Ernest Gabler Pianos, 

Kranich & Bach Pianos, 
C. Roenisch Pianos, 
Dec. 15.] C. D. Pease & Co.'s Pianos. 

FINE ART WORKS ! 

A RARE COLLECTION. 

Being a selection of about two hundred volumes from the reserved Illus 
trated Books from the great Winans Library, among which are many never 
before offered for sale. They are now on exhibition by H. H. MOORE, 423 
Kearny, near California street. 
N. B.— They will be offered a t on e-half cost of importation. {Dec. 23. 

SCHEMMEL'S MUSIC HOUSE, 

72, 74, 76 and 78 East Santa Clara Street, San Jose, Cal. 



STEINWAY & 



SONS' and 

GEORGE 

pianos 



STECK & CO.'S 



J. TOMKINSON'S LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 

Nos. 67, 59 and 61 Minna Street, 

Bet First and Second, San Francisco. One Block trom Palme Hotel. 

gJt^ Carriages and Cabs at Pacific Club, No. 130 Post street; also North- 
east Cor. Montgomery aud Bush. Carriages and Coupes sepc at stable espe- 
cially for calling. Turnouts to rent by the month. Vehicles of every 
description at reduced rates. Telephone No. 153. 



IF 



YOU WANT A 



FIRST-CLASS PIANO 

Cheap and on Installments, 
GO TO 

STATHAM <S= CO., 
1322 Market Street. 

NEW YEAR'S 

ITSEPTJIj HOLIDAT PEESEWTS! 

Initial Handkerchiefs . $1.00 a box. j White Shirts Our Own Make. 

Silk Umbrellas from $2.50 up. Latest Novelty, Haud Painted Scarfs. 

Neckwear from 25c. up. I Silk Initial Handkerchiefs $1.00. 

IRVING &. NEUSTADT, 
219 Montgomery street. - - Under Russ House. 

O. A. LUNT, 

TER PSI C H O R E A N ARTISTE, 

Academy, I3I0 Polk, near Bush Street, San Francisco. 

Classes as Follows: 

Monday . .Berkeley aud San Francisco I Thursday San Francisco 

Tuesday .Alameda Friday. Oakland and Sau Francisco 

Wednesday San Francisco | Saturday Sau Francisco 

MRS. DORA GRAY DUNCAN, 

PTANO-FORTE TEACHER, 

Is prepared to furnish Piano-iorte Music for Balls, Parties, Musicales, etc. 
Other Instrumental Music also provided if desired. 
Address— 1865 Eighth Street (Center Station), Oakland: 

Care of Bruen's Music Store. Broadway, Oakland; 

Or care of Matthias Gray Co., 206 Post btreet, S. F. [Dec. 15. 



MME. T. PHILLIPS' 

ustzew haib stoir-ie 

918 MARKET STREET, near Baldwin Theatre, SAN FRANCISCO. 

First Quality of Human Hair Goods, and Latest European Fashion in 
Hair Dressing. 

Particular attention to the Treatment of the Scalp. Also, Manicure aud 
Toilet Articles Ha ir Jewelry M a de t o Order Only. [Dec. 8- 

~ MRS. THERESA CORLETTE. 

Pupil of Garcia, and late teacher of Miss Ethel Corlette, will, by request, 
take a limited number of singing pupils. Mrs. Corlette has lately returned 
from New York, where she has heeu prepariug young ladies for the lyric 
stage. Address SHERMAN & CLAY, Kearny street. [Dec. 1. 

_ WTH OANIELL, 

Voice Development and Vocal Culture, 
524 SUTTER STREET. 

M. G. PRITCHARD, 
SPANISH TRANSLATOR, 

308 CALIFORNIA^ STREET. [Dec. 25. 



Jan. ■->, 1889 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKR. 



re 



HAVE WE A COUNTRY DIVIDED AT HEART? 
The lesson <>i the Presidential pontes! ot 18K8 is one ol deep im- 
port to the thoughtful A merican clttien. Tin' politicians throug hout 

ifrv havi ilrr:idv given their Sll portu'i ;t I virws of the rOSnil 

end the consequences that are likely to follow it, but in our analysis 
of the great Issue we arrive ai very dlffereui conclusions. What 
seems to us to be the striking feature of the late campaign is that it 
was, in substance, fought upon the same line of battle as the war of 
the great rebellion of some quarter oi a century ago, with this differ- 
ence, that ballots ami not bayonets wete the weapons in the bands of 
the contending armies. In 1888,. as doling the rebellion, it was the 
Bolid North against the Solid South, ami thetormer again triumphed. 
The issue of free trade versus protection \va> not. as the polUuians 
think, the real issue that moved the heart of the nation to its depth; 
it was only a factor In the result. What alarmed the North was that 
the free trade Issue was a Southern measure, introduced by a Demo- 
cratic Representative of Texas, and warmly supported by the 
Southern Senators in Congress. it was ingeniously, adroitly and 
Continuously asserted by the Republican politicians that the Mills 
bill was in the interests of the English free traders, and false extracts 
were published from leading London journals to confirm the asser- 
tions. It was again and again reiterated by Republican orators that 
England and the South had combined to ruin the growing manufac- 
turing interests of the North, and that the messages and policy of 
President Cleveland had the same tendency. The result of all this, 
triumphantly ejaculated the partisan stump speaker, would be the low- 
ering ot the wages of mechanics, artisans and the working classes to 
the starvation prices of Europe, as it was termed. The political false 
hood took immensely, and through its instrumentality the Solid 
North ranged in line of battle precisely as during the rebellion. Thus, 
after a quarter of a century, we are confronted with the sad and even 
startling fact that our country is at heart divided, and that the 
issues of the past and present are certain to come up in future, thus 
perpetuating sectional memories and antagonisms which every true 
American can only wish were forever extinct. The grave question 
now presents itself whether it is possible to organize a third national 
party, whose platforms and principles will be a new Declaration of 
Independence, of unity, love and brotherhood for the United States 
of America. Such a Declaration must absolutely assert, with solemn 
conviction, that it knows no Solid North nor Solid South, and that 
sectional hates and animosities, as now understood, are forever 
buried. A national party founded upon such noble grounds is 
needed. It will be the party of the future, and to it will be entrusted 
the destiny of the greatest Republic the world has ever seen. 

BISMARCK AS A DOCTOR OF DIVINITY. 
Prince Bismarck, to all his other honors, has added that of Doctor 
of Divinity. The man of iron is now a professor of that theology 
which preaches peace on earth and good will among men. It is the 
University of Giessen which has thus honored the Prince, and there- 
by excited the hilarity of all who are beyond the reach of the Chan- 
cellor's long arm. It is not well to be too hard upon the men of 
Giessen. Like the widow in scripture they gave what they could, 
and if the gift is neither ornamental nor useful, but is, on the con- 
trary, grotesquely inappropriate, the fault is not theirs. Men give 
only to the rich, and the precedent was long since established of con- 
ferring degrees of every possible kind upon great and distinguished 
persons merely because they could reflect more honor upon the 
University than it could upon them. In the case of this latest de- 
gree two questions seem to call for an answer. It is not very many 
years since this same University of Giessen was found to be engaged 
in the bad practice of selling diplomas to those who could pay cash 
down, and it would be interesting to know whether the practice has 
been discontinued long enough to restore dignity and worth to the 
University parchment. It was charged with the singular blunder of 
giving our own Tennyson Deane a diploma as a medical doctor, 
but that happily was a mistake. It proved a forgery, although it was 
a good enough one to fool the medical faculty of the University of 
California. Supposing the first question well out of the way, the 
second is: How far will religion and a sacred character attach to the 
future state papers and utterances of the Chancellor D. D. ? The mat- 
ter is by no means so trifling as it seems. Foreign statesmen and 
nations ought not to be left in the dark as to whether they unwit- 
tingly make themselves guilty of constructive blasphemy in opposing 
Bismarck's exposition of doctrine. Ex-Minister Sargeant is dead, 
but Bismarck's unfriendliness to the American hog survives. Was 
that opposition Divinely inspired ? or is it to cease now that the Chan- 
cellor is to look at things through theological spectacles. The future 
is dim, without doubt. 



If young men in this country put half as much energy into their 
daily work as they do into playing ball, the young men of this coun- 
try would be rich enough to marry before they were two years older. 
—New York News. 

Miss Westend (confidentially)— Mr. Saphead proposed to me last 
night. Rival Belle— Did he? When I refused him in the afternoon 
he said he was going to do something des perate. —Phila. Record. 

G. T. Marsh & Co.'s store, 625 Market street, is the rendezvous of con- 
noisseurs and curio hunters, including the most prominent collectors of 
Europe and America. 



PROTECTION TO ACTORS. 
Why should there not bo protection all round.' Are noi all dti- 
Nna entitled to equal rights and privileges before the law? What is 
sauce for tin ,. ..,jiy gauce for the gander. It the spinner of 

a yarn! I i n titled to protection, why should nol the Bpinner 
of wordy one- It also entitled ton': That is the question which our 
home manufactured actors want answered. They have recently pe- 
titioned Congress for protection from the ruinous competition oi the 
pauper actors of Europe. They say that they cannot successfully 
compete with foreign importations, and that, as the party which was 
successful at the late election stands pledged to extend protection to 
American labor, they insist that the foreign pauper shall no longer 
be permitted to take the bread OUl Of their mouths. In view of the 
arguments ami promises of the Late campaign, it is difficult to see how 
their olairns can logically, justly, or in good faith he resisted. It is 
not to the purpose that, as a rule, they supply an inferior article at 
an advanced price, which buyers prefer not to pay so long as they can 
get exactly what they want at a figure that suits them. No such ar- 
gument must be listened to for a single moment. It may be forcible, 
reasonable and just, but it went down before the solemn decision of 
a people whose voice is equal to the voice of God. Protection of an 
inferior article at a superior price is the determined law and policy 
of the land, and should be accorded to all alike. The action of the 
actors may, and probably will arouse "men in other professions to 
make a similar request. Why should not home-spun journalists take 
a hand in the movement? The newspaper offices of the country 
are overrun with foreign pauper writers. Right here in San Fran- 
cisco, as the News Letter pointed out at the time, the tariff editorials 
of every daily and weekly newspaper, except the Argonaut, which did 
service during the late campaign, were written by foreigners. In the 
case of the solitary exception, Brother Pixley declined to discuss the 
tariff at all, confessing he did not understand it. Why should the 
native workman have been thus crowded out by the foreign pauper? 
It is an unfair condition of things, and, now that Harrison is elected, 
must be seen to. 



MEAT VERSUS SALT. 



Science teaches us that salt meat has considerably less nutritive power 
than fresh meat. The same principle applies in a higher degree to a num- 
ber of liquid extracts of meat, or so-called beef-tea, or bouillous, which are 
beiug offered to the American public at prices entirely out of proportion 
to their real nuitritive value. Accordiug to analysis by Dr. Rudolph 
Sendtner, published by the Royal Analytical Institute of Munich, most of 
these liquid extracts contain only a very small proportion of real extract 
of meat, but an enormous quantity of talt, with the addition of some llavor- 
iug ingredients like celery, or similar stuff; and in analyzing five different 
sorts, Dr. Sendtner obtained the following results: 

No. 1 beiug considered as one unit of extract of meat. 
" 2 is equal to 1.62. 
" 3 " 2.43. 

" 4 " 2.84. 

" 5, the real Liebig Company's Extract of Meat, beiug equal to 6.20. 
And in calculating, the quantity of salt added to the different sorts: 
No. 1 contains 77.83 per cent. 
" 2 " 06.70 

" 3 " 52.68 

" 4 " E4.59 " 

No. 5 (the Company's Extract) contains no added salt at all. This proves to 
a certainty that the consumer, in using these various sorts of liquid extract 
of meat (bouillons), pays mainly for a very strong solution of common salt, 
slightly flavored with some extract of meat and some other ingredients of 
no nutritive value. Beef-tea made from Liebig Company's Extract of Meat 
is, therefore, of far greater nutritive value as a stimulant, and infinitely 
cheaper at present retail prices. Purchasers should be sure to get the 
genuine, with signature of Justus von Liebig in blue ink on the label. 




CUNNINGHAM CURTISS, & WELCH, 

WHOLESALE STATIONERS AND BOOKSELLERS, 

327, 329, 331 SANSOME STREET. 
|Teb. 19. 1 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY, 

No. SIO Sansome Street, : : San Francisco 



WHOLESALE DEALERS IN FURS. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 5, 1889. 



THE PRISONER'S FLOWERS. 

[Adapted feom Goethe.] 
" There is a flower, a pretty flower, 
I long, oh, how I long for it! 
It charms me with such gentle power 

That 1 would haste, did fate permit, 
To gather it; but cannot stir 
For I am a poor prisoner. 

" From my lone watch tower on the steep 
I look around with vacant stare, 

Gazing till I could almost weep, 

Heart-wear}' of the sun and air; 

If any bring the flower I want 

He shall become my confidant." 

" Queen of the flowers am I," replied 

A rose that heard the prisoner speak, 
" The queen of flowers, the garden's pride; 
If it be me for whom you seek 
You show an inclination, sir, 
Becoming a noble prisoner." 

" No beauty can with yours compare, 

Soft is your blush, august your mien, 
Such as a lady's in whose hair 

Diamonds as dew-drops may be seen, 
But yet. fair rose," the prisoner cried, 
" Twas not for you just now I sighed." 

Quoth then the lily of the vale, 

" Your sigh, perchance, was heaved for me; 
Behold me near, though rather pale, 

My pearls with real ones agree; 
The poets who confess my worth 
Think me the darling of the earth." 

" Your excellence I know full well 

And value," said the prisoner, 
" Your folding leaf and dewy bell 
Invite the elfin reveler; 
But lilies are too nice for me, 
For I am in captivity." 

" You are quite right," exclaimed the pink, 

"Roses and lilies to decline, 
And only of myself to think, 

Hoses and lilies who outshine ; 
By choosing me you prove your sense, 

For I'm the pink of elegance." 

" You're much too gay," the prisoner said, 
" Frequenter of the gay parterre, 
Coquetting with the sun and shade, 

Ne'er would you deign my cell to share; 
The flower selected by my heart 
Is neither pert nor half so smart." 

" The violet am I, endear'd 

To all who cherish solitude; 
Dark though my hue, my scent has cheer'd 

Some who the public ne'er have woo 'd; 
If I am not the favorite, 
Who can it be, thou captive knight?" 

11 The violet deserves its friends," 

The prisoner said, " whate'er their rank. 

Grace to the pleasure ground it lends, 
And fragrance to the mossy bank; 

But what have you, oh, violet blue, 

With a poor prisoner to do! 

" The flower I need is not possest 

Of beauty, yet it is my pet, 
Dearer by far than all tb^ rest, 

Dearer than e'en the violet; 
For 'tis the emblem of ray lot, 
That flower is the Forget-me-not." 
E'en as he spoke the prison bar 

Withdrawn displayed a tearful face, 
And one rememb'ring, though afar, 

Was clasp'd in conjugal embrace. 
Oh, ye who think yourself forgot 
Cherish the flower Forget-me-not. l. g. i 

San Francisco, January 5, 1888. 



Better 
Better 
Better 
Better 
Better 
Better 
Better 
Better 
Better 
Better 



BETTER THINGS. 

to smell the violet cool than sip the glowing wine; 

to hark a hidden brook than watch a diamond shine. 

the love of a gentle heart than beauty's favor proud ; 

the rose's living seed than roses in a "crowd. 

to love in loneliness than to bask in love all day; 

the fountain in the heart than the fountain by the way. 

be fed by a mother's hand than eat alone at will; 

to trust in God than say, '* My goods my storehouse fill." 

to be a little wise than in knowledge to abound ; 

to teach a child than toil to fill perfection's round. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

People's Home Savings Bank 
has declared its semi-annual dividend as follows, and will be paid at their 
banking offices ou Market and Fourth streets, in the Flood Building, on and 
after January 2, 1889: Ordinary Deposits, at the rate of 4.25 per cent, per 
annum ; Term Deposits, at the rate 5.10 per cent, per annum ; Stockholders, 
at the rate of 6 per cent, per anuum. On all deposits the percentage is 
furthermore apportioned from date of deposit, the deposits thus bearing 
interest for ihe entire term of deposit. 
J. K. WILSON, COLUMBUS WATERHOUSE, 

Secretary and Cashier. [Dec. 29.] President. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

North Star Mining Company. 

Dividend No. 3 (fifty cents per share) of the North Star Mining Company, 

will be payable at the office of the Company, 401 California street. San | 

Francisco, on MONDAY, December 31, 1888. Transfer books will be closed 

from December 26, 1888, to January 2, 1889. 

DAVID A. JENNINGS, Secretary. 
Note.— Dividend on stock issued In New York payable at the Transfer 
Office of the Company, 18 Wall street, New York. 
San Francisco, December 27, 1888. [Jan. 5. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, 
N. E. Corner Montgomery and Post Sts., 

San Francisco, January 2, 1889. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this 

day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of 4% per cent, per annum on 

all deposits for the six months ending December 31, 1888, free of all taxes, 

and payable from and after this date. 

Jan. 5.| ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union, 

532 California street, corner Webb. 

For the half year ending with the 31st of December, 1888, a Dividend ha 

been declared at the rate of five (5) per cent, per annum on Term Deposits 

and four and one-sixth (4 1-6) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free 

of taxes, payable on and after Wednesday, January 2, 1889. 

Dec25.J LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society, 

526 California Street. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1888, a dividend has been declared 

attherateof five and one-tenth (5 1-10) percent, per anuum on Term Deposits 

and four and one-fourth (4}4) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, 

payable on and after Wednesday, January 2, 1889. 

Dec. 29.1 GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society, 

Northwest Corner of Powell and Eddy Streets. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1888, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of five (5) per cent, per anuum on Term Deposits, and 
four (4) per cent- per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable 
on and after WEDNESDAY, January 2, 1889. 

Dec. 15.1 VERNON CAMPBELL. Secretary, 

"dividend NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society, 

619 Clay Street. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1888, a dividend has been declared, 

at the rate of four and eighty one-huudredths (4 80-100) per cent, per annum, 

on all deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Wednesday, January 2, 

1889. 

Dec. 29.1 CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



The Pacific Bank 
has declared its regular semi-annual dividend, at the rate of eight per cent, 
per annum, on the par value of the capital stock, and the same will be paid 
at its baukiug house, on the northwest corner of Pine and Sansome streets, 
Sau Francisco, on and after January 2, 1889. 
O. F. MINER, Secretary. [Dec. 29.] R. H. McDONALD, President. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Oceanic Steamship Company. 
Dividend No. 44 (one dollar per share) of the Oceanic Steamship Company 
is now payable at the office of the Company, 327 Market street. 
Jan. 5.] E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

DRESS SUITS FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS! 

j- . c o o f :e b, 

MERCHANT TAILOR- 

24 New Montgomery St., Palace Hotel Building ljune30, 

LOUIS R0EDERER CHAMPAGNE. 
Tin' Highest tirade Champagne in the World. 

CABTE BLAETCHE" 

(WHITE LABEL) ? 

A Magnificent Rich Wine. 
"a-IR-A-ZCnD "VI35T SBC," 

(BROWN LABEL) 7 

Perfection of a Dry Wine. 

See that every Bottle bears the private label of 

MACONDRAY & CO., 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast 




Jnn. 5, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKK. 



2i 



THE UBRARY TABLE. 

The Christmas number of •■ Paris niustre " i- a brilliant issue, 
oontatnlnK among i* s Illustrations ■ double page ol "Cblneee Peonies 
and French Rosea," Introducing an interior, and a lady, charmingly 
drawn, inhaling the fragrance ol the flowers. Figaro is also a One 
number. Its Illuminated title representing a troubadour with uis man- 
dolin swung over his shoulder, itnd his crayon busily sketching 
Paris, which Lies stretchedoui from his feet. Other pictures are ** The 
Riverside Inn," "Juana," and ;i scries of sia pictures travestying 
the impreaaiunial school pi painting, as represented by Turner and 
his followers. BeveraJ other large Illustrations in color, and the usu- 
al black and white, aid in making the pages interesting. The text is 
translated into English, and the papers arc issued by the successors 
of QoUpU, the International News Co. of New York being the 
American agents. 

■'A Friend to the Widow." by Maja Spencer, recently issued by 
Belford, Clarke & Co., is too fragile tor serious review, the material 
tor a frothy, three-column story being stretched out over two hun- 
dred and forty-tWO duo-deciiuo pages, making il altogether too filmy. 
It Is evidently written by a woman who knows nothing about men, 
practically, and introduces the most ridiculous conversation as being 
Indulged In by the two, who figure principally in the book. The story 
has no evident motive, and its deductions by conversation and inci- 
dent are trivial and Jlippant. The proof-reader was as desultory in 
his work as the author in hers, with the result of pages full of typo- 
graphical errors. A (low of chattering language does not make a 
story, else a parrot might be a philosopher. 

Yule Tide, the Christinas annual of Cassell's Family Magazine, is a 
beautiful work in color, the title page, wherein the name appears in 
a wreath of holly, being particularly pretty and neat. " Mrs. Tabby's 
Academy," a full-page lithograph, representing all sorts of kittens, 
ranged school-child fashion on the benches of the school room, can- 
not fail to delight the young people. There are other pictures, both 
of sentiment and humor, and a large double-sheet lithograph repre- 
sents an old mother awaiting the return of her soldier son, who is in 
the act of stealing up behind her unawares. 

Given his father's genius, Julian Hawthorne's story of " The Pro- 
fessor's Sister," published by Belford, Clarke & Co., might have de- 
veloped into a great story; but, as his father's genius failed to reach 
the son, the story is disappointing. It is a good conception spoiled 
in the telling. The characters are not rounded into life; are filmy, 
unsubstantial and unfinished. They are a student's fancies masquer- 
ading in an inartistic way in real life, and hence extremely disap- 
pointing to all but the student himself. 

The correspondent of a New York daily writes from Monte Carlo 
about the dullness of things there owing to the slow play which has 
prevailed for the last fortnight. The only plunger worth naming 
during the last week has been Grand Duke Peter, nephew of the 
Czar. This young man, by industriously betting the limit, managed 
to lose 1,000,000 francs in a very short time. Instead of being sorry, 
all the other Russians were glad, for his mother is enormously 
wealthy and notoriously a great miser. Another less distinguished 
loser was a very unprepossessing old specimen of exotic princess. 
This lady carried her belief in fetiches to an extreme degree. She 
sat at the table with a large rope, with which a murder had been 
committed, wound round her neck, and a bull's horn under each 
arm— an idea which will probably be new to American gamblers. In 
spite of the rope and bull's horns, her last penny melted away. She 
made it uncomfortable for the quiet croupiers by gathering a meeting 
in the Casino and declaring that because she had been robbed in the 
Panama Canal business it was no reason for her also being swindled 
out of her money at the roulette table; that Mr. De Lesseps would 
certainly die of it, and so should she; after which she started away 
with the bull's horns as total assets. 



Before the discussion " Is Marriage a Failure," of which all must 
have become a little weary, has become defunct, here is a passage 
from Pope which is worth transcribing for the benefit of those ladies 
who, suffering from failure, are happy and anxious to remain so, or 
only trembling upon the brink of the sea of matrimony, and willing 
to be taught how to avoid at least one quicksand. Pope wrote: 
She who ne'er answers till a husband cools, 
Or if she rules him, never shows she rules, 
Charms by acceptiug, by submitting sways, 
Yet has her humor most, when she obeys. 
At all events, here is an infallible Pope. 

For the gentlemen .who have tried it once and found it a failure, 
and are thinking of making the experiment a second time, these lines, 
translated from the Greek poet Aristophon, are worthy of their at- 
tention : 

Bad luck to him who second came to wed ! 
The first I blame not ; home a wife he led. 
But knowing what a curse a wife might prove, 
What deadly feuds may spring from miscalled love, 
Thus be who married next, iu haste unwise, 
Rushed to his fate with fully opened eyes. 

The Gladstone, Helena and Giant mine, located at French Gulch, 
Shasta County, are now being systemmatically opened up by a syn- 
dicate of capitalists in this city. A 12-stamp mill, erected on the 
Gladstone property, will start up with water power next week. The 
ores from the present working run from $27 to $30 per ton. 



A friend ot ours Imported a costly cook from the city to cook bis 
Kmas dinner in the country. She had lived In the besl Families, was 
renowned for her sauces, and bad earned the cordon Msu for her soups, 
ll«- bade his friends join him at the feast, and, surrounded by the 
associates ol his VOUth, Sai expectantly in the parlor, awaiting the 
summons to the superb feast, A message came from the kitchen. 

The rook wauled more brandy for the pudding sauce. She got it. 

Five minutes afterward^ another message for more brandy, it was 

furnished. Then, tired Of the delay, the genial and hungry DO 
enseil himself for a moment ; he wished to step into the kitchen, jllsl 
to s,-e how things were going on. lie opened the door of t lut 
apartment with a smile upon his face. He Stepped across the thresh- 
old, ami was at once S&luted with a swinging blow from the turkey 
across the nose. His yell of pain —for the turkey was red-hot — brought 
the guests to the scene. The foremost was just tn tunc to get pasted 

in the eye with the padding. And then the cook, with a ahriefa of 
demoniacal laughter, fled to the Woods, and cooled her brOWS under 
the dripping foliage until Ear into the morning, when a search party 
was organized, which finally captured her. The turkey was all right, 
but the disintegration of the pudding was irretrievable. 

Good, news comes from the northwest— a comparatively new coun- 
try of unlimited possibilities. Mines are constantly being discovered 
immediately beyond the confines of the United States, but it speaks 
little for the enterprise of the British residents that these sources of 
immense wealth are absolutely in the hands of the hardy miners 
and prospectors of Butte and Montana, backed by the capital of 
Michigan, Minnesota and New York. 



PERIR-JOUEUCie, 



<DTHA3&JE , A.C3tlSn£. 



We have just received direct from France, per steamer via New Orleans, 
our first shipment of this justly celebrated Wine, which we now offer for 
sale to the Trade at the lowest market rates. 

RESERVE CUVEE, 



Finest Extra Quality, 

Extra Dry, 
Pale Dry, 



PINTS AND QUARTS. 



do 



do 



July 21.1 



BLUM, BALDWIN & GIRVIN, 

Importers, 

307 California Street, S. 



H. B Williams. 



A. Chesebrough. 



W. H. Dimomd 



WILLIAMS, DIMOND & GO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
UNION BUILDING, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 



Agents forPacificMailSteamshipCompany, Pacific Steam Navigation Com- 
pany, The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship Company, "The California Line of 
Clippers," from New York and Boston, and "The Hawaiian Line." 

J. D. Spreckels & Bros., 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Agents for Spreckels' Line of Hawaiian Packets, S. 8. Hepworth's Centri 
fugal Machines, Reed's Patent Pipe and Boiler Covering. 
327 Market Street, corner Fremont, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



B. L. JONEB. 



S. L. JONES & CO., 



E. D. Jones. 



Auctioneers and Commission Merchants, 

207 and 209 California Street. 

~~~josFph GILLOTT'S steel pens. 

Gold Medal, Paris. 1878. 

*3»-These Pens are " the best in the world." Sole Agent for the United 

States, MR. HY. HOE, 91 John St., N. Y. Sold by all Statio ners. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Con. California and Virginia Mining Company. 

San Franxisco, Januarys, 1889. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the above-named Company, 
held this day, dividend No. 24, of Fiftv Cents (50c.) per share was declared, 
payable on THUK8DAY, January 10, 188rf. 
p 3 A. W. HAVENS, Secretary. 

Office— "Room 23, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomefy street, San Francisco 
California. I Jan- 6- 

DR. RICORD'S RESTORATIVE PILLS. 

Buy none but the Genuine— A Specific for Exhausted Vitality. Physical 
Debility. Wasted Forces, etc.— Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the Medical Celebrities. Agents lor California and the Pacific States. 
J G STEELE & CO., 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. Sent 
by mail or express anywhere. PK1CES REDUCED. Box of 50 pills, ?1 25; 
of 100 pills, £2; of 200 pills, *3 50; of 400 pills, $6; Preparatory Pills, *2. 

Send for Circular. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 5, 1889. 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. 

Wiesbaden, Germany, 1888. 
EAR KATE: — After our trip around the lake of Lucerne, we 
hastened to Zurich, the intellectual center of Switzerland, 
with its reminiscences of Lavater and Pestalozzi, its tine pub- 
lic and private schools, its magnificent university that ac- 
commodates a thousand students, of both sexes, and all 
nationalities; in fact, nowhere, uur cultured Boston not excepted, 
have scientific interests so permeated all classes and become so much 
a matter of public pride and tradition as in this Swiss city of only 
ninety thousand inhabitants, where families from all parts of Europe, 
and not a few Americans, make temporary homes, for the sake of 
affording their children the educational benefits which rank second 
to none on this continent. An hour's railroad travel took us from 
Zurich to Romanshorn, the principal port on the Swiss side of Lake 
Constance, which we crossed by moonlight that formed a glittering 
column on the black waters, idealized the pretty banks of the lake 
and brought out finely the contours of the lighthouse and the huge 
granite lion that guard the entrance to the German port Lindau, 
where trunks had to be opened and ransacked, and we came near 
shedding tears on seeing our pretty Parisian dresses pulled about by 
the clumsy hands of Bavarian custom-house inspectors. The true 
comfort of traveling consists in the complete absence of luggage, and 
we are gradually learning to leave our boxes on the road, until 
ready to pick them up on our return trip. 

Our next destination, Wiesbaden, one of the fashionable German 
watering places, was reached in the early morning hours, and since 
several weeks we are installed here. The town being situated in a 
hollow, protected from the winds, and its temperature raised several 
degrees by the many springs which bubble from the ground so hot 
that the water has to be cooled before it is fit for drinking or bathing 
purposes, the "cure" is continued during the winter months. As 
early as seven o'clock a. m. the patients, principally victims to gout 
and rheumatism, begin their weary walk, unless they are so ill as to 
require being pushed along in an invalid's chair, to the " Trinkballe '* 
to imbibe of the water and take the prescribed exercise, to the sound 
of music by the brass band, under the vine-covered arbors on Taunus 
street. The scene would be rather doleful if it were not for the 
presence of the many young people, who come out early because it is 
the fashion to do so. Among the bright English girls who take their 
daily morning stroll, carrying long canes or the fashionable direc- 
toire umbrella that answers the double purpose of support and pro- 
tection, are the daughters of Princess Christian of Schleswig Holstein, 
who is being treated here by the famous oculist, Dr. Pagenstecher. 
The two young princesses are rather pretty blondes, and, though the 
grand daughters of the most gracious Queen Victoria, are distin- 
guished by their very simple attire, consisting of tailor-made gowns 
of black or gray cloth, with felt hats to match. The family nightly 
occupy the royal box at the theatre, and are reverentially stared at 
wherever they show themselves, and once, when attending a concert 
at the " Kursaal," they occupied seats in the front row, some foreign- 
ers unwittingly took possession of the chairs next to theirs, but were 
immediately invited by one of the ushers to vacate them, for the Ger- 
man mind can not grasp the idea that a simple human being should 
dare to brush against the august presence of a princess. To me and 
most Americans this title worship seems ludicrous, but a German 
without some sort of title is a nonentity. The bows and scrapes 
and respectful consideration belong to the " high-born " and to the 
Americans, whose supposed wealth secures for them high respect 
and highest bills from all European tradespeople. 

Wiesbaden has lost much of its prestige since, in 1873, it passed 
under Prussian rule, and its gambling saloons were closed; it does 
not now attract the gay crowds of Russians, Spaniards and Italians 
of former years; as to the French, they, of course, shun German 
watering places. So this one is given up to the sober Teutons, who 
are satisfied with the mild dissipations of concerts and theatre, that 
begin at six and end at nine o'clock p. m. After ten the cafes are all 
closed, darkness reigns supreme, and carriages can then only be had 
by special order. For those who come here to regain lost health, the 
monotonous routine of the place prescribes, alter the roatitudinal 
drink at the hot spring, a simple breakfast of coffee and rolls without 
butter ; at ten o'clock comes the bath, which is now furnished at every 
first-class hotel in its regular bath-house, with its stone tanks, in 
which the patient passes a solitary half hour, immerged to the chin 
in the hot salt water, or, if he prefers, the health-giving fluid is car- 
ried to his room, and served in a long tin tub. in either case follows 
an hour's rest in bed, then comes a short promenade and drinking 
of the mineral water again. One o'clock finds the hotel guests as- 
sembled for table d'hote dinner, where you are expected, before taking 
your seat, to exchange with your neighbor and vis-a-vis silent bows, 
where the " cure" and the different ailments of each individual fur- 
nish the staple articles of conversation during the meal, where the 
■menu is written in German, because Kaiser Wilhelm has decreed that 
French henceforth is to be a dead language, and where the men 
smoke, regardless of the presence of ladies. After dinner, walking 
is again in order, and the pretty woods around Wiesbaden offer fine 
inducements to pedestrians, even at this season, when the rustling, 
yellow leaves cover the shady paths that lead to the neighboring 
villages, to the beautiful Greek chapel, built as a mausoleum for the 
Duchess of Nassau, or to the Neroberg, a hillock covered with fine 



vineyards, which yield a highly prized wine. The other day we were 
attracted to a vintage scene by the merry songs of the peasant women 
who were busy picking the ripe grapes, but, when told that the poor 
creatures were commanded to sing to prevent themfiom eating of the 
berries, the bright picture lost much of its brilliancy in our eyes. 

Besides the walks and drives, which are pleasant in summer but 
rather cold at this season, you have, during the afternoon and even- 
ing, the resource of the " Kursaal." Every visitor, upon arrival, 
provides himself with a card of admittance, which, for the modest 
sum of eighty-five cents per week, entitles him to enjoy the daily 
concerts, that occasionally include performances by celebrated art- 
ists, such as Frau Sembrich, the Berlin prima donna; Sarazate, the 
violinist, or Mierzwinski, the Polish tenor. Theodore Wachtel, the 
once famous singer, whom I remember in the long, long ago at San 
Francisco, when his countrymen gave him an ovation at the packed 
opera-house, is here since several weeks. He has grown fat and dyes 
his hair jet black, but he sings no more. He has been prudent enough 
to accumulate a handsome fortune, and lives as a gentleman of means 
and leisure with his family, consisting of a good-natured looking 
German " hausfrau," two fair daughters — the elder of whom shows 
some musical disposition, if I am to judge by her daily practicing of 
scales — and an ugly little poodle of vicious propensities. 

The drawing-rooms at the Kursaal are remnants of former great- 
ness, the once splendid hangings faded ; the furniture, stiff and vener- 
able with age, stands in rigid precision around the vast room. Once, 
when wanting to join a group of friends in conversation, I had the 
audacity to move a chair, but was peremptorily ordered by the at- 
tendant to desist, and understood the wisdom of the command when 
two of the casters rolled from under the rickety piece of furniture 
that bad long ceased to be a thing of use, except as a decoration. 
The reading rooms consist of four large salons, from the walls of 
which the word " Silence " in large letters stares at you everywhere. 
The first room, devoted to heavy German literature, is humorously 
called " Hell " — probably because in it reigns the hopeless stillness of 
the damned; the next contains all sorts of lighter periodicals; yet, 
if you venture to whisper, a severe "hist!" calls you to order. In 
the room following this are the French, Spanish, Italian, Russian, 
Scandinavian, etc., publications. The strict rule of silence is occa- 
sionally relaxed, but still more so in the next salon, where English 
and American publications attract their respective admirers, where 
the young people like to come, and where mild flirtations are not 
unusual occurrences; yes, where I saw one of my countrywomen carry 
on an animated correspondence with a dark-eyed handsome foreign- 
er, by means of short sentences, furtively scribbled on the papers 
that were politely passed between them. I confess to having watched 
the two from behind the large sheet of the London Times. After both 
had gone I maliciously took up the Standard, which the little woman 

had put down, and there I saw written in plain English No, 1 

shall not be indiscreet, and will only tell you that next day, when I 
made it my business to be at the suggested place, I met the two in 
close and evidently pleasant conversation. After that I saw them 
together at the weekly hops, the cafis, the promenades. The reading- 
room, however, saw them no more. Hirondelle. 

W. & J. Sloane & Co., the well-kuowu furniture aud carpet dealers of 
641-647 Market street, have issued a neat calendar, with a snowed iu traiu, 
a New England Spring hillsides, a Summer scene, and so forth, as illustra- 
tions. 

NO POISON, 

No germs, no fungi and no impurity of any kind is ever found in any of 
the wines and brandy put up aud sold by the 

PURITY WINE CO. OF CALIFORNIA. 

Absolute purity, richness and delicacy characterize their goods. Their 
wines are as much better than some of the new aud impure stuff sold as 
California wine as refined sugar is better than the raw. Nobody will ever 
use the impure, when the pure cau be obtaiued. 
Nov. 24. j Office, No. 303 Battery Street S. F. 

"P OR Social Gathering s, whether 

Public or Private, there can he 

no more Elegant a Wine used than 



FINE TABLE @o* 
WINES ^ 



FROM OUR 



CELEBRATED ORLEANS 
VINEYARD. 





Eclipse 

Champagne 

530 Washington & 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Eclipse Champagne 

Its Delightful Taste, Delicate V\: i 
vor and Absolute Purity should he 
sufficient recommendation to all true 
lovers of Good Wine. But its crown- 
ing quality is, that, unlike Impirte-I 
Champagnes, it has n either Brandy 
nor Alcohol added to it, an d therefore 
even its freest use never leaves one , 
with a headache. 



Jan. :>, 1880. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



HORSEMANSHIP IN NEW YORK. 

What the Academies Have to Do with It. 

<r K you an wandering along the lirat block ol the Now York boule- 

i yard of an afternoon, your aUantloo will ba arreated by the 
(1 sound* of mualo straggling to make itself heard through brick 
X walla ami doable plate-glass windows, it comes trom one "f the 
leading riding academies ol which there are inch a number now 
flourishing In New York, li is a Long, low building ol yellow brick, 
end in Iron! <>f it stands a massive drinking fountain! upon which, in 
■ precarious attitude, :i horse caracoles gaily. At night the facade is 
a blase »>f electric lights, in the (ticker ol which the Bbadows of the 
Hying Hags used themselves. This academy takes rank in aeclasive- 
nees after the Biding Olub, which is a conservative association as 
diffloull "f admission as the Calumet Club, and belonging entirely to 
the ultra four hundred of -McAllister fame. This riding club is most 
sumptuous m its appointments, and has superb stables, an unexcep- 
tionable ring, luxurious dressing roomsand liveried attendants— men 
and women. It has, too, a little cafe, where exhausted riders can re- 
cuperate their strength. In the stables, the Jays, the Belmonts, the 
Nclims, the Taylors, and others of the noblesse keep their horses. 
The greutest charm of all is the purity of the atmosphere, the deli- 
ctus sense that you are not aerially contaminated by the breath of 
any one who could not, if he liked, have a card to the Patriarchs 
Hails. Hut the up-town school ranks first beyond the Four Hundred. 
It begins, one might say, with New York's four hundred and first, 
and I doubt the possibility of seeing anywhere a more refined looking 
lot of men and women than Ihirland's exhibits. That is, taken as a 
whole. There are exceptions. 

When I went in the other day, for example, a woman who, believe 
me. was the size of the renowned Big Bertha, was rioting Heshily all 
over the back of a suffering animal which seemed positively to gnash 
its teeth. She was beatific. There was no suggestion in her smile of 
dissatisfaction. No; she doubtless being used to herself thought she 
looked well. There were also some young gentlemen with apprehen- 
sive eyes and loose hands held high above the horses' necks in a way 
which, however pleasing to themselves, must have been distracting 
to the afflicted animals, and there were some others on the tan bark 
ring whose reflection in the mirror at the end of the building showed 
that they were what one might call " real nice " horsemen, who had 
never diverged a hair from the instructions the riding master had 
given, and whose whole experience had been in the afternoon or un- 
der the electric light in that same tan bark ring since equestrianism 
had possessed charms for them. It is on Wednesday and Saturday 
nights the academy is gayest. Troops of pretty girls, bright-eyed, 
red-cheeked, glowing with exercise, and more than attractive in their 
smart habits, and very wholesome-looking youths dash about the 
ring in unmitigated enjoyment, while the brass band now and then 
interrupts their bright lauguter and chattering, and excites the horses, 
even the " hackiest" of them, to something very coquettish in the 
way of prancing and dancing and indulging in all sorts of head and 
eye and ear affectation. And now and then there is a steeple chase, 
out of which the riders do not always come safely, one of the pupils 
having had recently a bad fall, which resulted in a compound com- 
minuted fracture of the right arm. And all that disaster to have taken 
place under a roof! 

Across the street a Frenchman instructs in haute icole. His estab- 
lishment is smaller than Durlands, which occupies an entire block. 
It is decorated with scene painting. Its patrons ride in the"strictest 
styles of the French school, and some of them ride very well, 
too. It is here Miss Estelle Hastings, the remarkable young lady 
from the West, who shoots, fishes walks, drives, rides, and no doubt 
can wield a tomahawk or confuse a mining expert, keeps the beauti- 
ful animal on which she is daily seen in Central Park. 

The leafless branches just now shelter a great many riding parties 
in that lovely spot, whose Autumn foliage has scarcely abandoned it. 
The weather is bright and cold and bracing— just the sort for a dash 
across the country, in fact— but this is very different trom a ride 
across the country. It is usually a mild and gentle exercise under 
the supervision of a riding master, whose sometimes sharp and some- 
times monotonous tones often reach one*s ear as he reminds some 
novice that she is not doing the correct thing in trotting. You hear 
(loudly), "One— um— um — Rise— pause — Rise — pause," and so on un- 
til the struggling horse woman has gained some idea of what sort of 
relation she and the horse should bear to each other. And when they 
are tired they all go back to the academy, and the band plays, and 
it is just like a really, truly nice little circus. 

And what a difference to a wild dash through the fresh air, over 
flat pastures, low meadows, with a stiff fence now and then, and a 
bright bit of running water to spurn as you cross it, and grassy slopes 
to breast beyond U! A roof! and tan bark! Alack! alack! I do 
not believe there is one Californian who brings honor to the West by 
any sort of riding in New York. There are numbers of them who 
drive. George McAneny, for example, has fine stables. The Mills 
and Reeds and Alexanders, when they are here, all appear in the 
Park of an afternoon, or bowl along the Riverside drive, with the 
fresh breeze from the Hudson blowingin their faces. TheSeldens, too, 
and Gibsons, are often seen there, and Mrs. Pratt, formerly Mrs. 
Hay, in a pretty Victoria, and once in a while Jo. Rosenberg, Alfred 
Seligman, Jack Wattles or Congressman Felton in huge, fur-lined 
coats will dash by at a Californian pace through the winding ways of 



Central Park. Walking is very mucb the thing now, too, and the 
Park a favorite place for a constitutional. Bui it ha-- not the beach 
and the Pacific Ocean and the seals, and that ramshackle old Cliff 
house at the end "i it. nor the very ugly man with his trained birds, 
nor the old woman and her shells, nor the popcorn vendor; there- 
tore will it always lack something of the beautiful and something 
of the familiar, if unbeautiful, to transplanted Califnrnians. Am;. 

Abu, York, Dec* mber 19, L888. 

" Hello, John ! Howareyoul Sick." "Well, yon loos it. How did 

il happen? " " Well, I ntu ton many ntkrs ami things nil New Years, I 8Up 

pose. "Home made? Yes." "Wife a k<">.i eookl Kol vers 

u Well, why didn'l you do as I did— get all these things trom Lbs Original 
Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street, when the; would have been digestible as 
well as palatable? " "Good idea. I'll do it next time." 



Electric Improvement Co. 

ELECTRIC STREET RAILWAYS, 

AMERICAN SYSTEM OF ELECTRIC ARC LIGHTING, 

STANDARD UNDERGROUND CO.'S LEAD-COVERED CABLES, 

MATHER SYSTEM OF INCANDESCENT LIGHTING, 

ELECTRIC LIGHT WIRES, LAMPS, ETC. 

Estimates furnished for Electric Railways, Electric Light and Steam 
Plauts. 

OFFICE, 217 SANSOME STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



PACIFIC COLD STORAGE AND ICE COMPANY, 

OFFICE: 212 Davis St., room 2, San Francisco. 
WAREHOUSES: Eighth and Brannan Streets. 

LIBERAL ADVANCES MADE ON GOODS IN STORAGE. 



All kinds of perishable goods taken on storage. For rates and other in- 
formation apply at the office of the Companj'. The Warehouses are under 
the management of a skilled Superintendent, who has for many years been 
connected with one of the largest cold storage warehouses in New York 

J2^~The public are invited to inspect this establishment. [Sept. 15. 

PARKE & LACY, 

21 and 23 FREMONT STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MINING, WOOD AND IKON WORKING MACHINERY. 

HNGINES, BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS, 
BELTING, OILS AND SUPPLIES. 

GEORGE GOODMAN, 

Patentee and Manufacturer of 

ARTIFICIAL STONE, 

IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 
Schillinger's Patent for Sidewalks and Garden Walks a Specialty. 
June 9-1 Office, 307 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block, S. F, 



A. LUSK & CO., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

packers of the following celebrated brands: 
A. LUSK BEAR BRAND, 

J. LUSK CANNING COMPANY, 

SAN LORENZO BACKING CO. 

H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

Nos. 309 and 311 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California, 
Sole Agents Purimachos Fire-proof Cement, "indestruct- 
ible and infallible." 
Sole Agents for " Bull Dog " brand of Bass' Ale and Guinness' 
STOUT-Bottled by Robert Porter & Co. 

Sole'Agents Johnson's Elephant brand English Portland 
Cement. 

general agents-national assurance co. op ireland ; 
atlas assurance co. op london ; 
boylston insurance co. of boston. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 5, 18S9. 



COURTED IN DREAMS. 
" A suspicious silence," the father said, 
Peering over the balusters down below, 
Where his daughter and somebody sat alone, 
In dreamy silence, with light turned low. 
" What can they be doing, wife?" he said— 

"Not a word or a sound can reach my ear; 
This courting a tax to my patience is, 
Since gas bills are high and fuel dear. 

" I wonder if all is settled at last? 

To see I will venture down the stair." 
At the parlor door he paused — Ah, me! 
Fast asleep both sat in the easy chair. 
San Francisco, January 5, 1889- Callie L. Bonnev. 



WHAT RICH MEN HAVE DONE FOR EDUCATION. 

It may interest some to know what a few rich men have done for 
the cause of education. Senator Leland Stanford has given a vast 
estate, amounting to $20,000,000, to found a university in California, 
in memory of his deceased son. Johns Hopkins gave $3,148,000 to 
the university which bears his name. His gifts for benevolent pur- 
poses amounted to $8,000,000. Asa Packer gave $3,000,000 to Lehigh 
University. Cornelius Vanderbilt gave $1,000,000, to the Vander- 
bilt University, to which William H. Vanderbilt afterwards added 
$500 000. Stephen Girard gave $8,000,000 to Girard College. John C. 
" Green and his residuary legatees gave $1,500,000 to Princeton College. 
Ezra Cornell gave $1,00U,000 to Cornell University. Isaac Rich be- 
queathed the greater part of his estate, which was appraised at 
$1,700,000, to Boston University. On account of the great fire and 
shrinkage in value, and other unfortunate circumstances, the uni- 
versity will realize less than $700,000 from this magnificent bequest. 
Amasa Stone gave $000,000 to Adelbert College by direct gift and by 
bequest. W. W. Corcoran gave $170,000 to Columbia University, in 
money and land. Benjamin Bussey gave real estate worth $500,000 
to Harvard University. Samuel Williston, William J. Walker and 
Samuel A. Hitchcock gave between $100,000 and $200,000 each 
to Amherst College. Whitmer Phoenix gave the bulk of his property, 
amounting to about $040,000, to Columbia College. J. B. Trevor 
gave $179,01)0 to Rochester Theological Seminary. Matthew Vassar 
gave $800,000 to Vassar College. Gardner Colby gave $170,000 to 
Colby University, and $100,000 to Newton Theological Seminary. 
J. B. Colgate gave $300,000 to Madison University. George I. Seney 
gave $450.0iXJ to Wesleyan University. The Crozer family gave 
$300,000 to Crozer Theological Seminary. A Mr. Clark recently gave 
$L, iiihi, 000 for the founding of a university in Massachusetts, to bear 
his name, Henry Winkley, of Philadelphia, has just bequeathed 
5200,000 to several institutions; Williams getting $50,000, Amherst 
$30,ono, Dartmouth $20,000, and Bowdoin $20,000. It would be easy 
to add to this list. There are hundreds of men and women whose 
splendid gifts entitle them to be held in everlasting remembrance. 
Such gifts are so common now that they are expected. If a rich man 
should live and die without doing something for the cause of educa- 
tion, he would at once become the subject of severe criticism. 

— American Queen. 

The women of Boston achieved a triumph at the recent municipal 
election in registering and voting in sufficient numbers to defeat the 
designs of the Catholic priesthood in the attack on the public-school 
system, and the rescue of the school committee from Irish Catholi 
politico-religious influence. So far, well and good. But wait till 
next year. If we are not mistaken, the result will be dire in the 
extreme. If the female descendants of the Puritans can register and 
vote, so can the female descendants of Catholics. It is easy to fore- 
see the result. The contest is awakened, and the result must be 
deplorable. Next year the respectable women of Boston will be con- 
fronted by a horde of women on the other side of the question, and 
then what a chaos there will be! Itwilfbe a repetition of the South- 
ern business. Charles Sumner did not wish the negro to be enfran- 
chised in the reconstruction of the South; but he was overruled. It 
is to-day a question of shotgun rule or ignorant negro domination. 
People should not be allowed to vote until Lhey are fit, whether black 
or white, Catholic or Protestant, man or woman. We are making 
voters too fast. Let intelligence take the front rank, and keep the 
ignorant mob in the background. We have too many illiterate voters 
already, and their further increase endangers the republican idea. 
Call a halt. 

A New Cement.— A lecture was delivered before the Saw Francisco 
Academy of Sciences, recently, by F. Gutzkow, on " Magnesium 
' >xy chloride, or Sorel's White Cement." He said that California was 
the most favorable country in which it could be manufactured, owing 
to tin' tact that the ingredients are found in large quantities in the 
Coast Uange. The cement is stronger, harder and whiter than the 
Portland Cement or Plaster of Paris, but its adaptability has not yet 
been te-ted. The speaker said that it was especially adapted for 
works of art and the inside finuh of houses, as it was glossy and 
strung. Its cost was much less than Portland cement. It is com- 
poscd one-half of magnesium oxyde, which is obtained from the 
magnesium deposits in the Coast Range, and one-half of magnesium 
chloride, obtained from the mother liquor of the sea salt works. 



MADAME HADINGS BEAUTIFUL EYES. 
There is an odd little story an en t the beautiful Madame Hading 
drifting about New York. Her eyes are very remarkable; not only 
of the clearest and purest brown, likethatof mountain brooks, or the 
eyes of Gwendolin— which George Eliot described as resembling 
" wave-washed onyx " — but they are veiled with a thick fringe of 
black and silky lashes and are most unusually, extraordinarily long. 
It is the most noticeable thing in her face, and when she turns her 
eyes upon a man he begins at once to recall all he has ever read con- 
cerning the eyes of Odalisques and long-eyed Circassians whom the 
Oriental poets are never done with praising. The story is that Mme. 
Hading owes this marvelous length of eye to artificial means used by 
her parents in her childhood. It is said that it is a common practice 
among the Turks, who hold long eyes in such exalted esteem, to 
lengthen, by cutting the corners, the eyes of girls who are being 
raised for the harem. This is done very early, at the age of two or 
three years, and the outer corner is deftly slit with a lancet, about 
the twelfth part of an inch. While the wound is healing the lids are 
drawn outwards every day, and when it is quite cured the eye is still 
submitted to this drawing process every day for a long time, with the 
eventual result that it becomes ideally long and narrow, and fulfils 
the ideal of the " unspeakable Turk " when he is in search of a new 
favorite. It is said that the Laura Schirmer, who was recently re- 
ported to have peen poisoned in the palace of the Sultan, first 
obtained his favor through the unusual length and beauty of her 
eyes. The story of Mme. Hading goes on to say that her father had 
been in Turkey and had seen this practice, and determined to try it 
on his little girl, who was then a pretty baby of three years, with 
bright brown eyes and a mop of yellow curls, and already taking 
part in pieces requiring babies. Whether the story is true or not, one 
thing is certain, which is that the actress from the Gymnase has the 
most beautiful and remarkable eyes of any woman on the stage. 

SOUVENIR OF SAN FRANCISCO ! 

— .Ansr ^libttim: — 

IF I -E> T "2"- T W O ABTOTYPES 

OF 

"Artistic Homes of California." 

FAR SUPERIOR TO PHOTOGRAPHS. 



The Artotypes and descriptions are printed on heavy plate 
paper, making the work suitable for Library or Parlor Table 
This is the Most Elegant Souvenir ever produced on the Pacific 
Coast ; gives the most pleasing and accurate idea of San 
Francisco, and can always be referred to with interest and 
pleasure. 

FOR SALE AT OFFICE OF 

S ]B\ nsriEWS LETTER, 

FLOOD BUILDING, 

Fourth and Market Streets, S. F. 

SE15TI3 IT TO YOtTE FEIEUES. 



Price— Bound in Card, $1.50; Cloth, $2.50; Half Morocco, $3.50. 
By Mail, 25 cents extra. 

THE GOLDEN GATE SPECIAL 



O^ 2:CO 



P. M. 



Commencinff December 8, 1888 

( WILL LEAVE 

2:00 P. M. ^S A N FkANCISC 
I Every Saturday 

CONNECTING AT 

coxrirsrciij bx.xtf'fs .a.:lnj~:d Chicago 

WITH 

Special Trains for all Eastern Cities. 
SOLID VESTIBULE TRAINS, 

COMPRISING 

Pullman Drawing-room Sleepers, 

Dining Car, Smoker, 

Bath, and Barber-Shop. 

SLEEPING-CAR RESERVATION CAN BE SECURED IN ADVANCE 

113 XAKKET' STREET, [613 

( San Francisco. ' 

[Dec. l.J 



Jan. ■"', 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trmnt Leave and are Due to A.rriva at 
SAN FRANCISCO: 

leavb | From December 8, 1888. ! arrive 



7:30 a. 
7:30 a. 
8:00 a. 
9:00 a. 

8:30 a. 

9.00 a. 
10:30 a. 

•12-00 M. 
•1:00 P. 

W.OOp. 

3:00 p. 
3:00 P. 

4:00 p. 



•■4:30 p. 
5:30 P, 



* F«»r Wayward*, NUea hi ,<\ B&nl 

, Joae .. ... | 

j For Sacramento, aud lor Ked-f 

| dlug via Davis i 

vF.ir Miirtiiu/., Vallejo, CallBto I 

I j»*a ami Santa Kosa . \ 

i For Nik->. San Jose. Stockton,) 

] Gait, lone, Sacramento,/ 

t UarysTtlle and Ked Bluff > 

■ i ;eles Express, for Frea-) 

-. DO, Bauta Barbara and Los> 

( Angeles.. * 

Fasl Mail for Ogdeu and Bast 

For Haywards and Miles 

For Hay wards and Niles 

Sacramento River Steamers .. 

(Golden Gate Special, for| 

) Couucil Bluu"» and Ea*t i 

jFor Hay wards, Niles and San) 

i Jose. i 

j Central Atlantic Express, fori 
I Ogdeu aud East. ( 

i For Stockton and ^Milton; fori 
< Vallejo, Callstoga and San-) 

' ta Kosa > 

\ For Sacramento aud forj 
( Knight's Landing via Davis.) 
|For Niles, Sau Jose and Liv-j 

) ermore ) 

Fur Haywards and Niles 
( Shasta Route Express, fori 
J Sacrameuto, Marysville, l 
Redding, Portland, Puget [ 
I Sound and East 
f Sunset Route, Atlantic Ex- 
j press, forSanta Barbara, Los 
] Angeles, Deming, El Paso, 
{ New Orleans aud East 



•12:46 P. 
7:15 P. 
6:15 P. 

5:45 p. 

11:15 a. 

11:45 a. 
2:15 p. 
•3:45 p. 

•*6:00a. 

H9:45 p. 
9:45 a. 

8:15 A. 
10:15 a. 



•8:45 a. 
7:45 a 



South Pacific Coast Railway Division. 



t3:00A. For Newark and San Jose 

(For Newark, Centerville, Sani 
8:15a. j < Jose, Feltou, Boulder CreekJ 

I ( and Sauta Cruz . . . ) 

(For Centerville, San Jose, Fel-i 
< ton, Boulder Creek and> 

C Sauta Cruz J 

(For Centerville, San Jose, Al-j 
{ madeuand Los Gat03 i 



•2:15 p. 



4:15 P, 



17:20 p. 



Northern Division (Fourth and Townsend Sts). 



8:S0a. 



10:30 a. 
12:01 p. 



•3:30 P. 



4:30 P. 
•5:00 p. 



til :45 p. 



9:03 A. 

•7:56 a 

6:35 a, 

+7:40 p. 



7:50 a. For Meulo Park and Way Stations 
(For San Jose, Gilroy, 'Ires') 

Pinos, Pajaro, Sauta Cruz, I 
, Monterey, Salinas, Sau Mi I 
] gnel, Paso Robles and Tern- [ 

pletou (Sau Luis Obispo) 
[ aud principal Way Stations. I 
(For San Jose, Almaden and) 

j Way Stations 1 

j For Cemetery, Menlo Park ) 

I aud Way Stations j 

(For Sau Jose, Tres Pinos.i 
< Sauta Cruz, Monterey, and> 
( principal Way Stations. J 
tFor Sau Jose aud principal) 

} Way Stations ( 

For Menlo Park and Way Stations 
For Menlo Park aud Way Stations 
' For Meulo Park aud priucipal | 

Way Stations . ( j 

A. for Morning. p. for Afternoon. 

•Sundays excepted. fSaturdays ouly. 

ISuudays only. ^Saturdays excepted. 

HFridays only. **Moudays excepted. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST AND BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3 o'clock p. M., for YOKO- 
HAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at Yoko- 
hama with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Steamer. 1889. 

Beloic Saturday, January 5. 

Arabic Thursday, January 24. 

Oceanic Wednesday, February 13. 

Gaelic Saturday. March 2. 

Belgic Thursday, March 20. 

ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES. 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Towuseud streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, atthe 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, or at 
No. 202 Market street(Union Block)Sau Francisco. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 

GEO H. RICE, Traffic Manager. [Dec. 29. 

PflTfl You can live ot homo and make more money at work for us 
«*■*> Iton at unvililngelseintho world. Either sex; oil ages. Cost- 
ly outfit FliEE. Terms FKEE. Address, TRUE & CO., Augusta, Maino. 



AS IT WAS WROTE. 

sin- '■ needed the situation so bad, 11 

Bbe said, with n charming am He, 
That I paid oil the type-writing youth I had, 

And took her to try awliih'. 
She came next morn with a yellow bow 

At the Bide o( her snow-white throat. 
41 I 'd no idea that a girl would be so 

Much nicer/ 1 I thought, as she wrote. 
Butthls was her first letter, 11 Deresurwi 

Bum Murshandise c o d 
An at rusting Ynre ade too our plans yule lend 

Were yoarne most trdoly A. I'.." 
Wondering, 1 questioned her as she turned, 

And fingered the keys SO well. 
"At a lightning type-writing college I learned, 

But we hadn't no time to spell." — Time. 

An old country gentleman returning rather 
lute, discovered a yokel with a lantern under 
his kitchen window, who. when asked his busi- 
ness there, stated he had only come a-court- 
iug. 

"Come a what? " said the irate gentleman. 

" A-courting, sir. I\se courting Mary." 

" It's a lie. What do you want a lantern 
for? I never used one when I was a young 
man." 

" No, sir? " was the yokel's reply ; " [ didn't 
think yer 'ad, judgin'by the missus." 

— Exchange. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 

— A Nil— 

SONOMA VALLEY RAILROADS. 

"THE DONAHUE BROAD-GAUGE ROUTE." 

COMMERCING SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2. 1888, aad 

until further notice. Boats aud Trains will 
leave from awl arrive at the Shu Prauci 
seuger Depot, MARKKT-Sl'KKET WHARF, a* 
follows: 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's Steamers will sail 
For New York via Panama, 

S. S. San Blas. . Saturday, Jan. 12, 1889, at 12 noon. 
Taking Freight and Passeugers direct for Mazat- 
lau.Sau Bias, Manznuillo, Acapulco, Champerico, 
Sau Jose de Guatemala, La Libertad aud Panama. 
And via Acapulco for all other Mexican aud 
Central American Ports. 

For Hongkong via Yokohama, 

S.S. City of Peking Tuesday, Jan. 15, 1889,at 3 p.m. 

S. S. City of Sydney Monday, Feb. 4, at 3 p. m. 

S. S. City of Rio de Janf.iro Feb. 21st, at 3 p. m. 
S 8. City of New York Monday, March 11, at 3 p.m. 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and return at 
reduced rates. 

For Freight or Passage apply at the Office, coi 
ner First and Brannan streets. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

General Agents. 
Geo. H.Rice, Traffic Manager. [Jan. 5. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

Carrying U. S., Hawaiian and Colonial Mails. 

Will leave the Company's Wharf, foot of Steuart 
aud Folsom streets. 

For Honolulu: 

8. 8. Australia (3,000 tons) . ..Jan. 2, 1889, at 2 p. m 

For Honolulu, Auckland and 
Sydney, Without Change: 

The Splendid New 3,000-ton Iron Steamer 

Zealandia Saturday, Jan. 12th, at 2 p. m 

Or immediately on arrival of the English mails. 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar- 

JOHN D. SPREOKELS & BROS., 
Dec. 29.] General Ageuts. 

MOUNT VERNON CO., BALTIMORE. 

tf^* The undersigned having been appointed 
AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST for the sale 
of the manufactures of above company, have now 
in store : 

Sail Duck— all Numbers; 

Hydraulic— all Numbers; 

Draper and Wagon Duck, 

From 30 to 120 Inches Wide, and a Complete As- 
sortment of All Qualities 28J^-Inch DUCK, from 
7 ozs. to 15 ozs., inclusive. 
MURPHY, GRANT & CO. 

DR. RICQRD'S RESTORATIVE PILLS. 

Buy None but the Genuine— A Specific for Ex- 
hausted Vitality, Physical Debility, Wasted Forces, 
etc.— Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
aud the Medical Celebrities. Ageuts for California 
and the Pacific States, J. G. STEELE & CO., 635 
Market street, (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. Sent 
by mail or express anywhere. PRICES REDUCED. 
Box of 50 pills, $1 25; of 100 pills, $2: of 200 pills, 
$3 50; of 400 pills, $6. Prepa^'ory Pills, *2. 

Send for Circular. 



Leave S. F. 


Destination. 


Arrive in 8. F. 


Week 
Days. 


Sundays 


Suudays 


Wtvk 
Days. 


7:40 a.m. 
8;S0 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 
5:00 P.M. 


Petaluma 

aud 

Sauta Kosa. 


10:40 a. m 
6:10p.M 


B:60a. h. 
U:40a.m 

6:Ufi P. M. 


;:::.:::! :.: 

7:40a. m.i8:00a.m. 
3:30p.m. 

I 


Fultou 

Windsor, 
Healdsburg, 
Cloverdale & 
Way Stations. 


6:10 p.m. 




11 W l.M 

G:05p.m 


7:40a.m.|8:0Oa.m. 


Guerueville. 0:10p. M. 


6:05 p.m. 


3:30 p.m. 


8:00a.m. 


Souoma and l ft ..„,.M. 
Glen E118U. I °- 40a . 


8:50 a.m. 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for White Sulphur 
Spriugs, Sebastopol and Mark West Springs; at 
Geyserville for SKaggs Spriugs, and at Cloverdale 
for Highland Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, 
Lakeport, Saratoga Spriugs, Blue Lakes, Bartlett 
Spriugs, Ukiah, Vichy Spriugs, Navarro Ridge, 
Mendocino City and the Geysers. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days— To Petaluma, ?1 75; to Santa Rosa, $3: to 
Healdsburg, $4 : to Cloverdale, ?5 j to Sonoma, $1.50 ; 
to Glen Elleu, $2.25. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sunday only— 
To Petaluma, $1 50; to Santa Rosa, ?2; to Healds- 
burg, $3: to Cloverdale. $4 50; to Guerueville, $3; 
to Sonoma, $1; to Glen Ellen, $1.50. 

From Sau Francisco for Point Txburon aud San 
Rafael, Week Days— 7:40, 9:40 a. m.; 3:30, 5:00, 6:15 
p. M. Suudays— 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 a.m.; 5:00 p. M. 

To San Fraucisco from San Rafael, Week Days— 
6:20, 7:55,10:4') a. m.; 3:40, 5:05 p. m. Sundays— 8:10, 
9:40 a.m.; 3:40, 5:00 p. M. 

To San Francisco from Point Tiburon, Week 
Days— 6:50, 8:20, 11:05 A. M.; 4:05, 5:30 p. M. Sun- 
days— 8:40. 10:05 a. m.; 4:05,5:30 p.m. 

On Saturdays an extra trip will be made from 
San Fraucisco to San Rafael, leaving at 2:00 p. m. 
H. C. WHITING, PETER J. MCGLYNN, 

General Supt. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 

*W-TICKET OFFICES-At Ferry, 222 Montgomery 
Street and No. 2 New Montgomery Street. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: 

The steamers MEXICO and UMATILLA direct 
for VICTORIA, B. C, aud PI GET SOUND ports, 
at 9 a. M. every Friday. 

The steamer UMATILLA, sailing every other 
Friday, at 9 a. m., connects at Port Towuseud 
with Steamers IDAHO aud ANCON for Alaska. 

Fob PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with 
the O. R. AND N. CO., every four days. 

FOR SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, SAN 
Simeon, Caytjcos, Port Harford, San Luis Obis- 
po, Gaviota, Santa Barbara, San Buenaven- 
tura, Hueneme, San Pedro, Los Angeles and 
San Diego, about every second day. 

For EUREKA. ARCATA and HOOKTON, Hum- 
boldt Bay, Tuesday, at 9 a. m.— LOS ANGELES. 

FOR POINT ARENA, MENDOCINO, etc., every 
Monday aud Thursday, at 4 p. M. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 214 Montgomery street, 
Near Pine. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Geu'l Agents, 

Sept. 1.] No. 10 Market street, Sau Fraucisco. 

CUNARD LINE. 

NEW YORK TO LIVERPOOL via QUEENSTOWN. 

From Pier 40, North River— Fast Express Mail Service. 

Uml>ria . .Jan.5, 8 A.M. I Etruria..Feb.2,6:30 a.m. 
Bothuia Jan. 12,2:30p.m. | Aurania Feb. 9. noon. 
Gallia. Jan. 19, 6:30 a.m. I Umbria Feb. 16, 5.30 A.M. 
Servia Jan. 26, 1 P.M. | Servia . . Feb. 23, noon. 

Cabiu passage, $60, $30 and $100; intermediate, 
$35. Steerage tickets to and from all parts of 
Europe at verv low rales. 

For freight and passage apply to the Company .s 
offices, 4 Bowling Green, New York. 

VERNON H. BROWN &. CO., General Agents. 

Good accommodations can always be secured on 
application to WILLIAMS, DIMOND&CO., Ageuts 
San Fraucisco. [Dec. 29. 

Great push for Muller's Holiday Goods, 135 
Montgomery street, near Bush, opposite Occi 
deutal Hotel. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 5, 1889. 




vf \ I / HE question of the nature of thunder 
L A and the reproduction of lightning by- 
photography is more than ever dis- 
_^ cussed. M. Moussette, well known 
to our readers, has at last given in 
Nature the results in England by the Royal Meteorological Society of 
collecting and condensing materials, and wishes to do as much in 
France. 

" It is very hard," says Professor Tonry, "to convince some peo- 
ple that a glass of perfectly clear, colorless water, with no odor or 
taste, may be more impure than water coming from the kitchen sink 
which has been used to wash cooking utensils, yet in many cases I 
have found such water." This is a striking statement, but Mr, Ton- 
ry is able to demonstrate that it is based on a multitude of well-stud- 
ied facts. There is absolutely no pure water in nature, but there are 
limits beyond which the contamination of drinking or cooking water 
cannot safely be allowed to go. The presence of chlorine in water 
indicates the kind of organic impurity dangerous to health. A drop 
of solution of nitrate of silver is a convenient test. If it produces in 
a tumbler of the water in question a white cloud, chlorine and its re- 
lated impurities are present to a probably dangerous extent. Boiling 
will , as a rule, destroy disease germs. The popular theory that freez- 
ing purifies water, Mr. Tonry thinks is incorrect. "Pure ice," he 
says, " is almost as hard to obtain as pure water." He mentions a 
case where typhoid fever was traced directly to the use of impure ice. 

— Baltimore Sun. 

According to M. Moussette, thunder or its furrow or path would be 
produced by the passage of a veritable projectile, of weak mass, but 
propelled with great velocity. Thunder, then, according to this 
hypothesis would be always more or less globular. 

M. de Fouvielle had given a like theory in his book, " Eclairs et 
Tonuerre," but according to him matter transported by thunder and 
given off in a great number of figurations, has been all along in 
trajectory by electric fluid. Those substances which one finds on the 
surface of individual sidereal bodies would be caused by a multitude 
of particles suspended in the atmosphere, which would be agglomer- 
ated by a grand coup de balai. This odd expression belongs to Arago, 
who has applied it to a dash of rain through a dusty atmosphere. 
The theory of M. de Fouvielle was suggested to him by observing the 
passage of an electric Hash through a tube tilled with air, or between 
the two poles of a RhumkorfF battery. 

According to him one might perhaps have projectile in the case of 
ascending thunder, the material particles being thrown off from the 
objects serving as starting point; but in the case of descending thun- 
der there would be little save particles of vapor, which might serve 
as initial projectile. 

M. Moussette as well gives some directions for obtaining results 
and preventing erroneous conclusions. 

A Commission of the Academy, composed of MM. Fizeau, Bec- 
querel, Cornu aud Mascart, will investigate the subject. 

— Translated from " La Lumiere Electrique." 

Artifiical Emeralds.— At a recent session of the French Academy 
of Sciences, Mr. Daubree, in behalf of Messrs. Hautefeuille and Perrey, 
presented an interesting note on the production of emeralds. These 
learned chemists have succeeded in producing very beautiful crystals 
of emerald by fusing silica, alumina and glucina (with traces of oxide 
of chromium) with acid molybdateof lilhia. The materials were heat- 
ed to a temperature of from 000 deg. to 700 deg. for fifteen days. There 
was obtained 15 grammes of small crys^ls of about a millimetre, 
having all the mineralogical and physical characters of the natural 
emerald. The longer the operation is continued the larger the 
crystals become. —Annates Indtistrielles. 

Steam pipes of copper are now made by electro deposition from 
sulphate of copper solution. The pipe is formed on an iron core in 
the depositing bath, and the deposited copper is pressed by a mov- 
ing tool as it is deposited, so as to give a fibrous strength to the 
crystalline copper. After the pipe is thus formed it is subjected to 
hot steam, which expands the copper shell, or pipe, clears off the iron 
core, thus separating the two. These pipes have no joint, and are 
said to be very strong, tests showing that they break with strains of 
from twenty-seven to forty-one tons per square inch. 

Pictet's New Ice Machine.— One of the objects attracting consid- 
erable attention at the Jubilee Exhibition in Vienna is the new ice 
machine devised by M. Pictet of Geneva, who has come to Vienna to 
personally superintend his exhibit and introduce this machine in 
Austria. In general principles the machine does not differ from 
others, but there are some important modifications in detail. In- 
stead of using sulphurous acid, as in his previous machines, M. 
Pictet uses a mixture of sulphurous acid and carbonic acid, which has 
received the name of "liquide pictet." — Industries. 

The oldest and largest tree in the world is a chestnut near the fool 
of Mt. Etna. The circumference of the main trunk is 212 feet. 



UNDERSTOOD. 

Painted and perfumed, feathered and pink, 

Here is your ladyship's fan. 
You gave it to me to hold, I think, 

While you danced with another man. 

Downy and soft like your fluffy hair, 

Pink like your delicate face; 
The perfume you carry everywhere 

Wafted from feathers and lace. 

Painted and perfumed, dainty and pink, 

A toy to be handled with care; 
It is like your ladyship's self, I think, 

A trifle as light as the air. 

For you are a wonderful triumph of art, 

Like a Dresden statuette; 
But you cannot make trouble for my poor heart, 

You innocent faced coquette. 

For I understand those enticing ways 

You practice on every man ; 
You are only a bit of paint and lace, 

Like that delicate toy— your fan. 

— Edith Sessions Tu/iper. 



S. F. News Letter will be sent weekly to any address in the United States 
for $1.25 for 3 months, $2.50 for 6 months, or $5*for 12 mouths. The subscrip- 
tion for the Continent, Great Britain and the Colonies is: 3 months, $1 60; 
6 months, $3; 12 mouths, $6. All subscriptions are payable in advauce, and 
checks and P. O. O.'s should be made payable to Publisher S. F. News 
Letter, Flood Building, Market street, S. F. 



TJSr&TTttjLjSrCD^n. 




D. J. STAPLES, President. 
ALPHEUS BULL, Vice-President. 



Insurance Company. 

. .$1,000,000, I ASSETS $2,260,000. 

I WILLIAM J. DUTTON, Secretary. 
| B. FAYMONVILLE, Ass't Secretary. 

Agents in nil prominent localities throughout the United States. [Aug. 25. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

ORGANIZED 1864. 
Principal Office 216 Sansome Street 

FIRE INSURANCE. 
Capital Paid Up in U. S. Gold Coin $300,000.00 

Losses p'd since organi'n.?2,667,366.43 I Reinsurance Reserve ...% 230,330.36 

Assets January 1, 1888 816,627.14 NetSurplus(overev'ryth'g) 277,963.78 

Surplus for policyholders.. 808,294.14 | Income in 1887 354,683.66 

OFFICERS: 

J. F. HOUGHTON President I CHAS. R. STORY Secretary 

J. L. N. SHEPARD, . . .Vice-President I R. H. MAG1LL General Agent 

Directors of the Home Mutual Insurance Co. — L. L. Baker, H. L. Dodge, 
J. L. N. Shepard John Curry, J. P. Houghton, John Sinclair, C. Waterhouse 
Chauncey Taylor, S. Huff, C. T. Ryland, A. K. P. Harmon. [March 3. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul aud smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class Companies, or Grain sold, if 
desired, at current rates. 

Office of the Company, 412 PINE ST., San Francisco, Cal. \ Nov. 19. 

AGGRE6ATE ASSETS, $46,000,000- 

London Assurance Corporation of London [Established by Royal 

Charter 1720.] 
Northern Assurance Company of London [Established 1836.] 
Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool [Established 1857.] 
Connecticut Fire Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 
S. E. Cor. California and Montgomery Streets. Safe Deposit Building. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000, 000 

Reserve Fund (in addition to Capital) 2,125,000 

Total Assets Julu 1, 1887 6,809,629 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

July 16.] 305 California Street, San Francisco. 



Jan. 5, 1881). 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



27 



SUNBEAMS. 

Eminem Stat- moan (walking up i«> raporter> -My face la tamlliar 
to \«'u. I |»r«-iiiiif ' Reporter 1 have* certainly seen you Bomawfaero, 
amt >»t | cannot exactly — " Eminent Statesman There la no ase 
in trying to keep anything from the watchful eye ol ■ reporter. You 
. .- me, uJ course, u Congressman Blank? Reporter — Why . 
soil i-' May l inquire, sir. the object of your visit to our locality Y 
Rmiiient Siaieanian (with dignity) You may Bay. sir. that 1 am 
traveling through here in a quiet way. and as Far us possible avoiding 
publicity, — Chicago IWfrifns. 

'• Do you think." saiil Mrs. Killin. of San Francisco, "that my 
daughter la sufficiently Intelligent to enter your seminary ? " " l am 
sorry to -ay. madam," replied the Boston teacher, " that your daugh- 
ter doesn'i know the difference between a common ami a proper 
noon." "She don't I Well, have bet taught Btraight off! I don't 
want anything common about her. She must use only proper nouns 
in her speech." — Time. 

Mr. Beecham— Havt- you seen anything of my snake-skin cigar- 
case, FryeT His Valet— 1 did, sor. Mr. Beecham— Where is it? 
His Valet (reluctantly) — That MisthflV Fackley, from Cinchinnati, 
who wor ealHii* laabt night pit it in his pocket phin he left, an' Oi 
beered him say he couldn't let a >a usage go a-beggin', sor. —Time. 

Minister (discussing religious matters)— Of course. Mr. Hendricks, 
one ran be loo narrow in his ideas regarding the observance of the 
Babbath, but there is fishing, for instance. Do you think it is right 
t<» Hah on Sunday? Mr. Hendricks (evasively)— Well— er— I think I 
would draw the line at fishing on Sunday. * — Texas Si/tings. 



iisrsxjE.^isrcE. 



" Nobody knows but mother." 
Was the song she'd often sing. 

Before upon her linger 
He placed the wedding ring. 



And now that he is married, 
He finds she is a shrew, 

And day by day he 's learning 
How much her mother knew. 
— N. Y. News. 



Bobby has been imparting to the minister the important and 
cheerful information that his father has got a new set of false teeth. 
'■ Indeed. Bobby," replied the minister, indulgently. '' and what will 
he do witb the old set?" " Ob, I s'pose," replied Bobby, " they'll cut 
em down and make me wear 'em. — Life. 

Young Poet: " You read my little poem. Mr. Sheerce?" Editor: 
" Yes. lit was quite pathetic. It excited considerable comment in 
the office. The boy who attends to such matters informs me that it 
was the first poem he ever burned which was so full of tears as to 
put the fire out." — Terre Haute Express. 

Amy-" I took my parrot to church." Lu — " Did he behave well?" 
Amy-" Well, so so, the sermon was long and he said 'Jesus ' several 
times." Lu — " Well, that is all right." Amy — " Oh, but you should 
have heard the intonation and have seen his look." — Town Topics. 

Miss Scaler— If you will kindly stop that interminable overture, 
professor, I shall be glad to begin. Professor Von Thalon — Ah, 
madam, youst ri think vat more bleasure ve geds from der andizziba- 
tion den from de rcalidy in dis life. — Judge. 

Young Wife (at a ball)— You are improving wonderfully as a dan- 
cer. Don't you remember how you used to tear my dresses? Young 
Husband— Y-e-s; I wasn't buying 'em then.— Philadelphia Record. 

Unwelcome Suitor— That's a lovely song! It always carries me 
away. She— If 1 had known how much pleasure it could give us both, 
I should have sung it earlier in the evening. — Life. 

"You bet the necktie would not fit," 

She said: " It- does; your bet now pay." 
He answered her: " All bets are off 
Where there's a tie, so experts say." 

— Boston Courier. 

A black high-weigh-man— An honest coal dealer.— N. Y News. 

Mother — "Goodness me! Is that Irene at the piano?" Little 
Son—" Yes, ma.' ? " Well, go ask her what she is doing. If she is 
practicing, she can keep on until the hour is up; but if she is playing, 
tell her to stop." — Philadelphia Record. 

"What were you laughing at so loudly this evening?" asked Mrs 
Brown, when her husband came upstairs to bed. " I was telling 
that old schoolmate of mine a very funny story." "But I didn't 
hear him laugh." " No," growled the old man, " that fellow is an 
ass." — New York Sun. 

Biotterwick— I see that the bustle is no longer worn. His Wife — 
Where did you see that, my dear? Biotterwick (meekly) — In the 
newspapers. His Wife (sharply)— Well, when you see it in the street, 
just let me know. —Time. 

Eggs that were laid away with the Egyptian mummies, thousands 
of vears ago, have been discovered, and there are some people who 
believe that not a few of them have found their way into the grocery 
stores of 1888. — Louisville Courier-Journal. 

Grace— -I hear. Mamie, that you're engaged. Mamie — It's quite 
true. " Then mother was right, Mamie." "What about, Grace?" 
" She said you'd get engaged before leap year was over." 

" What are you doing to that man? " " He can't pay his fare and 
the conductor is ejecting him." "Is he angry?" " lio. He's put 
out." — Epoch. 

" Did I understand you to say her baby is the image of her hus- 
band? " " Not at all. I said of its father." —Exchange. 

" Bsgorra, Mrs. Clancey, me owld man's on a tear." " Then let 
him rip, Mrs. Dennis." 

" That's the worst thing I ever got off," said a professional joker 
as he scraped a sick egg from his coat. 

How to cure a "masher "—Mash him. — N. Y. News. 

An engagement ring is a kind of promising affair. — Boston Times. 

A False Roomer— One who departs without paying his room-rent. 

A Sham-rock— The one on the stage. 

A Chest-protector— A baggage check. 



THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

(KSTAllI.ISHED 1871.] 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up $400,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 218 AND 220 iANSOME STREE1 

San Francisco, California. 
GEORGE L. BRANDER, CHA8. H. 008HJNG, P. J. Will IK, 

President. Secretary. Vice-President. | 

Board of Directors— D. Callaghau, P. J. White, J. M. Donahue, GEO. 
L. Brandex E. L. Goldstein, L. Guuuiugham, M. Kane, Fisher Ames, It 
O. F. Buckley, Dr. Wra. Joues, G. II. Whcatou, T. McMulliu, 11. 11. Watson 
H. Dlmoud, P. Bolaud. |Sept. 1. 



COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

CAPITAL, Paid In Full S 200.000.00 

ASSETS. December 31. 1887 434.194.76 

LOSSES Paid Since Company was Organized 1.846.704.24 

JOHN H. WISE, President. 
CHA8. A. Laton, Secretary. 

Principal Office 439 California Street, 

(Safe Deposit Building). [March 10.] San Francisco, Cal. 

THE SOUTH BRITISH 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW ZEALAND. 
capital s10.000ai 

Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

Office— 213 and 215 Sansome Street San Francisco. 

A. S. MURRAY, Manager. 

London Office — No. 2 Royal Exchange Auenue, Cornhlll, E. C. (March 5. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $9,260,000 

Cash Assets 2.764.875 

Cash Assets In United States 1,398,646 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

GENERAL AGENTS, 
316 California Street. San Francisco. March 20. 

AN6L0-NEVADA ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

FIRE AND MARINE.— Capital, Fully Paid, $2,000,000. 
OFFICE, 410, PINE STREET. 

Bankers: THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

[Sept. 10.1 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL $5,000,000 

AGENTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

Nov. 18 1 No. 316 California Street. San Francisco. 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1782.] 
American Fire Insurance Co. of New York [Estab. 1857.] 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
July 16.1 413 California Street, San Francisco. 

THE EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY, 

Assets $84,378,905 

Sirplus $18,104,255 

This Society pays about five million dollars annually to the widows and 
orphans of deceased policy-holders. 

NORTH & SNOW, Managers for Pacific Coast, 

Oct. 27.] 405 Montgomery Street, S. F. 

THE SWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

SWITZERLAND of Zurich— Capital, 6,000,000 Francs. HELVETIA of St. 
Gall— Capital, 10,000,000 Francs. B ALOISE of Basle— Capital, 5,000,000 Francs. 
These three companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that 
may be sustained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the 
world. In the settlement of all claims under an English policy, these com- 
panies will strictly adhere to the conditions aud customs adopted at Lloyds' 
and submit to English jurisdiction. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 410 California 
street, San Francisco. [June 9.] 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

CAPITAL $10,000,000. 

W. J. CALLLNGHAM General Agent, 

420 California Street, ""S Francisco, Cal. [March 19 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Nov. 5, 1889. 




ORD SALISBURY has lately been making some speeches in 

K Edinburgh, in which the Tory Minister has pronounced for 
woman's suffrage. Now that the Prime Minister is on the 
side of the angels, success would appear to be certain, prob- 
ably within the life of the present Parliament. Lord Salisbury 
justified his advocacy of the claims of womeu to the suffrage quite 
simply and straigbtly, saying that in his opinion the influence of wo- 
men -, is likely to weigh in a direction, which in an age so material 
as ours, is exceedingly valuable, namely, in the direction of morality 
and religion, as not only representing a fact in the past, but as en- 
shrining a policy for the future. The friends of woman's suffrage on 
both sides of the House appear to believe that Lord Salisbury's 
declaration has brought the question within the range of practical 
politics. 

Lord Randolph Churchill, though, has emphatically declared 
against it, and, it seems, by so doing has strained the tie to snapping 
point which has hitherto bound him to the Conservative party, who 
now expect him to use such influence as he possesses to prevent any 
alteration in the law; but as Lady Randolph is in favor of the en- 
franchisement of her sex, it is likely that she may bring her noble 
lord to her way of thinking. We are of opinion that the nursery and 
the drawing-room are more suitable fields for female activity than 
the cross-benches and the tearoom at the House of Commons— al- 
; though Lord Salisbury doesn't say that women shall become members 
: of Parliament, only that they shall be entitled to vote for members. 
Because there may be a handful of women who might make use- 
ful Senators, that is no reason why a general political suffrage to 
women should prove a universal success. The condition of women's 
proper lives is a distinct barrier against their ever prospering as poli- 
ticians. 

The relations between Monarch and Minister in Montenegro seem 
to be of a rough-and-ready character, yet on an excellent principle, 
one which would prevent much departmental mischief in other lands. 
One of the Ministers was soundly flogged for rather a grave error, 
ll seems that the Minister of Public Instruction, finding that the in- 
come from his sinecure was not sufficient for his wants, purloined and 
sold some of the State (!) archives. It has always been known that 
the Montenegrins have many queer customs, such as cutting off their 
enemies' noses and impaling their prisoners, but the latest piece of 
news from the brigand principality is even more curious. The Min- 
ister was sentenced to five years imprisonment, and in addition to 
receive fifty strokes from a birch rod. The " hint " was administered 
to the Ministers in the museum of* the august Monarch, Prince 
Nicholas, who was pleased with the operation, and who saw that all 
was done fairly and according to method. The youth of Montenegro 
are also delighted, believing that they will for the future be exempt 
from an operation which has proved so disagreeable to their late chief. 

If the Parisians would only read the foreign newspapers, more 
[ specially the London- dailies, with their striking head lines, they 
would be doubtless astounded at the events that are taking place 
: among them, and to which they pay no attention. The present 
times are certainly confused and tumultuous. It is said that some 
drink openly to the fall of the existing rugime. Cluseret, the Com- 
munist general, has been elected to the Chamber of Deputies by the 
Department of the Vur, and a man whose disgrace was thought to be 
complete, like Wilson, son-in-law of M^Grevy, returns calmly to the 
scene of action and begins to play a role that terrifies his less cynical 
colleagues. Floquet dreams vaguely of a coup d' etat, but instead of 
taking the matter tragically, the Parisians laugh at the comicality of 
such a scheme. It looks as if even the politicians themselves were 
getting sick of politics. No wonder that men of all ranks and every 
i shade of opinion are beginning to welcome anybody — even a Pre- 
' tender who has his spurs to win — who will promise them a relief from 
the domination of a Chamber which includes men like Cluseret et id 
genus omne. All this, of course, is only the prologue, the real play 
will begin when the peasants intervene in the elections this year and 
either confirm the Republic or go over to Monarchism or Bou- 
langism. 

Another German colonial settlement seems to be pretty much on 
its hist legs. The state of things in New Guinea seems almost as bad 
as it is in East Africa. The Governor is about to resign, and accord- 
ing to a Munich newspaper the financial condition of the New Guinea 
Company is quite serious. The expenditure of money, upon which 
(here is not the most remote chance of any return, has led to a rumor 
that the Company has offered to sell its territories to the German 
Empire for the modest sum of $1,000,000. Judging from the expe- 
rience we have had of German colonization in Africa, it would seem 
that the only business in which the German colonists are experts is 
that of graciously accepting a charter from the German Government, 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



The State Investment and Insurance Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the above-named 
company, for the election of a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, will be held at the office of the Company, Nos. 218 and 220 Sansome 
street, on 

Tuesday, the 8th day of January, 1889. at the hour of 12 o'clock M. 

CHS. H. CUSHING, Secretary. 
San Francisco, December 20, 1888. [Jan. 5. 



and then of magnanimously asking the Government, after a lapse of 
a couple of years, either to spend a few millions more in vindicating 
their authority or buy back the charter for a good round sum. Bis- 
marck's idea in encouraging his people in their colonial craze seems to 
have been more for the sake, as it appears to us, to have something 
to offer to England in return for her assistance in case of need in any 
future complications on the Continent. Bismarck knows pretty well 
that if England can, as it were, be neglected in Europe, in the world 
she is the only power without whom nothing can be attempted. 

King Milan of Servia is in an awkward pickle. His divorce from 
Queen Natalie, although sanctioned by a commission of courtly pre- 
lates, has inspired the country with such disgust for him and his 
doings that it has elected a majority of Opposition members to the 
national Skuptschina, and the King cannot get his little project of a 
revised constitution adopted. Indeed, it is quite probable that the 
country will give Milan his walking papers, for there is no lack of 
precedents. Since 1804, when the Serbs revolted against the Turks, 
there have been three forced abdications— to say nothing of two 
assassinations — in the lines of six sovereigns, representing two rival 
dynasties. 

The grand old man of England is now in Italy, where he ate his 
Christmas dinner. The change of climate in the Winter is said to 
grow more and more necessary than ever in regard to the bronchial 
affection from which Mr. Gladstone has for a long time past been 
suffering, and it is said to be freely rumored that at no distant date 
he will be compelled to give up Parliamentary work altogether. For 
their own sakes, it would seem better that the two grand old men — 
Gladstone of England and Lesseps of France— should spend the re- 
mainder of their days in retirement, which we should hope would 
not be disagreeable to either of them. 

The new Commissioner of Police in London appointed to succeed 
Sir C. Warren has some difficult work before him in taking the com- 
mand of a force which has become, to a certain extent, discontented 
and disorganized. This post is one of a peculiar character, and it is 
difficult to infer the fitness of any nominee from his previous career; 
but Mr. Monro has, at all events, had a long and varied experience 
in the discharge of duties of an analogous kind, and, under all the 
circumstances of the case, the English government seems to have 
exercised a sound discretion in his appointment. Succeeding the 
two former Commissioners— Colonel Henderson, who did too little, 
and Colonel Warren, who did too much— guided by the failure of 
these predecessors, it is fair to conclude he will be found the right 
man in the right place. 

STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING. 

Office of the May Flower Gravel Mining Company, 

San Francisco, November 28, 1888. 

A special meeting of the stockholders of the May Flower Gravel Mining 
Company will be held at the office of the Company, 328 Montgomery street, 
room 24, on 

to take in consideration the matter of increasing the capital stock of the ! 
corporation, and also to make amendments to the By-Laws of the Company, ■ 
and such other business as may come before the meeting. By order of the j 
Directors. 

Dec. 8.1 J. MORIZIO, Secretary. 

The above meeting is postponed to January 5, 1889, same hour and place. 
Dec. 29.] J. MORIZIO, Secretary. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Sierra Nevada Silver 
Miuiug Compauv will be held at the office of the Company, room No. 15, 
Nevada Block, San Francisco, California, on 

Wednesday, the 16 h day of January, 1889, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M.. 
for the purpose of electing Trustees to serve for the ensuing year, and 
for the transaction of such other business as may legally come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will be closed on Monday, January 14, 1889. 

E L. PARKER, Secretary. 

Office— Room 15, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. j Jan. 5. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Bullion Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Bullion Mining 
Company will be held at the office of the Company, room 20, No. 327 Pine 
street, on 

Thursday, the 10th day of January, 1889, at 2 o'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors for the ensuing year, and 
the transaction of such other business as may come before the meeting. 
Transfer books will close on Monday. January 7, 1889, at 3 p. m. 

R. R. GRAYSON, Secretary. 
Office— Room 20, No. 327 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. [Dec 29. 



r»i xxxix. 



BUSHED I8B0J 



Number 3d 



News. Better 

tfnli forma Adbcrtiscr. 

DtVOTTD TO TMt LlADtM) INTERESTS Of CaUPWMIA AND TWE P^CIttO COAST. 

4 HVtly Journal of Thought It i* to Wound on Jlte in aftfAstead 
<"A" r tfmi, <nnf in <i rfcoQniznl authe 

turancr. Mining and other Stocks)— aU J'acinc Coa«l Industries 

tiH'l W'«"iiriV*. 

f» U«io«riM/l«tfe uwM («*■ Nawa Lbttrr Imp tinea attained <i /rvml place, 
an-i Um column* <tr, continuously quoted from by paper* scattered over the 
entire habitabU qtobe. 

ttium t its large circulation and influential position make 
tt particularly useful 

' and Published ever u Saturda >;}•>/ the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 
id BuiUttng, fourth and Ma Jan Francisco, Annual Sub- 

tcriptt'mi, tntludinQ I <• d State,* and Canada, 06; Foreign, $6. 

Registered at the Postoffiee at Ban FrancitOOj California, as second-class matter. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 1889. 

FINANCIAL REVIEW. 



mllK recent purchase by Senator Jones of the Flood interest 
in the Mariposa estate again directs attention to this valu- 
able and extensive tract of mineral land. It was first dis- 
X, covered in the early days of California by a pioneer miner 
familiarly known to his associates to-day as " Quartz" John- 
son. It is located in Mariposa county, at the southern extremity of 
the wonderful " Mother lode," traversing in a direct and well- 
well-defined course five interior counties. Its breadth varies at dif- 
ferent points along the entire length, widening out to a greater extent 
towards its terminus in Mariposa. On it are located our leading 
gold mines, many of which have produced continuously for the past 
twenty-five years. Among the more prominent may he mentioned 
the Idaho, Plymouth, Amador, Church, Union, Zeile and Quin,al1 of 
which have a bullion record of millions, the source of many private 
furtunes. Such has been the reputation of this lode for continuity 
that much ingenuity has been time and again exercised by mine- 
owners off the favored lead to twist and contort its course on special 
maps so as to include their property, and thereby impruve its value 
in the market. Nine-tenths of the properties offered in London are 
said to be located on the Mother lode, although it is not within miles 
of it. The Mariposa estate has not been worked for years, owing 
to litigation which grew out of the original grant. In the early days 
it was the scene of many a sanguinary struggle for the possession of 
the ground, Johnson himself holding it for nearly a year with a small 
regiment of men armed with rifles. The property finally got into 
the courts, and on final settlement of the title the bonanza firm be- 
came the owners. It is not unlikely that an extensive plant will be 
erected this coming summer to work the vast ore deposits. At the 
north end of the lode is anothergroup of mines held by a mining cap- 
italist of this city under United States patent, which offer a splendid 
opportunity for the investment of foreign capital. They are known as 
the Maxwell Creek mines, and include some thirteen locations, extend- 
ing a distance of five miles along the lode, and taking in an offshoot 
or spur which occurs here, named the Companion lode. Two ofrtliese 
mines have already been worked to a depth of 200 feet, the gold 
product of one alone exceeding $3,000,000. The supply of ore here 
is practically inexhaustible, and the facilities for working peculiarly 
favorable. Water power is obtained from a ditch connecting with 
the Tuolumne River, but additional power to run a heavy stamping 
capacity all the year round could be conveyed by electricity from the 
Merced River, distant two and one-half miles. The ore is what is 
termed low grade, although much higher than that which has been 
milled for years past at the Plymouth, Zeile and Keystone mines. 
The promoter who can interest capital in this enterprise will win both 
fortune and reputation, while the State will be benefited by a mate- 
rial increase in its production of gold. 

The annual meeting of the Josephine Mining Company, held last 
month in London, resulted, us usual, in soft-soaping the sharehol lers 
into a condition of hopeful quiescence. Hamilton Smith, Jr., turned 
a somersault, and remodeled his last report to suit the exigencies of 
the occasion. The ruffled feathers of Superintendent Little were 
smoothed down in amends for the raking-over he received in July 
last, when expert Smith was on theground suffering from pangs of 
conscience or a threatening reduction of his clean-up on tne deal. 
The disparity between original assays of the ore and working returns 
was handled in a similarly flippant style, the onus of the whole busi- 
ness being finally shifted to the shoulders of Mr. Ross Browne, whose 
report, Mr. Smith cooly remarks, " was incorrect." We would like 
to inquire why this gentleman, of all others, was selected to examine 
the property for the purposes of sale. Mr. Browne is one of our most 
talented mining surveyors and a man of the highest reputation; but 
he certainly has not a practical knowledge of mining. Did Mr. 
Gillette, a member of the exploration company, purchase the Joseph- 
ine mine like a " pig in a poke," or on the opinion of Mr. Browne? 
Does Mr. Smith flatter himself that people out here are fools enough 
to believe that Gillette went it blind and invested his personal money 



in a property just because another man told bfm it was a mine? if 

he does bo simply underrate* the Intelligence >>( this mlnln 

Inanity. Mr. Gillette wires the important news thai ho 1 

Nice with Alvtnza Hayward, He will turn np in London in dne 

oourse, when the market is sufficiently active lor stui 

Perhaps, If be wore pressed, he Lriigbt be able to throw some light mi 

tin- transaction, and explain the extraordinary discrepancy bi 

the Browne assays and working result*. The loan of £3 the 

Company at 5 per cent, interest, by the firm of Smiths Dei 
was a clever piece ol business, it warded off a disagreeable demand 
for the return ol the thousands originally Invested by outside share 
holders, while it rurnlsbes an opening for escaping responsibility in 
the future. The shareholders, dassletl by the apparent liberality, 
are now buoyed up by the hope that the mine will eventually turn 
out all right. Mr Smith calculates to sink the shaft GOO feet with the 
amount subscribed, which is al the rate of $20 a foot. Ii will cost 
linn nearly double this amount to biuk the .shaft and put it in proper 
running order. 

A London contemporary, in heralding a threstened American 
mining'hoom in the approaching Spring, says: •■The movement ia 
to be led by Mr. Oenrgc 1>. Iloherts. who is entitled to the distinction 
of having been connected with mure mining failures than any other 
man in the XInited States." If so he will doubtless be Hbly assisted 
by the other honest miners of his set. now banded together in a syn- 
dicate known as the London Exploration Company, Limited. The 
reputation of the members of the Mutual Admiration Society is fully 
on a par with that of Mr. Roberts, ami recent operations in California 
mines will help to promote confidence among outside investors. 
Hamilton Smith can refer to his mining experiences in Venezuela 
and the Josephine of California, the Janins and De Crano to vari- 
ous schemes, the details of which can be supplied by Roberts. 
California has won some reputation in the past by thi4 distin- 
guished connection, and can afford to dispense with it in the 
future. Our miners have been living on style for many years, stylish 
promoters with stylish associations, all of which will now he readily 
exchanged for a few practical men who can bring some ready money 
into the country for development purposes. Little faith exists here 
in the syndicate's ability to boom anything, and only surprise is ex- 
pressed at the reckless manner in which the Rothschilds and Barings 
permit their names to be hawked about by such a notorious clique. 
The syndicate is simply looked upon as a feeble attempt, at a mining 
trust, and in this light is particularly distasteful to mine owners, who 
fully recognize that the only thing limited about the concern is the 
practical experience of its members, and their inability to back up loud 
talk with hard cash. 

The mining market on Pine street still hangs fire, and the chance? 
for the future seems as problematic as ever. The decline in prices 
was heavy in the North and Middle shares, the notable exceptions by 
the group of mines surrounding the Alta at Gold Hdl. These stocks 
were well maintained and the condition of the mines warrants the 
prtd ction that they will sell higher 1 efore very long. Shipments <>l 
bullion come along rapidly from Con. Virginia. Confidence, Alia. 
ISiorcross and Savage. Chollar during the week has milled the first 
shipment from workings at the new mill. The value has not yet been 
made public. The Justice mill has started up with stamps. The 
Silver King election was carried by the local management, the East- 
ern contestants making a very poor showing. The Tincaroras have 
been quiet and lower. The new mill wdl soon be completed and con- 
centrating works are spoken of for Commonwealth. The bottom 
seems to have dropped out "of the t^uijatoas. lower prices rule now 
than for months past. An improvement is looked for in the general 
market if the Sutro Tunnel business is settled on the 14th inst. 

It is hinted that Mr. Louis Huller, one of the original incorporators 
of the International Land Company of Mexico, is about to publish a 
reply to Mr. Facio, the Government agent who recently returned a 
scathing report on the affairs of this company, advising the Govern- 
ment to annul its concession. Mr. Huller will find some difficulty 
in convincing American citizens that con iscation of private property 
is justifiable, concession or no concession. If a similar system of 
operations were attempted in this country or any other which can 
boast of a constitution guaranteeing the rights of the humblest citi- 
zen, Mr. Huller and his associates would not care to argue the point 
with such selt-complacency. Over the border, where it means a dun- 
geon or the knife of an assasin to criticise the policy of the Govern- 
ment, no matter how outrageous it may be, Mr. Huller may bolster 
up the case to his intense satisfaction, but his arguments will avail 
little in cloaking up the true condition of affairs, or in attracting 
capital to his enterprise. Investors are liable at any moment to have 
their titles rendered void by one of those concessions which seem so 
easily obtained in Mexico. 

The 1st of January statement of the Bank of California makes a 
gratifying exhibit of its condition, showing, as it does, assets amount- 
ing to* over $14,500,000, with a constantly increasing business and 
loans amply secured. 

The semi-annual statement of the Nevada Bank af San Francisco 
to January 1st makes a good showing, its total assets indicating 
nearly $0,000,000, well secured and available. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the San Francisco 
Gaslight Company will be held at the office of the company at 12 m. 
on Tuesday, the 15th day of January, 1880. 

Alvinza Hay ward is in Europe. He will not return for some weeks. 

Kobert Barton has returned from London. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 12, 18S9. 



THE " CHRONICLE" AFTER THE UNDERWRITERS- 

There is something rather peculiar in the fact that our " great 
family newspaper" suppresses its warm interest in the public and 
breaks out in righteous indignation periodically, and that period in 
its warfare against local. Eastern and foreign insurance companies 
always happens biennially, and upon the eve of the assembling of a 
State Legislature. Some exceptions are taken, however, to the pub- 
lished account in this " live " p^per of " interviews " never had, and 
of compact meetings which never ocf urred. In the former case, our 
authority for the statement is covered by the following clipping, 
taken from a January issue of the Pacific Underwriter : 
Another Lie Nailed. 

We have elsewhere in this journal referred to many false statements, 
and perversions of fact put forth from time to time by the Morning 
Chronicle of this city in the course of Us crusade against the insur- 
ance interests of the Pacific Coast. In the course of a bitter tirade 
in the Chronicle of this date (January 9th). we find several statements 
alleged to have been made by several business men well known in 
our communitv. As the result of interviews with several of them 
we are authorized to state that the interviews, so far as Captain Win. 
L. Merry, of Merry, Faull & Co., Captain Taylor of the Risdon Iron 
Works, and Mr. J. B. Stetson of Holbrook, Merrill & Stetson are 
concerned, are totally and absolutely false and untrue.' 

And this same paper, in the same issue, rather unfeelingly refers 
to the Chronicle's proprietor for its last Sunday's manufactured ac- 
count of a compact meeting supposed to have been held the Saturday 
before, as alleged, for base purposes: 

"Considerations which would induce an honest man to pause, 
however, have not the slightest effect on the hardened temperament 
of De Young. His ' nickel in the slot ' conscience only vibrates to 
financial twitches, and to such an extent is this the case that he re- 
sents now being approached without a fee in advance. The culmin- 
ation of this journal's mendacity, however, is expressed in the article 
that appeared in Sunday morning's issue. It purports to give the 
proceedings at a meeting of the Pacific Insurance Union on Satur- 
day last. The mutter contained is scandalous in the extreme, and 
we do not need the denials of the gentlemen who attended this meet- 
ing to brand the whole report as an infamous ' fake,' as discreditable 
to the writer as to the publishers. The story was maliciously in- 
tended and was manufactured out of whole cloth." 

The Pacific Union, as underwriters, have made a serious blunder 
in raising the rates on the Alcazar Theatre from public hall rates. 
This has displeased, aye, very much perturbed the Chronicle proprie- 
tor, and accounts for his malignity and persistence in interviewing 
" straw men " and manufacturing anti-compact testimony for the 
benefit of the public, likewise a pure and undefiled Legislature. As 
Voltaire puts it, " O, unfortunates who sin without pleasure ! in your 
errors be more reasonable; be, at least, fortunate sinners. Since you 
must be damned, be damned for amiable faults." 

BOLD AND BRAVE WORDS. 

The Governor "s Message is instinct with vigorous talk abont the 
wretched wrong-doing of those responsible for the conduct of our 
elections. He expresses thoughts that breathe in words that would 
burn if our officials had consciences that could be seared. In regard 
to this matter the blame has not lately been made to fall where it 
should. The Election Commissioners, who accept lists from the bosses 
of the men they should appoint, are responsible for what has oc- 
curred. It was their duty to make independent selections in the 
light of the best information they could obtain. When they evaded 
that they shirked the duty imposed upon them by law. When they 
accepted the nominees of Buckley and Higgins they either knew what 
would occur or they are too innocent to be safely entrusted with the 
power they wield. One of the greatest evils and faults of our system 
is, as the Governor so forcibly says, the manner in which election 
officers have been appointed, especially in San Francisco. " Men 
totally unfit, either by intelligence, morality or instinct, have been 
named as officers of election without a redeeming qualification in 
them. Men have been designated in the precincts to register, re- 
ceive, count and tally the votes, and make up as they pleased election 
returns, who would not scruple to resort to all that is vile in human 
nature to rob the respectable citizen of his birthright, either for a 
paltry reward of place, or for a consideration to advance the inter- 
ests of some scheming and debased politician." This description is 
not ours, but the Governor's. It has gone forth stamped with the 
authority of the Chief Magistrate of the State. But the evil is that 
it is addressed to and the cure must come from legislators, many of 
whom are the tools and creatures of the very system which is sought 
to be remedied. They are the product of this very rascality, and 
have been chosen for the express purpose of acting as its protectors. 
That is where the difficulty comes in. Corruption in politics is grow- 
ing upon what it feeds; is eating its way all around and permeating 
everything. The present election law is by no means a bad one. 
Though it can be improved upon, it has many excellent features 
which, in honest hands, would yield satisfactory results. The obtain- 
ment of honest hands is the difficulty. There are plenty such in San 
Francisco, but it seems impossible to place them in charge of the pol- 
ling places. If Mayor Pond and Auditor Strother could have 
afforded to ignore the bosses, the last election might have been con- 
ducted in a manner to have left nothing further to be desired. The 
law may well be strengthened in such a way as to compel future 
mayors and auditors to select a better class of citizens to guard the 
ballot-box. The law r-quires that now, but, as they dec inetoobey the 
law, penalties should be imposed upon future acts of disobedience. 



THE NEW CITY GOVERNMENT, 

The past week has witnessed the inauguration of a new city gov- 
ernment under a condition of things that is not as promising as it 
might be, but is nevertheless more hopeful than on many like occa- 
sions. It is not at all reassuring, for instance, that eleven out of the 
twelve Supervisors have been elected by the party which quietly ac- 
quiesces in the supreme sway of Buckley as Boss. Until it gives evi- 
dence of good work, little will be expected from the new Board. In 
regard to the heads of departments we believe that beneficial results 
will flow from the changes that have been made. Several of the new 
men owe their election to the fact that their names appeared on the 
non- Partisan ticket. They can afford to be and ought to be independ- 
ent of Boss control. If they clearly show that they are, they will 
surely win renominations, and do not a little to strengthen the non- 
partisan organization, to which they owed so much in the past, and 
from which they can gain so much in the future. If they prefer to 
be ignoble Boss tools rather than independent men, they can throw 
away a grand opportunity which is all their own. Mayor Pond is 
now more free to obey the mandates of the Consolidation Act than 
he was before. The majority of the departments have now Republi- 
can heads, whose ways be can from .time to time closely investigate 
without fear of giving offence to the Democratic Boss to whom he is 
content to owe allegiance. He knows his duty and is very capable of 
performing it. Upon the first whispering of crookedness in any of 
the departments, it is to be hoped he will use his large powers of in- 
quiring and investigating, and not listlessly permit things to go on 
from bad to worse as he did during his first term. The Mayor's du- 
ties are very far from being fully performed when he contents himself 
with presiding over the Board of Supervisors, and vetoing bad ordi- 
nances. The existing charter act imposes upon him further and 
much more onerous functions, as no man in the community better 
knows than E. B. Pond. Our Mayor is exceptionally well equipped 
for his office. He would like to be the next Governor of the State, 
and if during his present terra he can cut adrift from Buckleyism, 
his chances of success will be excellent. 

G. H. UMBSEN & CO., 

Real Estate Agents and General Auctioneers, 
Office and Salesroom, 14 Montgomery Street. 

REAL ESTATE AUCTION SALE 

Of Desirable Business and Residence Property, 

On Thursday, - - - January 17, 

AT 12 O'CLOCK NOON. 

California Street Residence. 
The elegant residence. 2"i03 California street, between Steiner and Pierce 
streets; 2 story aud baseme.it house, containing 10 rooms and bath, patent 
water-closets, servants' room aud laundry; all modern conveniences, aud 
iu excellent order; frae large stable and carriage-nouse; driveway at side 
of house; gardeu front aud rear; street sewered aud macadamized; mort- 
gage of $4,500, which can remain if desired: lot 31.4^x137:6. 

Folsom Street Investment. 

A fine bay-window nearly new building, 1036 Folsom street, between Sixth 
and Seventh streets; upper part in 2 Hats of 7 rooms aud bath each, aud 
store aud 3 rooms below; fine brick foundation ; the reut low, as follows: 
$25 each for flats aud $20 for store; entire rent $70 per mouth, which eau 
easily be inerea^ d, as Folsom street will have a cable within the near 
future, and is right in the business portion of the city ; lot 25x100. 

Richmond Lots. 

Lot 44:2x133— West line of 14th ave., 88:6 south of B st. 

Lot south side Clement st., 82:6 feet east of 5th ave. ; size, 25x100. 

Fillmore-Street Cottage. 

A neat cottage. 20fi Fillmore st., bet. Haight and Waller; contains 5 rooms, 
store-room aud wa.h room; good basement; lot 25x87:6; must be sold to- 
close an estate. 

Golden Gate Avenue Properties. 

Two fine near lv new bay-window houses; 1211, 1211Va Golden Gate ave., bet> 
Webster aud Fillmore sts. : each house contains 6 rooms and bath, bay win- 
dows and all modern improvements, Hower gardens, chickeu-houses, etc.;; 
patent stone sidewalks ; street sewered aud paved with bituminous pave- 
ment; lot 30x137:6. 

Lot on Eighteenth Street. 

Building lot south side of 18th street, 300 feet west of Church, bet. Churcfii 
and Sanchez sts. ; size, 25x114; street work all done; lot ready to build on. 
Small Cottage and Stable. 
No. 18, W. side of Gilbert st , between Branuan and Townsend, 6th and 
7th sts. ; contains 4 rooms and good. stable ; lot 24x80. 

Eastlake House, Johnson Avenue. 
Two-story house containing 9 rooms and bath; arranged for 2 families: 
reutiug for $20 per moutn; 25 Johnson ave., E. side, near Geary and Parker 
sts, ; lot 25x125, 

New Cottages. 
Three cottages containing 4 rooms each; also, a corner store building, 
with 4 rooms attached, situated on the northwest corner of Prospect place 
and Esmeralda ave; these cottages are located within a block and a half of 
the Mission or Valencia street cars, and command a fine view; lots 25x70 
each to rear street; '4 cash, balance in 1, 2 or 3 years, or easy installments; 
interest at 7 per cent per annum. 

Ltberty-street Cottage. 

a neat bay-window cottage, S. side of Liberty st., 285 feet west of Church 
st.- contains 5 rooms and bath; rough basement; brick foundation; lot 
25x114. FJan. 12. 



1889, 



Jan. 12, 



s\N FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



3 










A A ton 




E have htni sutih' truly delightful days 

weak, the Frosl and fog o! the 

riv mornings being followed by af- 

rnooos s " beautiful that (hey could 

nut have been Improved QpOD — and 
theory Is, " Why don't they last? " After a feast comes a 
famine, says the proverb, and its truth ran scarcely be dis- 
puted, for the feverish gaiety of the holiday weeks has been suc- 
oeededbya very decided chill in the gay world, the present week 
being almost barren of events, the moat momentous dancing one 
being the pink and white cotillion of the Bachelors' Club, given at B nai 
K'riih Hall last night, and of which I shall give details next week. 
Aside from Unit, dinners and party Calls receptions have been the 
chief dissipations of Late, and they have in the main proved pleasant 
and enjoyable. I often wonder how our fashionables would stand a 
gay >eason in any of the world's great cities— say Washington, for 
Instance— where parties are not only of nightly occurrence, but often 
four or five of them are given the same evening, and at most if not 
all of them one is expected to show oneself at least. This thought 
hashes through my mind when I hear some of our society lights 
complain of being "so tired, actually worn out," if more than one 
ball takes place within a fortnight; while three parties a week are 
voted to be " something too dreadful, and such excessive dissipation 
really not to be encouraged." 

It must be admitted that our German residents understand the art 
of thoroughly enjoying themselves, as witness the annual New Year's 
reception of the San Francisco Verein, held at their rooms last Sat- 
urday evening, which was another of the many brilliant entertain- 
ments for which that club is famed. The decorations were at once 
handsome and elaborate, and the guests, though probably not so nu- 
merous as on other occasions, had no lack of amusement provided 
for them, they entering most heartily into the pleasures of the hour. 
Dancing came first in order, to which, as an adjunct, was a grand 
Christmas tree laden with gifts, occupying the place of honor in the 
ballroom. The midnight hour found them all seated at a bountifully 
spread supper table, at which an hour or more was spent. Then 
came the distribution of gifts by lottery, after which there was more 
dancing, and the affair did not come to an end until it was almost 
time forbreakfast. 

Two events are on the tapis which promise well for future enjoy- 
ment. One will be the fancy dress ball which the Olympic Club an- 
nounce for the 8th of February, and as it is to be strictly confined to 
the members and their lady friends, great will be the pressure brought 
to bear upon said members for invitations, especially as it is to be a 
masquerade as well, which to some fair creatures makes it all the 
more charming. It goes without saying that the Olympics will strain 
every nerve to sustain their well-earned reputation of being capital 
hosts and givers of delightful entertainments. 

The other will be the Mardi Gras ball of the Art Association, which 
the directors have decided shall this year be given at the Grand 
Opera House. Their ball of last year at the Art Association's Rooms, 
Which is still fresh in our memories, was successful beyond their 
wildest anticipations, and everything possible will be done to eclipse 
it and to render the forthcoming one perfect in even the smallest de- 
tail. The various committees are already appointed, and a glance at 
the names is sufficient assurance that every idea will be well carried 
out, and the ball prove one of the greatest successes of the Winter 
season. Many ladies are, indeed, so enthusiastic on the subject, they 
are not allowing any time to be lost in their preparations, but are al- 
ready deep in the mysteries of getting up costumes that will be at 
once both novel and handsome. 

Among dinners on the tapis is one to be given by Mrs. Sam Wilson 
in honor of Mrs. Stuart, nee Mamie Elam, the bride of New Year's 
Eve, and all her young friends are hoping that it will conclude with 
a dance. 

There was some talk during the Autumn of a number of theatrical 
entertainments that were likely to take place this Winter, but as yet 
the idea has not been acted upon. However, Mrs. Goad announces 
one for Tuesday evening of next week at her residence on Washing- 
ton street, when Esmeralda will be the play presented, Mrs. James 
Kobinson, Miss Ella Goad, Mr. Hugh Tevis and other distinguished 
amateurs taking part in it. 

Mrs. Fred. Sharon did not go East last Saturday as was at first her 
intention, and in place of the ball in her honor, which her mother, 
Mrs. Tevis, had in contemplation on her arrival, she invited a large 
number of her friends for last Tuesday night, her usual " home even- 
ing," which assumed the proportions of a dancing reception, with 
one of Mrs. Tevis' well-known delicious suppers to wind up with. 
Mrs. Sharon will probably remain here a week or ten days longer. 

The weekly Wednesday evening dances at the Occidental Hotel 
still continue to be given, much to the gratification of the large num- 
ber of guests who seldom miss one of them, and they are always 
very pleasant gatherings. 



i Ipera parties Rppenr tQ I"' less in favor this Winter than for a num- 
ber of years. A few have, however, been given to hear the Carleton 
Company, with the usual addenda of supper afterwards, 

Mis. 5|, a. Burn* and Hiss Burns will leave shortly for Europe. 

The lirst series "i Professor Rose weld's musical afternoons oLosed 
most satisfactorily yesterday, when the programme of music ren- 
dered consisted almost entirely of compositions of local talent* and 
the audience was a large and fashionable one. These concerts have 

become a necessity, and (he first one of the second scries will be given 

on the afternoon of the L8th, at Irving Hall. 

The Boston Quintette Clftb, which conies with a clean bill of inn ttcal 
health from the " Hub," and which is said to be one of the best or- 
ganizations of the kind in the United Slates, will give two concerts 
next- week, Tuesday and Friday, at the Metropolitan Temple. The 
people comprising the club are: John F. Rhodes, solo violinist; Paul 
Mende, violinist ; < 'scar ilt nlschel, flute virtuoso and violinist; Paul 
Stoeving, violin and viola soloist; Louis Blunienburg, violoncello 
virtuoso, and Anna Carpenter, prima donna soprano. 

Samuel W. Backus', who has been absent from the city for the past 
two years, has returned, and on the 7th occupied his new residence 
on the northwestcorner of Howard and Twentieth streets. Felix. 




To the Relief of Khartoum. 




i^im0 y 



W. B. CHAPMAN, 

123 California St., San Fra rttoGi 

SOLE AGENT FOR THE PACIFIC COA3 ? 

For sale by all first-class Wine- Merchant 
and Grocers. 



SAN FRANCISCO aYEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 12, 1889. 



WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH PLACERV1LLE ? 

At a time 'when California is soliciting the good opinion of Eastern 
people, a heavy blow has been struck at the State's good name which 
is hard to bear. The Syracuse, N. Y.. Standard meets our carload of 
exhibits and tells ns that whilst the products of our soil are all right, 
our products of men, manners, law and justice are all wrong, and 
that our Stale, however blest by Nature, is not a fit place for people 
who do not want to be robbed to live in. It undertakes to give proof 
of what it alleges, and cites certain proceedings at Placerville as evi- 
dence that we are a lawless, debt-repudiating and rascally people. 
We have no knowledge of the circumstances to which it alludes, but 
it is proper to say that they are given with specifications of detail as 
to call for a full and fair rejoinder. The authorities of El Dorado 
county must see to this forthwith. They owe it to themselves and 
the State that this libel shall be answered. Whilst it is traveling 
around among Eastern exchanges it is doing a very great deal more 
harm than our carload of exhibits can possibly do good. We make 
no doubt that the story told is very greatly exaggerated, and that it 
is possible to truthfully put a very different complexion upon it, and 
that is just what the people of Placerville will have to do forthwith, 
or the building up of the northern part of the State will be retarded. 
No one will care to settle in a region where it is believed an honest 
debt cannot be collected. Our Board of Trade and Chamber of Com- 
merce should see to this matter. The following is the Standard 
article alluded to : 

" They are making great efforts in California to induce emigration 
to that State. Tluy have an exhibition of the products of the State 
running around the balance of the United States upon wheels— a sort 
of railroad traveling show. California may have, and no doubt has, a 
tine climate and agricultural and horticultural capacity. But theseare 
small considerations when balanced against the law-breaking spirit 
rampant there; the sacredness of contracts in that State is not held in 
high regard. There is a place called Placerville in the County of El 
Dorado. California, an organized city, having a Mayor, Councilmen, 
etc. Placerville had occasion to issue its bonds to raise money to 
construct a railroad in which the city was deeply interested, and 
which is now operated to its benefit. These bonds' were put upon the 
market, and, like other securities of the kind, were circulated and 
sold to innocent purchasers. Some of them came into the hands of 
a highly esteemed citizen of Syracuse, and that gentleman has, for 
many years, been endeavoring to force their payment. No defense 
is even pretended to exist against them on the part of the city, and 
the courts have decided that they must be paid, but the law in Cali- 
fornia is in such a weak and unsatisfactory condition that it has 
proven insufficient in this case for the purposes of justice. In order 
to avoid a mandamus the Mayor and the" Councilmen resigned, and 
all for a time took to the woods to avoid paying an acknowledged 
debt. So it happens that no one can to-day be found who can be 
compelled to levy a tax for the payment of the bonds. All the offi- 
cials are refugees from justice, and public sentiment in the city and 
county approves their conduct. Among the other marvels of Cali- 
fornia, perhaps there is none so striking as that of an organized gov- 
ernment outlawed and running away like a thief from the officers of 
the law. Respectable people, who like the security of the law and 
believe in the sacredness of contracts, will hardly care to go in that 
direction, ami will liberally discountthe representations of the agents 
of the Far West when they recommend California, and especially 
Placerville. in El Dorado County, as a place for the investment of 

capital. " . ___ 

A WORSE THAN USELESS DISCUSSION. 

The present discussion anent the annexation of Canada is worse 
; than useless; it is positively hurtful. It worries and annoys the 
Canadians, whilst it deludes a vast number of our own people with a 
mistaken idea. It is idle to disguise or attempt to deny the fact that 
there is an overwhelming public sentiment in the Dominion against 
annexation in any form. So long as that exists it is irritating folly 
to attempt to force a discussion, in Congress or elsewhere, of projects 
to accomplish the impossible. If annexation is ever to take place — 
able men in Canada believe it inevitable, though not for some years 
yet — the Canadians will practically have to annex themselves. If 
they ever retell a condition of mind favorable to union, they will ask 
to be admitted, and it will then be for us to consider whether their 
admission would be an advantage to this country or not. There are 
able thinkers who are not as clear on that point as they would like to 
be. The Canadian States would have a way of voting of their own 
that would b* much more likely to be agreeable to our present South- 
ern States lhati to those of the North. With the political equilibrium 
so evenly balanced in this country as at present. Canada would hold 
the balance of power between the two great parties and practically 
rule our country. That might or might not be advantageous, but it 
is a consideration that demands much more serious thought than is 
being given to it by the shallow and ill-informed daily press of the 
period. The true attitude to be assumed in this country is that of 
the coy maiden who is willing to be wooed but unwilling to anticipate 
the wooer and answer him in advance. The immediate business we 
have on hand with Canada is to settle the fisheries dispute. This 
ever-recurring controversy will never be permanently settled until 
our fishermen are allowed freedom to fish in Canadian waters, and 
can enjoy the unrestricted hospitality of Canadian ports. But we 
can hardly expert something for nothing. For these privileges we 
must, of course, give equivalents^ such as admitting Dominion fish, 
coal and lumber free of duty. In other words, there must be a 
limited reciprocity treaty. The freedom and hospitality we ask we 
must he ready to concede. As for the rest, Canada should be left to 
her own devices. 



SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT 

OF 

The Nevada Bank of San Francisco, 

JANUARY I, 1889. 

ASSETS. 

Heal Estate $ 424.171 49 

Miscellaneous Bouds and Stocks 1,326,197 43 

County Warrants 21, r> 19 00 

Loans on Keal Estate. 227.097 49 

Loaus on Stocks, Bonds and Warrants. 543J963 71 

Loans on other Securities, Grain, etc 561,025 7S 

Loaus on Personal Security 1,283,432 65 

Mouey on hand. 873,549 64 

Due from Bauks and Bankers 694.St6 77 

Other Assets 4J034 42 

TotalAssets $5, 949,898 39 

£1 ABILITIES. 

Capital Paid Up $3,000,000 00 

Due Depositors 2,138,633 32 

Due Banks aud Bankers 753,353 57 

Profit aud Loss Account 57^911 49 

Total Liabilities $5,949,S98 38 



State of California, ) 

City aud Couuty of San Fraucisco, ( 

We do solemnly swear that we have (and each of us has) a personal 
knowledge of the matters contained iu the foregoing report and that 
every allegation, statement, matter and thing therein contained' is true to 
the best of our knowledge aud belief. 

J. F. BIGEbOW, Vice-Presideut. 
D. B. DAVIDSON, Cashier. 

Subscribed aud sworu to before me, this 8th day of January 1889 
[Seal J j. h. BLOOD, Notary Public. 

I,IVT OF STOCKHOLDERS. 

Name. ^a. Shares Held. 

Job n W. Mackay i$ ooo 

James G. Fair. '"" lOOOO 

James L. Flood 9500 

J. F. Bigelow """ 250 

E.A.Davis -. 250 

[Jan. 12.1 

STATEMENT 

OF 

The Bank of California. 

San Francisco, 1st January, 1889. 

ASSETS. 

Bank Premises $ 250,000 00 

.Real Estate, taken for debt 499,390 *>2 

Miscellaneous Stocks, Bonds, etc 1,023,872 *5 

Loaus ou Keal Estate 705^462 6S 

Loans on Stocks, Bonds aud Warrauts 1,737,381 71 

Loaus on other Securities 670,7y8 02 

Loaus ou Personal Securities 5,709|419 99 

Due from Bauks aud Bankers 2,094[, r >^7 06 

Money ou hand .. . l,96<U6y S4 

Other Assets 32,829 03 

t l4.60I.921 40 

LIABILITIES. 

Capital Paid in Coin $ 3,000,000 00 

Reserve Fund 1,000,000 00 

Due Depositors 7.521,774 59 

Profit aud Loss Account 1,702,011 29 

Due Bauks and Baukers 1,347)861 52 

Dividend-! Uupaid ... ' 5^274 00 

Other Liabilities 25,000 00 

$14,601,921 40 

State of California, City aud County of Sao. Fraucisco, ss.— William Al- 

vord, President, and Thomas Brown, Cashier, of the Bank of California, 

being each and severally duly sworn, each for himself deposes and says, 

that the foregoing statement is true, to the best of his knowledge and belief. 

WrLLlAM ALVOKD, 
THO. BROWN. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 9th day of January, 16b9. 
LSeal.] JAMES MASON, Notary Public. 

STATEMENT 

OF 

The Bank of California 

Of the Amount of Capital Actually Paid into said Corporation. 

CAPITAL STOCK, fully Paid in U. 8. Gold Coin t3,000,000. 

State of ( aliforu'a, City aud Couotyof Sau Fraucisco, ss.— William Al- 
vord, President, and Thomas Browa, Cashier, of the Bank of California, 
beiug each and severally duly sworu, each for himself deposes aud says, 
that the foregoing statement is true, to the best of his knowledge aud belief. 

WILLIAM ALVORD. 
THO. BROWN. 
Subscribed aud sworn to before me this 9th day of Jauuary, 1889. 
[Seal.] [Jan. 12. J JAMES MASON, Notary Public. 



Jan. 12, ; 



SAN FKANCISCO NKWS LETTKR. 



SPARKS. 
rrn NKHTthocran for spending khe holidays out o! town, comes 
/ \ the whisper thai the perl ol the community who are always 
h~* ready to -erviiciy follow aoy fashion that oomea go us from 
jL X. London <>r New York were badly sold this year when they 
wen down to Honlerey in quasi ul CbriBtmae oheer aod ex- 
clusion froni the common herd. Tha oommon herd were there in a 
aottd phalanx. They took possession of the hostelry, paid their bills, 
end participated in all the good times tnal the fonr hundred hud 
fondly imagined would only be reserved tor their delectation. When 

the kaut ton returned to town the) had the felicity of reading in the 

da ly papers that they had incurred much needless expense and for- 
saken the comforts of home only to enjoy themselves in the society 
of Smith, Jones and Brown- the tailor, the baker, the candlestick- 
maker. Mortified vanity may teach a valuable lesson to the aris- 
tooracy of Ban Francisco, and serve to implant a little reason and 
oommon sense in their adle pates, which are certainly at present filled 
with as small a modicum of those qualities as is consistent with san- 
ity. In New York the fashion of leaviug town at this season was 
not a blind imitation of the English mode, but came about naturally 
through the desire for winter sports that could not be had in a large 
city. The holiday of the year was seized on as the best opportunity 
for enjoying skating, tobogganing and sleighing, and for entertaining 
large family parties in country houses, whose owners could afford to 
be hospitable in this princely style. For those who did not own 
country houses, or did not care for the trouble of opening them, 
Tuxedo offered a charming retreat that was so carefully managed 
that none but the elect could enter its sacred gates. 

» • * * « 

Bnt there is a distinction with a difference between an elegant pri- 
vate club-house, whose careful supervision is under the care of Mr. 
McAllister's generals, and a public hotel, where the credentials for ad- 
mission consist only in ability to foot the bills. The want of resem- 
blance between our enjoyment of the festal occasion and its observance 
in the East does not end here. The bucolic amusements, in whose pur- 
suit one is supposed to seek the country, are an impossibility in this 
climate, owing to the rain-soaked, moisture-exuding conditions of 
lawns and grounds. Out here, where we dwell in an atmosphere of 
eternal Spring, and where Winter sports are absolutely unknown, 
the fad of leaving the exclusion of home and rushing to a public tav- 
ern has neither rhyme nor reason, and only renders ridiculous those 
who ape foreign customs without judgment or intelligence. Goto! 
little San Francisco four hundred, and try and learn by experience, 
if you have no guide or head, to mix a little worldly wisdom with 
your pleasures before you plume yourself on versatility in adopting 
fashions of other climates and more refined conditions of life. 
■* * * » « 

My practiced vision forsees a hurricane on the social horizon that 
wilt engulf in its mad whirlwind several very respectable families, 
whose privacy will be invaded and peace of mind destroyed by the 
publicity of the divorce court. This unwelcome notoriety will be 
forced on them by a woman whose vagaries have long since passed 
the bounds of decency and modesty, for whom no excuse can be 
found, and who sins openly, wantonly, cruelly, apparently for the 
pure love of vice. The daughter of wealthy parents, she married a 
short time since into a respectable family, and her husband is a nice 
fellow, and a very good husband as husbands go. He is not dissi- 
pated, is kind, attentive, supports his wife in good style, and when 
the press of business prevents him from escorting his wife to places of 
amusement, his handsome brother stands always ready to take his 
place. All the incentives to a happy, peaceful life surround the 
bleached blond in question, whose name I suppress out of regard for 
her family. Bother love of excitement, or some inherent taint in 
the blood, has induced her to commit follies that can scarcely be 
winked at or covered with charity's veil. When a woman so far for- 
gets the outward conventionalities as to frequent French restaurants 
of an afternoon, and there meet Tom, Dick or Harry, and in their 
convivial companionship inbibe a skinful of champagne, her malady 
has reached a cri&is that demands prompt and heroic treatment. 
* * # - * * 

How this woman obtained an entre! into that fold of the Good 
Shepherd known as the cotillion parties, is a mystery shrouded in 
blackest gloom ; it is generally supposed that access to the Kingdom 
of Heaven is about as easy as to gain admittance to that circle where 
any eccentricities of conduct are regarded as Cain's abhorred mark. 
Nevertheless, this person is frequently there, though her character 
must be known to half the men on the floor, and is permitted to 
mingle with young girls, who at home are carefully guarded from 
even the knowledge of sin. En jiassant, it is a wonder she cares to 
attend festivities from which her cker ami is excluded ; he does not 
adorn society at present, owing to an unfortunate little speculation at 
cards, in which he was detected before he became exactly a million- 
aire. In the past he was addicted to roping his brother bohemians into 
friendly games of poker with professional gamblers, with whom he 
divided the unlawful gains. Since the disgraceful scandal his means 
of subsistance have been somewhat precarious, but evidently he 
procures the needful in some way, as he deluges the lady above 
alluded to with flowers and bon-bons, dinners and -petit soupers, and 
pays all the. attentions demanded by the most extravagant whims. 
In the approaching divorce suit be can console himself in his misery 



by knowing that he will not be the only co-respondent, as there will 
probably be as manj as In the celebrated CoHn-CauipbelJ case across 
the water. 

• *»•«* 

The ballet at the ' i rand I q»ra House was honored one evening lai t 
week by the presence of four good men and true, noted Uim-vioa/nU 
and cultivated connoisseurs in wine, women and music. The quar- 
tette consisted of Mr. Joseph Redding, Mr. Hurry Qllltg, Mr. Alec 
Hamilton and Captain Sohenok, U. S. N, They occupied a stage 
box, and though on pleasure bent, there was evidently some con- 
certed and serious ohject in view. One band of GOryphfas after an- 
other marched or danced into view without eliciting attention, but 
finally came she of the strawberry and olive abbreviations, who gaily 
performs on the trapeze. Then the four leveled their lorgnettes in 
her direction and evinced so much agitation that the audience were 
no longer in doubt as to the proper person to applaud in the list of 
artists. Bravos, plaudits, murmured exclamations and whispered 
consultations as to the reality of the charms displayed were wafted to 
the ears of those who sat in the vicinity, and the joy over the some- 
what antiquated performer was so sincere that in the words of Mr. 
Pepys, It did pleasure me much. It is a rare thing these days to find 
the unsophisticated heart of a little child under the hardened exterior 
of a man of the world, and I am not yet cynical enough to be un- 
moved by the spectacle. Of course no base or ulterior motive could 
be suspected in connection with the admiration of these gentlemen. 
There were four of them and they left with the audience. My confi- 
dence in their integrity was too great to harbor the unworthy sus- 
picion that any one of them returned to the stage entrance after- 
wards. 

It is quite likely that before the rich man died and was buried, he 
had plenty of friends who were only too happy to feast at his table, 
and to make free with his brandy and cigars. Dives may give a party 
every night, and all the beau monde will be there, for such is the way 
of tbe world. There is always a craze to know the dispensers of 
hospitality, and he, or she, who can spread the festive board will 
never lack for guests. 

* # * # # 

But here in our city of San Francisco, there is a case exactly the 
reverse. That notorious woman of wealth, who, like the asp, carries 
the poison under her tongue, who has earned for herself the signifi- 
cant title of " the ogre of the hotels," who now bids fair to be the 
feminine impersonation of the Wandering Jew among the caravan- 
series of a great city, she, at least, has had a different experience. 
Although she can entertain with lavish hand, there is no struggle to 
gain her acquaintance or to be among her bidden guests. One Mon- 
day, at the Palace, her parlor was full of callers. " 1 1 is my turn to 
go next," said a bright little woman to the colossal monument of 
brazen effrontery and vituperation, " will you promise me that when 
I am out of the way that you won't dissect me as yon have done 
every one who has left this room?" " Oh, you needu't worry," re- 
plied the whilom belle of St. Louis, "you can trust me." So the 
'ady departed, leaving tbe others amazed at her temerity. As soon 
as the door had closed upon her caller, the madame said, " Well, I've 
promised, and I never break my word, bui," with a look that said un- 
utterable things. " I could tell a good deal." 




rJ&EnflfllW 1 



Pacific Coast Agents : 

Sherwood & Sherwood, 

212-214 Market Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. [Dec. 8. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 12, 1889. 



THE AFTERNOON TEA. 
\ j /HE afternoon tea is an established institution of society, and 
LJ is regarded with opposite feelings by the members of the 
fashionable world. Men consider it a bore. Those women 
who are miserable unless surrounded by a coterie of gentle- 
men, who find it unutterably dull to be condemned to con- 
verse ouly with their own sex, are not apt to care much for the 
afternoon tea, for that is a form of entertainment which, as a rule, 
gentlemen in San Francisco do not frequent. For others— those, for 
instance, who do enjoy the society of women, and for that large pro- 
portion who live for dress and its display — the afternoon tea has de- 
cided attractions, especially for the latter, since it is an acknowledged 
fact that women cress for the admiration or the envy of women. 
Few men, except they be society reporters or dry goods clerks, are 
able to analyze what constitutes the toilet of the lady who may have 
charmed their masculine eye, and the most that many of them are 
able to say is that "she had on something light, " or " she wore a 
beautiful silk." As for describing it, that is out of the question. 
But a woman takes it all in at a glance, and an afternoon tea gives 
all the feminine portion of one's acquaintance an excellent opportu- 
nity for such observation. 

Among not a few the afternoon tea is regarded in the light of an 
undesirable innovation; and rightly so, when it is made an excuse 
for a ball in the afternoon, or when a lady becomes economical in her 
entertainment and introduces her daughter in an afternoon tea. It 
is claimed that it has ruined the small evening party which was so 
pleasant a feature of the past, and it goes far to making dinners and 
balls less common. At least, so says an eminent authority upon 
social usages in America. 

But the afternoon tea is not without its advantages. There are 
those social sponges who absorb invitations to dinners, suppers, thea- 
ter parties — in brief, to all form of social entertainment, with never a 
return of hospitality. To such, ignoring all obligations, all things are 
welcome. But. among a great number, there is a desire to make 
some return. The greatest obstacle to the successful carrying out of 
any such intention is the emulative spirit, strong in every feminine 
breast. Even in the unworldly church social, experience has demon 
strated the fact that, if it be held at all, it must be held in the church 
parlors, and with refreshments jointly contributed. For when the 

church attempted to hold the social at the house of Sister A or 

of Brother B, and let Sister A or Brother B provide the re- 
freshments, each tried to cast all previous efforts into the shade, 
finally making it impossible for a poorer, though perhaps more pious 
person, to carry on the series, simply because the regulation "sup- 
per " had grown so beyond the original idea. The subject of refresh- 
ments—of feeding people — has, at least so declared a writer on social 
subjects some years since, assumed such colossal proportions, that 
soon only the very rich will be able to entertain at all. Those of 
humbler means and less efficient service will not be able to gratify 
their social instincts, deterred chieny by the difficulty of feeding so 
many people. If to this gastronomic difficulty there be added the 
often insuperable one of scant space, it is easy to see why a large 
proportion of society hailed the afternoon tea as a solution of the 
trouble. 

An evening party presupposes the guests all to be at the house of 
their entertainer at the same time, to dance, or to go to supper in a 
body; while the tea, boon to people with small rooms, appoints a 
time, from three to six, or from four to seven, it may be, at any mo- 
ment of which the guests may arrive, take refreshment, or depart. 
Thus, a great crowd and pressure may be avoided, for, though the 
apartments may experience a temporary pack, the shifting nature of 
the entertainment soon rescues it from all dangers of a crush. 

As to the exact nature of an afternoon tea, it must be described by 
the statement that there are at least three styles of entertainment so 
called, and not always appropriately. To quote from a recent writer 
upon the subject, " The large and ceremonious tea of fifty or a hun- 
dred guests, where professional, vocal and instrumental music is en- 
gaged, should be called a reception, and if a lady gives but one, it is 
perhaps proper to make a call afterwards, although in New York 
cards are simply left upon the hall table, and the whole business done 
up for a year." 

" Then comes the ceremonious tea, when a lady receives four or five 
afternoons in a winter, and the five o'clock tea, as in England, when 
a lady is at home every afternoon at five, receives in a tea-gown, and 
the whole affair is considered wholly unceremonious." 

" Invitations, however, are issued to all those entertainments on 
the ordinary visiting card. Call it what you will— reception, kettle- 
drum, afternoon tea, or something without a name, we have gained 
an easy and sensible entertainment in society from four to seven 
o'clock, which is nearly perfect.'' On arriving at a tea, the invited 
guests, without inquiring if the hostess is at home, leave a heavy 
wrap in the hall, place a card upon the hall table, and at once enter 
the house. At a large tea, the hostess will receive her guests at the 
drawing-room door, shaking hands with each, but at smaller teas, 
the hostess may have the drawing-room door closed and receive her 
guests, while she remains seated at her tea-table. In New York it is 
not considered proper to introduce two ladies who live in the same 
city, but the rule is not so imperative that a hostess may not use htr 
own judgment in the matter. Nor is it necessary to take leave of the 
hostess; at a crowded tea it is proper to make a quiet and unnoticed 



exit, unless, of course, the hostess be standing near the door, or she 
be a new acquaintance, and the visit a first call. 

As to refreshments, at the large ceremonious teas a long table in 
the dining-room is used, at smaller affairs the hostess or her young 
ladies will be seated at a small table upon which are arranged a silver 
waiter, and tea-kettle heated by an alcohol lamp, the tea caddy, sugar 
and cream, and thin slices of bread and butter. Fancy cakes and 
biscuits, thin bread and butter, rarely fruits or ices are served at an 
afternoon tea ; sometimes sandwiches of pate defoie gras. Instead of 
serving the refreshments in the dining-room, they may be passed 
around by neat servants. Very often the tea is taken standing, the 
whole idea of the afternoon tea being an informal gathering. Its 
primary idea is to dispense with formal etiquette and to save time. 
A lady or gentleman who chooses to accept this form of entertain- 
ment has made his or her call ; another is not required. 

" I regard the afternoon tea," said a social leader in San Francisco, 
" as a sort of social clearing-house. The hostess pays her calls by in- 
viting her friends to call upon her at her afternoon tea, and they are 
not bound to call again upon her after the tea, their social obligations 
being discharged ; but if they choose to call they are at liberty to do 
so, and the lady may again cancel her obligations to call upon them 
in return by inviting them to another tea." Di Vernon. 

S. F. News Letter will be seutweeklyto anyaddress in the United States 
for $1.25 for 3 months, $2.50 for 6 mouths, or $5 for 12 months. The subscrip- 
tion for the Continent, Great Britain and the Colonies is: 3 months, $1.50; 
(i months, ?3; 12 months, $6. All subscriptions are payable in advance, and 
cheeks and P. O. O.'s should be made payable to Publisher S. F. News 
Letter, Flood Building, Market street, S. F." 

KID AND FABRIC GLOVES, 



SIX SPECIAL BARGAINS. 



From an unusually large and well appointed stock, we have select ed as 
! special nducemeuts a few Hues, and marked them at sucb^prices as are 
pronounced by our customers to be 

EXTRA GOOD VALUE. 

AT 25c, LAMES' 6BUTTON LENGTH, JERSEY CASHMERE GLOVES 
AT 75c, LADIES' 4-BUTTON, SUEDE, EMBROIDERED BACKS. ~J 

AT 85c, LADIES' 4-BUTTON FRENCH KID, EMBROIDERED BACKS. 



AT 85c, LADIES' 4-BUTTON "FR ANCOZ" DOGSKIN, embroidered backs. 
AT $1.00 LADIES' 6-BUTTON "FRANCOZ" DOGSKIN, embroidered JJbacks 



AT $1.75, GENTS' 2-BUTTON "REYNIER" KID GLOVES, embroidere backs. 



Packages delivered, free, in Oakland, Alameda and Berkeley. 




111. 113. 11B, 117, 119, 121 POST STREET. 



OCCIDENTAL. HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 



LOCATED 



.a. (jt:iet 
centrally 

FORTHOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION. 
April 7 ,! WM. B. HOOPER, Manager 



CUNNINGHAM CURTISS, & WELCH 



WHOLESALE STATIONERS AND BOOKSELLERS, 

327, 329, 331 SANS0ME STREET. 
[Teb.19.1 



Jan. 12, 1880. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




n~n YELLOW garter worn around the left leg is supposed to ex- 

/ \ ercta ft peculiar charm and bring fair fortune to the wearer. 

JtTa But woe to the unwary maid who puicliascth a pair! The 

JL Jl Spell will not work unless the other dimpled knee is held in 

an elastic embrace of contrasting color, and motley is the 

order of the garter. Yellow for the left leg. of course, and black, 

usually, for the right; irnot black, cardinal or blue, or anything you 

please. 

• • * * * 

Out upon the Russian bang— the sharp, defiant, trying little point 
to which capricious Fashion has too long been faithful ! The Fauntle- 
rov coiffure, pur et simple for very young girls, and modified to suit 
older faces, is having an exclusive triumph in New York, where 
everything is more or less Fauntleroyesque just at present. The 
soft, loosely curled bang is Incoming to nearly every woman this side 
of the sere and yellow stage, and belongs to the big hats and wide- 
poke bonnets, which are steadily growing wider and pokier everyday 

and hour. 

* * » * * 

Black, white, gray and tan are the only shades seen in gloves this 
season, and undressed kid is as popular as ever before. But the pos- 
s bilities covered by " gray " and " tan " are infinite. The former 
means anything from London-smoke, reed-green, tempest-blues, 
stone or Maltese to the daintiest and the faintest of ash and pearl, 
while any change rung on the fundamental brown will pass muster 
as tan. The ungloved man has gone out entirely. Pearl kids have 
again resumed their sway for evening wear and masculine fingers 
are encased in the conventional tan for the street. 

# * * * # 

'Tis again the age of sweet smells! Not only are satin corsets 
padded with perfumed sachets, chiffonier drawers therewith lined, 
triple extracts preferred for mouchoirs and eaux de Violette and Ver- 
veine used in milady's bath, but even sofa pillows, chair cushions and 
the long bolsters for beds, are deftly interlined with a heavily per- 
fumed layer of cotton batting. Of course the truly chic woman affects 
one perfume and identifies its fragrance with her belongings. She 
uses, let us say, Violette de Parme, the most delicate and subtle of 
odors. She drops her mouchoir or her dainty gants de SuMe, and the 
finder, instead of going about making inquiries, simply takes a com- 
prehensive little sniff— recognizes the Violette, and returns milady's 
property forthwith. 

The boa has coiled its sinuous and snaky length about the throat 
of every woman in Paris, London, New "York and San Francisco. 
Be it feathers, flowers or fur, it matters little; but a boa it must be. 
Fur for the street, feathers for the carriage and the theater, flowers 
for the ballroom, and the boa forever! A Gotham suitor, with a heart 
full of affection and a pocket full of shekels, poured out the contents 
of both at the feet— or, rather, around the neck— of his lady-love in 
the shape of a boa made entirely of natural violets, over three yards 
and a half in length; and this, mark you well, on Christmas Eve, 
when tiny corsage bouquets of violets were selling at Shorley's for 
three dollars apiece. It is said that the fashion for boas was started 
in tbe following manner: A certain rich woman of Paris discovered 
them in an obscure shop, where the owner bad purchased them from 
a party of sailors. She immediately bought them, ten in number, 
and gave away nine to various friends on condition that they all 
appeared in them at the opera the same evening, and so started a 
new fashion in a single night. The lady kept a beautiful snow-white 
one, which so pleased her that she afterward ordered bands enough 
to match to trim an entire court gown of white velvet. These boas 
are exceedingly becoming, and are kept on, and not thrown aside 
with the opera cloak, as with the low corsage they are designed to 
protect the throat from slight draughts of air. 

* * * « * 

Pure golden-yellow is a favorite color in the gorgeous and expen- 
sive brocade brought out this season. "Dawn," an exquisite shade 
of rose glimmering with gold, is another popular ground for the love- 
ly Marguerites, roses, and other small flowers, while the Pompadour 
brocades, with the same backgrounds, show garlands of flowers, white 
and silver roses of natural size, and moss roses and leaves, trailing 
v nes in glittering green and gold tinsel, and pommegranate and lo- 
b lia sprays in heavy embossed weaves or a surface of thickly repped 
taille Francaise. Magnolia and japonica are the newest shades in 
c "earn white, and the new reds are called Veronese, Sultane, Mephis o 
and English cherry. Green is still fashionable, but there are no con- 
spicuous new shades this season with the one exception of "reed- 
green," a pallid, grayish tint seen only in water rushes. 

******* 

It is no louger considered elegant in Paris and London to engrave 



note paper with an armorial crest, a handsome monogram or averj a 
simple initial having superseded a enjoin which, according to the 
noblesse, has been profaned by the ambitious oobodlee with 
money enough to buy that unto which they wen- not born. Madame 
la Marquise, or Her Graee the Duchess, therefore proudly removes 
from the vulgar gaze of her Correspondents and places over her 
aristocratic beai t the insignia of her noble birth, and the crest is now 
embroidered on the left breast of dainty chemises and night robesa 
la Josephine. , 

* * * # « 

A women in these days of independence and originality can wear a 
costume with a hit borrowed from this epoch and that century, and 
withal be well dressed as regards the toilet entire. For instance, a 
laughing young society belle last week declared that she at thai mo- 
ment was attired in a very English walking jacket with French round 
hat. Her coat had a Louis XIV. waistcoat and a deep Russian collar 
of sealskin. Upon her hands were tan gloves of Danish kid, and car- 
ried an Alaska-seal muff. There was a border of Venetian embroidery 
on her camel's-hair gown, of dark Roman red, and over her arm, for 
the wedding journey she was about to take, was an Irish peasant's 
cloak, made of rough Scotch tweed. 



MORE BRIDLE PATHS. 

The "News Letter" wishes to thank the Park Commissioners 
for the attention shown to its suggestions in the past in making a 
bridle path, but would beg to make another suggestion. What is 
wanted is not a bridle path that goes winding around through unfre- 
quented spots in the Park, but one that hugs the main road, and is, 
to some extent, part and parcel of it. To be what is wanted, it should 
begin at the entrance of the Park and run along thus to the Lodge, 
after which it should commence again on the north side of the Park, 
about where the water-trough is, and run along on the left hand side 
of the road again to the cut in Strawberry Hill, from which it is hut 
a short distance to the speed track, which will be in a condition to 
accommodate equestrians as well as teams. The advantage of this 
sort of bridle path will be that those who ride here will thus be able 
to see and be seen, which, it is safe to say, is the main object of going 
to the Park. The bridle path is really as much of a necessity as the 
track for teams, as, owing to our climate, the afternoons of even the 
warmest Summer days are apt to be windy and raw enough to make 
buggy or carriage riding too cold for comfort; whereas, one can keep 
warm very easily on horseback. As it is at present, if one rides on 
horseback in the present roads, he finds them too hard, both for his 
own comfort and his horse's good condition. Bridle paths, with soft 
roadways, are absolutely demanded. 



-OTTIR,- 



GREAT ANNUAL CLEARANCE SALE! 



We begin the New Year with a Clearance Sale that eclipses all previous 
sales iu the great variety aad desirability of the goods displayed and the 
SWEEPING KEDUCTIONS FROM REGULAR VALUES at which they are 
offered. This cut embraces EVERY ARTICLE IN OUR MAMMOTH 
STOCK, and no person should failto visit our stores and examine the goods 
and prices during the sale. 



Extraordinary Reductions 

IN 

Ladies' Cloaks, Wraps and Jackets, Silks, Vel- 
vets, Black Dress Goods, Colored Dress 
Goods, Laees, Ribbons, Gloves, Hosiery, 
Underwear, Gents' Furnishings, 
House Furnishings, etc. 




MARKET AND JONES STREETS, 

SAN FRANCISCO. TJao. 5. 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 12, 1889. 



THE 



"d' 



HISTORY OF KISSES AND KISSING. 
Give Me Kisses. 
fIVE me kisses! do not stay 
Courting in that careful way ; 
All the coin your lips shall print 
Never can exhaust the mint. 
Kiss me then, 
Every moment, and again! 
Give me kisses I nay, 'tis true, 
I am quite as rich as you; 
And for every kias I owe, 
I can pay you back, you know. 
Kiss me then, 

Every moment, and again!" —Victor Hugo, 

"Ah, Madame, as to its invention (kissing), it is certain that nature 
was its author, and it began with the first courtship." Such was the 
answer given to an inquisitive dame by the British Apollo, a paper 
published in the first decade of the last century. 

At what time kissing was invented no one seems to know. Tra- 
dition tells us that it was introduced into England by Rowena, the 
pretty daughter of Hengist; but the kiss has been known since the 
days of the patriarch Isaac, and it is singular that the first kiss re- 
corded was a treacherous kiss— that of Jacob. 

Treacherous kisses are numerous. On the pretense of a kiss Joab 
stabbed Amasa to the heart; Judas betrayed his master with a kiss, 
and modern instances are plentiful of such like kisses. More 's the 

English-speaking peoples have become renowned in history as 
kissers. Erasmus, a celebrated scholar, yet grave and serious, was 
carried away with enthusiasm at the custom in England. He writes : 
" If you go to any place you are received with a kiss by all. If you 
depart on a journey you are dismissed with a kiss. Do they meet 
you anywhere, kisses in abundance. Wherever you move there is 
nothing but kisses, and how soft, how fragrant they are! On my 
honor, you would not wish to reside here ten years only, but for 
life ! " 

In England, customs which were once very popular are now no 
more. Indiscriminate kissing at dances, at festivals and village 
gatherings are now unheard of, yet in the 17th and 18th centuries 
there was no lack of them. 

In Russia and other oriental countries, kissing at festivals found 
place. In our own times, the Freuch Canadians still retain the cus- 
tom of kissing every one they encounter on New Year's Day ; such, 
however, will soon cease to be. 

The curious custom of kissing the Pope's foot originated from one 
of the Leos having a mutilated hand, and was too vain to ex- 
pose it. 

The kiss is everywhere recognized among lovers, and officially so 
by many political and religious organizations. 

There is a limit, however. Penalties of great severity are imposed 
in some parts for " stealing a kiss." 

In Finland and Iceland it is considered the deepest insult to kiss 
any one, even a husband or wife; illegal kissing being severely dealt 
with. 

There have been some famous kisses given at times, either for the 
appreciation of genius or to secure some desired end. 

Petruchio kissed his bride in church " with such a clamorous 
smack that at the parting all the church echoed." 

When Charles Fox was contesting Westminster in a hard-fought 
election, the Duchess of Devonshire helped his canvass by bribing 
voters with kisses. A butcher, named Steele, acquired immortality 
in this campaign by voting for Fox and kissing the Duchess. 

Lady Gordon, beautiful and wise, after the Scottish soldiers had 
been reduced in numbers at Salamanca, recruited fresh ones by 
placing the tempting shilling between her still more tempting lips, 
whence those who chose might touch them with their own. 

Queen Margaret of France, in the presence of her court, kissed the 
homeliest man in her kingdom, Alain Chartier, whom she found 
sleeping. " I do not," said she, turning to her surprised followers, 
" kiss the man, but the mouth that has uttered so many charming 
things." Chartier was a poet. 

The young and beautiful Duchesse de Villars was ordered by the 
enthusiastic spectators to kiss Voltaire, who sat in the stage box wit- 
nessing one of his plays— Merojpe. She kissed him, too. 

Gilbert Stuart, the painter, was once met by a lady on the streets 
of Boston, and told him that she had just seen his picture and kissed 
it, because it was so much like him. 

"And did it kiss you in return ? " asked Mr. Stuart. 

11 Why, no," returned the surprised dame. 

"Then it was not like me," said the painter, revealing his wit. 

Everybody is familiar with the incident of Dominie Brown and his 
sweetheart Janet, who courted seven years before they had their first 
kiss, and asked a blessing and returned thanks for the performance 
and successful termination of the affair. 

It may not be out of place to mention here that there is a tradition 
to the effect that Hannah More was never kissed in her life. Can 
any other woman claim that proud position ? 

Other historical kisses, though of a different kind, are those of Mr. 
Bumble on the " chaste nose " of Mrs. Corney ; of Sam Weller's epi- 
sode in the cellar looking for his hat with the pretty housemaid, and 



stealing a kiss from her rosy cheeks; and of the unkissed kiss which 
Ben Jonson demanded of Celia: 

" Drink to me only with thine eyes, 
And I will pledge with mine, 
Or leave a kiss but in the cup, 
And I'll not look for wine." 

" Rare " Ben was of such an amorous nature that 
" He was wishing 
He might die a-kissing." 

Ben, bad he been married, might have emulated the Texan who 
kept account of the number of kisses exchanged with his wife since 
their union. This model husband counted 36,500 the first year, or 100 
a day; 9,125 the second year, 3,050 the third year, 365 the fourth year, 
2 the fifth year, and then he ceased counting. 

In the " Beggar's Opera," Macbeth kisses Jenny Diver, and the 
sarcastic remark it brought forth may be in the minds of many a 
sorrowing yet silent spouse: " One may know by your kiss that the 
gin is excellent." 

Kissing in religious ceremonies is still prevalent. The Moham- 
medan pilgrims to Mecca kiss the sacred black stone, and each of the 
four corners of the Kaaba. 

In the Romish church the priest religiously kisses the aspergilium, 
and the palm on Palm Sunday. 

In the Church of England it was customary for the clergyman to 
kiss the bride after the marriage ceremony ; but this thing no modern 
girl would tolerate. 

The stage kiss assumes such fantastic shapes that there is no telling 
to what high development the art may attain. The " Langtry kiss" 
was the latest, and there is little doubt but it will be improved upon. 

To the man who is about to resort to this pleasing art, we would 
say, take time, do it neatly, and don't get confused; to the maiden 
in a like predicament, we ask to remember that the lover who is all 
kisses will not be the husband to get up in the morning to light the 
fire, or to walk about the room in the "dark hours " of the night, 
soothing the crying baby. b. b. 

San Francisco, January 12, 1889. 

Sister Amy (aged 13)— Who is in the parlor? Sister Lu— Young 
Mr. Smith. I think he has been drinking too much; he emptied our 
decanter of sherry. Sister Amy— Oh, goody gracious ! and I left my 
big French doll all alone in the parlor. (Runs to rescue it.) 

— Town Topics. 

" What a difference in the complexion of those two sisters, Emma aud 
Lydia— the first so fresh, the other so sallow!" " Not at all. Emma uses 
Madame Rachel's Bloom of Youth; Lydia does not." 

BA3sr^:s. 

THE GERMAN SAVIN6S AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 California Street, San Francisco. 

CAPITAL. $800,000. 

Officers— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President, FRED. ROEDING ; Cash- 
ier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT; Assistaut Cashier, \VM. HERRMANN. Board of 
Directors— L. Gottig, Fred. Roediug, Chas. Meiuecke, Edw. Kruse, George H. 
Eggers, N. Van Bergen, Igu. Steinhart, O- Schoemauu. Secretary, Geo. 
Toubny. Attorneys, Jarboe, Harrison aud Goodfellow. [Dec. 1. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

822 PINE STREET. 
PAID-UP CAPITAL \ $1,000,000. 

DIRECTORS i 
CHA8. F. CROCKER, | E. H. MILLER, Jr. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH President. 

W.E.BROWN.. Vice-President. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashier. 

[Oct. 23. J 



SECURITY SAVIN6S BANK. 

Guarantee Capital $300,000 

OFFICERS: 

President JEROME LINCOLN | Secretary 8. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-President W. 8. JONES I Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. Aue. 22. 



THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Sansome and Pine Streets. 



LONDON OFFICE— 3 Angel Court. 
NEW YORK CORRESPONDENT— J. W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL STOCK, $6,000,000. 
Will receive deposits, open accounts, make collections, buy and sell 
exchange and bullion, loan money and issue letters of credit available 
throughout the world. FRED. F. LOW, j M « n „.„ 

ION. STEINHART, I Man agers. 
P. N. Lilienthal. Cashier. fMarch 26. 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

No. 18 Geary Street, San Francisco. 



Incorporated.. . 
ADOLPH C. WEBER. 



.November 24, 1869. 

. President. | ERNST BRAND Secretary. 

LOANS AT LOW RA TES. [Bee. 29. 



Jan. 12, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'.> 



SELECTED SONG. 



BEETHOVEN S THIRD SYMPHONY. 

Passion ami pain, the ontorj "i despair, 
rhfl pang »>f unattainable desire, 
And youth's delight in pleUOres that expire. 
An«l swirt btgh dreaming* ol the good and fair 

Clashing in swift Boul-atonn t Ihroogh which no prayer 
Uplifted stays the destined death-stroke dire. 
Then through a intghtj sorrowing, as through fire, 
The soul burnt pure yearns forth into the air 

Of the dear earth, and. with the scent of flowers 
And song of birds assuaged, takes heart again. 
Made cheerier with this drinking of God's wine, 

And turns with healing to the world of men. 
And high above a sweet strong angel towers, 
And LOY6 makes life triumphant and divine. 

—Scribna's. 



EXPERIENCE. 
The world was made when a man was born. 
He must taste for himself the forbidden springs, 
He can never take warning from old-fashioned things, 
He must light as a boy, he must drink as a youth. 
He must kiss, he must love, he must swear to the truth 
Of the friend Of bis soul; he must laugh to scorn 
The hints of deceit in a woman's eyes 
That are clear as tbe wells of Paradise. 

And as he goes on till tbe world grows old, 
Till his tongue has grown cautious, his heart has grown cold; 
Till the smile leaves bis mouth and the ring leaves his laugh, 
And he shirks the bright headache you ask him to quaff. 
He grows formal with men and with women polite, 
And distrustful of both when they're out of his sight. 
Then he eats for his palate and drinks for his head, 
And loves for his pleasure, and 'tis time he were dead. 

— John Boyle O'Reilly. 



LOOKING SEAWARD IN DECEMBER. 

Bleak lies the landscape. 'Thwart this ice-clutched pane 
I see stark beech trees gird in eyry chain; 

The roadway coiling snakewise towards the West, 
Where smouldering fires of sunset still do stain 

The gloom-assaulted, cloud-strewn heaven's breast. 

And turning Eastward, what a space of sea 
Outspreads— a limitless immensity! 

Hiding beneath the hollow, vaulted waves. 
So ghastly treasures of its savagery, 

O'er which, in brutish greed, it gloating raves. 

Listen! The wind protests in sullen monotone, 
Yet not monotonous, for now its moan 

Weaves varied, subtle changes— a strange chant 
Of sound chromatic; whilst the bass notes drone 

Forth the relentless burden of their taunt. 

— William Struthers. 



A WINTER GARDEN. 

All through the winter on her window-sill 

I see a little garden smile and bloom, 

As though a waif of summer in the room 
Finds refuge there, safe from the bitter chill; 
The sunbeams love to linger there and fill 

The blossom-urns with delicate perfume; 

There, for a space, the sun forgets the gloom 
Of barren field and snow-enshrowded hill. 

And she who tends it has a gracious mien, 
Her hair is white as is the moonlit snow — 
A feeble woman, like the year, grown old. 
Ab, this is Winter, in whose heart the green 
Of springtime and the blossom's ruddy glow 

Sleep warmly ! Age wherein youth grows not cold ! 
— American Magazine. 



A REGRET. 

Oh, could we but have seen, while they were ours, 

The grace of days forever passed away; 
Had we but felt tbe beauty of tbe flowers 

That bloomed for us — before they knew decay; 
Could we have known how we should yearn in vain 

For looks and smiles no more to greet our sight, 
Or how tbe fruitless tears would fall like rain 

For hours of sweet communion, vanished quite; 
Their worth to us— had we but better known, 
Then had we held them dearer, while our own, 
Had kept some salvage from the joys o'erthrown, 
And loneliness itself had found us less alone! 

— Century. 



BAHKirBRITISH COLUMBIA. 

lucorporatod by Royal Charter. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $2,500,000 

RESERVE FUND 500,000 

Southeast corner California and Sansome Streets. 

Head Office— 28 CORNHILL, London. 

Branches— Portland, 0.; Victoria, British Columbia. 

Sub-Branches— Now Westminster. Vancouver. Nanalmo and Kamloops British 
Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business, Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, ami Special Deposits received. Commercial Ci > 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounts! and n-i 
ranees made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rateH 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows- 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bauk of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank 
of Mexico and South America; CHINA and JAPAN— Chartered Bauk of 
India, Australia aud China; AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bauk of 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottish and 
Australian Chartered Bank and National Bank of Australasia; DEMEKARA 
and TRINIDAD (West Iudles)-Colouial Bank. [March 21 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO, 

Capital $3,000,000 

WM. ALVORD, President. 
Thomas Brown. Cashier | B. Murray, Jr .. .Assistant Cashier 

AGENT8: 

NEW YORK— Agency of the Bank of California; BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bank; CHICAGO— Union National Bauk; ST. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Saving Bank ; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent 
in London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sous. Correspondeuts in India, 
China, Japan and Australia. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the 
principal Mining Districts aud Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland, Oi, Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Frankfort-ou-the-Mam, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Syduey, Auckland, Hongkong, 
Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italv and Switzerland. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

1 ESTABLISHED IN 1870.J 
UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY. 

CAPITAL STOCK PAID UP $1,500,000 

SURPLUS. $300,000 

UNDIVIDED PROFITS 152,974— 462,974 

DIRECTORS: 

8. G. Murphy, James Moffitt, D. Callaghan, Geo. A. Low, James M. Donahue, 

James l). Phelan, N. Van Bergen, Jas. H. Jennings, J. A. Hooper. 

President S. G. MURPHY | Cashier E.D.MORGAN 

Vice-President .JAMES MOFFITT | Ass't Cashier . . . GEO. W. KLINE 
Transacts ageneral banking business. Issues Commercial aud Travelers' 
Credits. Buys aud Sells Exchange on Loudon, Dubliu, Paris, the principal 
cities of Germauyand the United States. Collections made and prompt 
returns rendered at market rates of exchange. [Sept. 8. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 [ Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $250,000. 

Head Office 9 and 10, Tokenhouse Yard, Lothbury, Loudon 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris aud American Bank 
(Ltd.), 46 Exchange Place. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Preres &Cie, 17 Boulevard 
Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Commercial 
and Travelers' Credits issued. DAVID CAHN, j Mnnfl(rArs 

EUGENE MEYER, j Mana & ers - 
C. Altschul, Cashier. [March 26. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

Agency at New York 62 Wall Streel 

Agency at Virginia, Nevada. 

London Bankers Union Bank of London (Limited i 

DIRECTORS: 

JAMES G. FAIR. JA3. L. FLOOD, JNO. W. MACKAY 

A. E. DAVIS, JOHN F. BIGELOW. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 

Capital and Reserve, $2,375,000. 

San Francisco Office, 424 California St. I London Office 22 Old Broad St. 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, William Steel. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking aud Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. June 9. 

WELLS, FARGO & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $4,694,8Ci.C4 

DIRECTORS: 
Lloyd Tevis, President : Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford Chas. Crocker, J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris, Geo. E. Gray 
and C. F. Crocker. H. Wadsworth, Cashier. 

Receive Deposits, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Ban king 
Business. I Au S- 6 - 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 12, 1889. 




ff \ I /HE Queen's Lace Handkerchief" was put on last Monday 
I- — ( night for the second attraction of the Carleton Opera 
^ ^ Company, and, though not as new, it yet made more of a 
__ success. The opera is even more of a " lightweight," in 
many respects, than Mynheer Jan, though here and there 
a spurt of melody towers up like a geyser above the symmetrical 
level of the other, thus lifting it higher as a whole. But, even with this 
feature, Mr. Carleton was not satisfied with his legitimate opportu- 
nities in the way of music, and interpolated the " Tureador " song 
from Carmen at the beginning of the third act, which calls for merely 
a mild reproof, since it did not seem particularly forced, any more 
than any interpolation is forced somewhat. He sang the song toler- 
ably, and on Monday reeeived an enthusiastic recall. 

***** 
Mr. Carleton's Cervantes is graceful and shapely, and, of course, 
his singing is good, though as far as local color, histrionically or 
geographically, is concerned, he was simply Mynheer Jan returning 
the visit of Don Diego, one might say, and straying over into the 
" pony " kingdom of Portugal on a lark. Much the same may be 
said of the other people of the cast, also; as far as that goes, the 
effect of this lack being hightened by the local allusions to to-day's 
affairs and to-day's slang introduced here and there, which was re- 
ferred to last week. 

***** 

The entire first act of the opera drags badly, the fun attempted 
failing of its effect to a great extent, simply because it is ill-directed 
buffoonery, without any special aim either of its own or along which 
to travel. Between Charles H. Drew as Hans, in Mynheer Jan, and 
as Sancho Panza in this opera, the distance is as great as between in- 
telligent wit and idiotic drivel. 

» * * * * 

During the second act the interest begins to increase, and by the 
time sparkling Clara Lane appears at the head of her troops in the 
mountain pass it is lively enough, and she carries that scene with 
graceful nerve, while her voice sparkles in consonance with her mo- 
bile face and brilliant eyes. 

***** 

Alice Vincent as the Queen had no more chance than last week, 
but improves her opportunities better, and makes a much more 
favorable impression; while Jay C. Taylor's King is just effeminate 
and negative enough in spots to make it fit the character to a nicety, 
and Clara Wisdom as the Marchioness and J. K. Murray as the Pre- 
mier do their parts well, 

* * * * * 

Alfred Cellier's opera of Dorothy will be given on Monday, Tuesday 
and "Wednesday of next week, the Mikado on Thursday and Satur- 
day evenings, and Nanon on Friday and at Saturday's matinee. 
***##* 

Mazulm continues to good business at the Grand Opera House, be- 
ing given with all the wealth of coloring and action for which the 
Kiralfys are famous; but The Black Crook will replace it next week, 
and be given with great magnificence and grandeur. 

* * * * * * 

A Noble Rogue is still drawing well at the Alcazar, but The Golden 
Giant will be staged again next Monday for a brief run. 

***** 

" Standing room only " has been the rule for several nights at the 
Tivoli, with A Night in Vejiice; but next week Martha will be given, 
with Campobello in his great impersonation of Plunkett. 

***** 

Modjeska will appear at the Baldwin January 28th, beginning a 
series of Shakespearian and other plays by a gorgeous revival of 
Cymbeline, in which she will have the support of a competent com- 
pany, at the head of which will be E. H. Vanderfelt. from the prin- 
cipal London theaters, whom she brought to America as her leading 
man three seasons ago, but who left her forces to be leading man at 
the Boston Museum, and has since been in other companies. He is 
a most accomplished actor, and this will be his first appearance 

here. 

******* 

Frank Daniels, having been accused of singing " Razzle-Dazzle " 
without authority, when it belongs to the play of A Brass Monkey, 
writes a letter to the New York Mirror, in which he says: "The 
claim that the above songs were appropriated from A Brass Monkey 
is ridiculous. If the question is asked, can Messrs. Hoyt and 
Thomas show what prior right they have to the first-named song, 
" Razzle-Dazzle?" when I have the original pen copy in my posses- 
sion, presented me by the composer, Willard T. Barton, Esq., of the 
Bohemian Club, San Francisco. Hoyt and Thomas' company are 
only able to sing the chorus, the verses of which they do not know, 



while my company sing the entire and original song. The question 
now arises, How did Hoyt and Thomas become acquainted with even 
the chorus if the song has not been published? It is said that Mr. 
Hoyt accepted an invitation from members of the Bohemian Club in 
'Frisco last season, and, while accepting their hospitality, purloined 
the chorus of the song, which was sung at the time by the com- 
poser." This is getting to be very interesting. 

* ***** 

Dunlop's Stage News says: " John A. Mackay is not satisfied with 
the last act of the new play Len. Grover has written for him, and has 
refused to go out with it unless altered." It is to be hoped that some 
one will alter Mr. Mackay at once, so he can start out before his sea- 
son is over. 

***** 

The following is from the New York Mirror: " Valerie Hickethier, 
a young lady of Oakland, Cal., whom Edwin Booth describes as 
" very talented," will probably go on the stage next year. She is tall 
and slender and very ambitious. Joaquin Miller, the poet, speaks of 
her blonde hair as being ' entangled with the sun.' " 

***** 

We are likely to have a cold, backward Spring. Mary Anderson 
will come to San Francisco in April. As though Mary herself were 
not icy enough. She will appear in .4 Winters Tale. But we must 
warm her up with a little of our glorious climate. 

***** 

The Kitty, which met its fate in San Francisco, where a Bush-street 
audience wanted Courtwright to sing " Flewy-Flewy," and let his 
kitty business go, is trying to mew feebly in the East; but the gen- 
eral verdict is " Scat ! " and boot-jacks. 

***** 

Nicolini is said to object to the " too perfectly passionate way " in 
which Patti and De Renske sing the love duets in Romeo and Julietta 
at the Paris Grand Opera House. Let*s see. How many years is it 
since the Marquis di Caux objected to the way in which Patti and 
Nicolini sang love duets in another opera? What is sauce for the 
goose should be sauce for the gander. 

***** 

M. Planquette, the composer of The Bells of Corueville and various 

other well-known comic operas, has been in London for some weeks 

engaged in putting the finishing touches to his new work, Paid Jones, 

previous to its being put in active rehearsal. This will be produced 

at the Prince of Wales's to-night. 

***** 

The " Louise Pyk " subscription concerts, under the management 
of Mr. W. B. Newson, will be a great success. All the leading society 
folks in town are supporting the undertaking, and two rich musical 
evenings may be looked forward to. 

***** 

The success of Mr. Rosewald's orchestral matinees induces him to 
announce a second series, to begin January 25th. These matinees 
are well calculated to please the public, and deserve the success they 
have attained. 

McAlester & Jones, Real Estate Agents and Rent Collectors : Office 
422 Montgomery street. The best regulated office in the city. Men of experi. 
euce, having studied the wants of landlords and tenants for 28 years; reli- 
able, prompt and responsible in the management of real estate, renting, 
selling and collecting, and taking full charee of property at lowest rates. 

NEW BALDWIN THEATRE. 

Handsomest Theatre in America. Absolutely Safe. 
Lessee and Proprietor, Mr. Al. Ha yuan | Acting Manager, Alfred Bouvier 
During the Carleton Peason a diffarent opera will be presented each 
week. Every Eve iug Ibis Week and Saturday Matinee, the Brilliantly 
Successful CARLETON OPERA COMPANY, in a Superb Revival of the 
Great Success, The 

Regular Prices— 2'c, 50c, 75c, $1, $1.50. Matinees— $1, 75e, 50c, 25c. 

Monday Next, third Week— Brilliant Repertory. Monday, Tuesday and 
Wednesday Eveniims, "DOROTHY!" Thnr-day aud Saturday Evenings, 
" MIKADO! " Friday Evening and Saturday Matinee, "NANON." 

Seats for nest week now ready. [Jan. 12. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE. 

Mr. Al. Hayman Lessee and Manager 

Positively Last Nights. Last Matiuee Saturday. Over 12,000 children 
have witness the PauLomime. IMRE KIRALFY'S Gigantic Production, 

The Ongar Sisters, the Dare Brothers, Bibb aud Bobb, the Beautiful Ballets. 
Remember: Last "Mazulm " Matinee Saturday. 

Prices— 25c, 50c. 75c, $1. No higher. 

Special— Monday Next, January 14th— IMRE KIRALFY'S 
BLACK CBOOKI 
Presented on a scale of magnificence and grandeur that will eclipse all 
former productions of this successful play in Han Francisco. 

Seats for " Black Crook " now ready. [Jan. 12. 

ALCAZAR THEATRE. 

Geo. Wallenrod Sole Manager 

This Evening, Third aud Last Week of 

.A. USTOZBIiZE ZROa-TTZE. 
Characters by Geo. Osbourue, L. R. Stockwell and the Alcazar Theatre Com- 
pany. 

Evening Prices— 25, 50 and 75c. 

Monday, January 14th— 



THIS GrOZLiJDZEILsr C3-I^_XsTT. 



fJau. 12. 



.tan. 12, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTER. 



11 




KHK lone »gonj Is "v.T. After montha and montba "f gory 
challenges, aoul-inapiring oefls to battle, and bantering and 
blaakguardiog, Sullivan and Kllratn bave :it last signed to 
right for the cbampionsbip ol the world. An. I now lor the 
next -i\ m. .mils we an- to read column after column about 
these worthies, telling how they will light and where they will fight 
and how long thev will light, and, of coarse, every little preliminary 
will he magnified into an event of national importance. Already we 
are beginning to hear that Kilrain. who is, perhaps, the windiest 
pugilist of the deeade. is dissatisfied with the articles. The natural 
inquiry is. why Kilrain did not look after his own interests person- 
allv if 'he had imr intention of lighting. As matters stand, the pair 
will come together on July s,|, within 100 miles of New Orleans. 
London prize-ring rules will govern this contest, and the men will 
light with bare knuckles. The referee must be chosen at the side of 
the ring, and the vietor will be awarded the stakes of $10,000 a side. 
the Police OattUe diamond belt and the championship of the world. 
Furthermore the winner will have to defend the title against all 
comers— white, black, yellow or what not. It isn't a matter of any 
difficulty to say who will win this battle. Sullivan has been so seri- 
ously ill that his representatives had to insist on six months' lapse of 
time between the signing of the articles and the day of the mill. If 
in that time he recovers his old-time strength, activity and hitting 
power, he will win wilhout the least trouble, for Sullivan, in his 
prime, eouhl handle Kilrain as a boy. If, on the other hand, he does 
not recruit, the issue is in doubt. While Kilrain has never fought 
anybody of any consequence, he is not a bad fighter by any means, 
and if the big man is not at his best, the " champion-by-bluff" still 
has a chance of winning. 

This much settled, it is out of the question to expect that Kilrain 
will pay any further attention to Jackson and the California Athletic 

i Club. Kilrain and Charley Mitchell, his right-hand man, are entirely 
too long-headed to think of encountering any sort of set-back before 
the main battle with Sullivan, if it ever comes off. It may be argued 
that as Jackson and Kilrain would meet under the Marquis of 
Queensberrv rules in case they meet at all, a defeat for Kilrain would 
not mean much, inasmuch as the world's championship is decided by 
the London rules, which permit a certain amount of wrestling. That 

: is all bosh. If Jackson can do anything with Kilrain under the 
Queensberry rules he can all Out slaughter him under the London 
rules. Jackson is perhaps as clever as any man in the world to take 

i an advantage at wrestling, and no one knows this better than Mr. 

' Jake Kilrain and his double, Charley Mitchell. President Ful.la and 
the Club have virtually abandoned the project exactly as they have 

] abandoned the proposed Warren-Weir match. It is in order now for 
Jackson to give McAuliffe another chance. McAuliffe has the money 
behind him and has issued a challenge, which up to date Jackson has 

■ not noticed. There is much quiet talk going on up at the Club with 
a view of bringing the men together again, and a purse will no doubt 

■ be offered shortly. Jackson may as well remember first as last that 
McAuliffe is as good a man as Cardiff, Lannon, Killen or any of that 
class, and it is useless to talk of importing any of them to go down 

before him. 

* » * * » 

The speck of war at the Bay District track between Manager Hinch- 
man and the bookmakers has not been patched over. The bookies 
are defiant as ever, and are out for a fight if they have to make one. 
It would be as well if several gentlemen interested in turf matters 
would go in and back Hinchman up to any extent and down this 
coterie first as last. They are a tough crowd of citizens, and they 
have needed suppression so long, oh, so long! There will be races 
at the track this afternoon. Four fine running events are on the 
card, enough, in all conscience, to bring out a respectably sized crowd 
and liven up the gloom around the auction-pool box. 

* * * * » 
William O'Connor, the oarsman, has written to a friend in this city 

that he and Gaudaur will not row in this city prior to his departure 
for the Colonies. This letter was received on Wednesday, and it may 
be regarded as a tacit admission that the two were going to row a 
cooked race for the gate money. When O'Connor was here last 
Spring he made a splendid impression on account of his apparent 
squareness, but be may as well learn that it will not pay him to hip- 
podrome for any gate money, or with any man. When he is going 
to row a race, let him row for all he is worth ; when he is going to 
give an exhibition, let him say so. It was hippodroming in connec- 
tion with other crooked work which made the name of Teemer a by- 
word, and O'Connor having defeated that man, let him take warning. 
His challenge to Searle is made in good faith, and on his trip to the 
Colonies he will have the good-will of every decent sportsman in San 

Francisco. 

* * * * * 

The Golden Gate Athletic Club has had all it wants of fighting for 

a good, long time. The battle between Mahan and Mulholland last 



Wednesday Dight, which was extended until nearly daylight on 

Thursday, was in many respects as ta as oould be Imagined. 

Mulholland is the better, end Malum, to all appearances, has the 
most grit; but, then, they were s.. evenly matched that they fought 
eighty-seven r.um.ls without decisive result. There has been some 

talk to the effect that the mill was not a genuine contest,and both 
men are apparently perfectly satisfied. Each fought the other to a 
standstill, ami then neither had the strength left to deliver a knock- 
out blow. At least, this is the most charitable view that can he taken 
of the case. The decision was about as fair as could have been made 
under the circumstances. George Mulholland would do well to learn 
something about, the American art of knocking a man out, and 
Mahan should learn to be quicker. Now that this battle is over, in- 
terest is centered in the Carroll- Blakelock contest of the 26th, which 
promises to be the best lightweight light of the year. 

» » * • • • 

The hunters are growling over the poor hunting. The ducks seem 
to have departed for parts unknown or inaccessible to the average 
every-day city sport. The marshes around the city are practically 
deserted. At some distance in the country there is still good shoot- 
ing, but the localities are so remote as not to have any particular 
attraction to San Franciscans. 



Mokauhan's, California Market, is the place to get the best oysters to be 
had, either Native or Eastern. Telephone: 1329. 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Kreling Bros Sole Proprietors and Managers 

Third and Last Week. The Greatest Success of the Season. Standing 

Room Only. 

J± H^TIO-ZEIT IlsT "VIEICTICIE I 

A delightful operetta, by Johauu Strauss. Crowded, Enthusiastic Audiences 

Every Night. Beautiful Venice Illuiuiuated ! The Doves of San Marc— 

Introducing M'lle Garetta, with her flock of Wonderfully Trained Pigeons. 

Magnificent Scenery, Costumes aud Appoiutments. 'iraud Chorus and 

Orchestra. 
Next Week- li/LJ^ttrCttJ^. 

OUR POPULAR PRICES— 25c and 50c. [Jan. 12. 

MILLS COLLEGE AND SEMINARY. 

The term commenced January 9, 1889. The College Course corresponds 
very nearly to that of Wellesley College, Mass. 
Take Oakland boat and Niles traius to Seminary Park station. 
For circulars or information apply to 

REV. C. STRATTON, D.D., 
Or MRS. C. T. MILLS, 
Jan. 5.] Mills Seminary P. O., Alameda County, Cal. 

SCHOOL OF DESIGN. 

This school opened on MONDAY, January 7th. Tuition in Drawing 
Class, Antique and Portrait, $24 per term; tuition iii Painting Class, $30 per 
term: Saturday Class for Public School pupils and others able to attend 
Saturdays ouly, $4 per mouth; Life Class, Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays 
aud Fridays. For further particulars apply at the school, 430 Pine street. 

Jan. 5. J J. R. MARTIN, Secretary. 



PERR1ER-J0UET & Cie. 



OHZ^-^LT^.O-lsrE!. 



We have just received direct from France, per steamer via New Orleans, 
our drat shipment of this justly celebrated Wine, which we now offer for 
sale to the Trade at the lowest market rates. 

RESERVE CUVEE, 



Finest Extra Quality; 

Extra Dry, 
Pale Dry, 



I PINTS AND QUARTS. 



do 



do 



July 21.1 



BLUM, BALDWIN & GIRVIN, 

Importers, 

307 California Street, S. F. 



ARMAND CAILLEAU, 

Leading Cloak and Suit House 

OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

48 GEARY STREET, - _^_ - Corner Grant Avenue. 

Mr. Cailleau is now exhibiting the finest of European goods and of the 
latest patterns, selected by himself while abroad. 

ULSTERS, WRAPS, JACKETS, 

TEA GOWNS, ETC. 
SEALETTE BY THE YARD, THE CHEAPEST IN THE CITY. 
- Special care given to country customers. [ 8 «P 4 - 29 - 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 12, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCANS IN NEW YORK. 

New York, December 27, 1888. 
\ | j HE few Californians who are living in JSew York managed to see 
\__| something of each other during the holidays. Christmas 
^^ meant fur them not only the great season of general good 
_, L will, but also a good will with a special intention, which was 
In make each other as happy as possible. And tbe day was 
so bright and warm it was almost possible to convince one's self that 
one lived under Californian rather than Eastern skies. Down at the 
pretty town of Huntington. Long Island, Mr. and Mrs. Jennings Cox 
gave a dinner to Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Wattles; Mr. Wilder Pease gave 
a Christmas-eve dinner to some bachelor friends; Mrs. Atberton gave 
a small dinner party on Christmas day ; Mrs. Lounsberry entertained 
those of the family connection who are in New York, while Mr. and 
Mrs. Arthur Goodman gave on Christmas eve a dinner which will 
long be remembered by tbe happy participants. The circle of friends 
was distinctly Californian, and Mrs. Goodman showed her tact and 
judgment in bringing thoroughly congenial people together. The 
atmosphere was artistic and literary— Mr. and Mrs. Clay Greene. 
Mrs. Atherton, Mr. Kauffman, Mr. Fred Somers, Mr. Henry Alex- 
ander, and little Miss Gladys Goodman. Each guest was requested 
to bring a joke, which is a capital idea for starting vivacious conver- 
sation. The decorations of the table were in vivid scarlet. A bed of 
scarlet berries adorned the centre. The corsage bouquet were bunches 
of hollv ; the cards, which were paintings of humorous subjects, were 
fastened' on bands of scarlet satin, and the hostess, to carry out the 
line of color, wore scarlet berries in her dress and in her hair. In 
the evening each guest received a pretty souvenir from tbe gaily 
lighted tree, in many of which Mr. Goodman's artistic skill was mani- 
fest. Two of these gifts— his two first etchings— were presented to 
Mrs. Greene and Mr. Somers. There was something humorous in 
Mr. Somers's gift to the host. It has been something of a trial to this 
gentleman to enter spiritedly into the conversation upon California, 
which have prevailed at his board, as he has never visited the Golden 
West with rare sympathy. Mr. Somers presented him, therefore, 
with a book upon California, with which Mr. Goodman maintained, 
during the entire evening, a brilliant conversation upon the West. 
There°is probably in New York no more charming Californian home 
than Mrs. Goodman's. Sincere hospitality and clever society are a 
rare combination, but there they exist and flourish. 

Mrs. Atherton, whose new book, " Hermia Suydam," will appear 
in February, has been learning some of the quips and cranks of pub- 
lishing houses. When Belford, Clarke & Co. realized tbe success of 
'■ What Dreams May Come," they were eager for another book from 
her pen. " Hermia" being completed, was therefore sent to Belford 
confidently enough. But one certain Jones, a reader for the firm, 
found so much which appalled him in the perusal of this novel that it 
is said " his hair would have stood on end if he'd only had enough." 
So the head of the firm asserted that " Hermia " was the most im- 
moral book he had ever read. Belford, aghast, took the work under 
his own eye, and sent the authoress a note, begging her to alter some 
of tbe chapters. " 1 admit." he wrote, " the intensity and power of 
your book, and acknowledge that there is not a reprehensible or ob- 
jectionable scene in it, but its tendency is destructive of valued and 
revered institutions." Mrs. Atherton properly refused to change the 
theme or its development, whereupon Belford called a meeting of six 
wise men — Edgar Fawcett, I am told, was one of them — and submit- 
ted poor " Hermia " to them. They agreed with the reader, whom 
it bad first caused to tremble, and the six wise men of Gotham fris- 
soued together. Whereupon out spoke a bolder publisher. " If Bel- 
ford," said he, " rejects it for its immorality, I shall publish it for its 
great morality." and " Hermia " will therefore appear just the same. 
I am told Belford felt great regret at what he considered his only 
definite course. The book is a very deep and earnest study of will 
and heredity. Any one who takes it up with an idea of its belonging 
to the fleshly-erratic school of which Mrs. Rives-Chanler, Miss Dainty 
and Mrs. Ella Wheeler Wilcox are bright and shining ornaments will 
be disappointed. It is tragic in its intensity, and deals more with 
climax than detail. 

A rumor comes from London that Mr. William Hearst has pur- 
chased a London daily, and will make his future home in tbe world's 
center. IE he has, no doubt, Bigelow, who went over with him, will 
be made a conspicuous and important member of the staff. 

I hear that Harry Dam, who went over to London as correspond- 
ent of the New York Times, is gaining an admirable English reputa- 
tion in journalism. Julian Rue has entered the ranks of successful 
etchers. Mrs. Kate Griggin has published as a Christmas book the 
" Bird's Christmas Carol," and it has met witb such enthusiastic no- 
tices that it will no doubt make Californians ashamed that they did 
not appreciate it when it appeared in San Francisco as a donation 
for the Silver street Kindergarten. Congressman Felton, Barklie 
Hamilton and Morrow are among the recent frequenters of the Hoff- 
man. Lieutenant D. Lisle Tate, who will be pleasantly remembered 
at the Presidio, has been ordered to West Point for four years as as- 
sistant instructor in tactics. If " handsome Danny " creates such 
havoc here as he did in the West, the New York maidens will have 
to steel their hearts against him. " Jack " Chamberlin goes back to 
the Presidio. Lieutenant and Mrs. Hein are still traveling abroad, 
with an extended leave of six months. Ate. 

D.Albert Hii.ler.M. D. .1011S utter street, Saa Francisco, California. 



THE LAST CENTENNIAL. 
The closing one of the group of Revolutionary centennials will take 
place on the 30ib of April next, in New York— that of Washington's 
inauguration, for which great preparations are being made. The 
President and Cabinet and the Supreme Court in a body, with other 
officials, have been invited, and have indicated their intention to be 
present. Ward McAllister has been tor some months giving a great 
deal of thought to the work of the Entertainment Committee. Mr. 
Fish and Mr. McAllister are ably assisted by Vice-President Levi P. 
Morton, William Waldorf Astor, William K. Vanderbilt, Robert Gloe- 
let, William Jay, W. E. D. Stokes and representatives of the Beek- 
man, Winthrop, Morris, and other well-known families. The formal 
literary exercises will take place on the steps of the Sub-Treasury, 
corner Nassau and Wall streets at half past 10 o'clock. Reverend 
Richard S. Storrs, D. D.. L. L. I)., of Brooklyn, will offer the prayer. 
A poem is expected from the venerable Quaker poet. John Greenleaf 
Whittier. Chauncey M. Depew will deliver the oration. The Presi- 
dent of tbe United States will speak, and Archbishop Corrigan will 
pronounce the Benediction. At precisely 12 o'clock a salute of 21 
guns will be given to the American flag from ships of war of every 
nationality in New York harbor, and from the batteries of Castle 
William, and Forts Hamilton and Wads>vorth; then the grand Mili- 
tary Parade will pass the reviewing stand, at the corner of Wall and 
Nassau streets, where stood a hundred years ago old Federal Hall, 
the scene of the Inauguration ceremony. It is proposed to make the 
parade more brilliant than any parade ever held in the city. 

" No more dissipation, Map;, I've sworn off. No more cigars, no more 

cocktails, no more " "Oh, I'm so glad! Nothing but ice creams and 

cakes and " "Don't those go, too?" "No, indeed, especially when 

you ran get such nice ones as eau be found at tbe Original Swain's Bakery, 
218 Sutter street." " All right : it 's a go." 

ii<rf3TTja-A.]srcTi!. 




CAPITAL. 



Insurance Company 

....$1,000,000, I ASSETS 



D. J. STAPLES, President. 
ALPHEUS BULL, Vice-President. 



$2,250,000. 

I WILLIAM J. DUTTON, Secretary. 
I B. FAVMONVILLE, Ass't Secretary. 



Agents in all prominent localities throughout the United S tates. [Aug. 25. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

ORGANIZED 1864. 

Principal Office 276 Sansome Street 

FIRE INSURANCE. 
Capital Paid Up In U. S. Gold Coin $300,000.00 

Losses p'd since organi'n.?2,667,366.43 I Reinsurance Reserve - - .$ 230,330.3f> 
Assets January 1, 1888 .... 816,627.14 NetSurpIus(overev'ryth'g) 277,963.78 I 
Surplus for policy holders.. 808,294.14 | Income in 1887 354,683.66 

OFFICERS: 

J.F.HOUGHTON President I CHAS. R. STORY Secretary 

J. L. N. SHEPARD,. . .Vice-President I R. H. MAGILL General Agent 

Directors of the Home Mutual Insurance Co.— L. L. Baker, H. L. Dodge, 
J. L. N. Shepard John Curry, J. F. Houghton, John Sinclair, C. Waterhouse 
Chauncey Taylor, S. Huff, C. T. Ryland, A. K. P. Harmon. [March 3. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul aud smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain stored in Warehouses, 
insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class Companies, or Grain sold, if 
desired, at current rates. 

Office of the Company, 412 PINE ST., San Francisco, Cal. fNov. 19. 

AGGREGATE ASSETS, $46,000,000- 

London Assurance Corporation of London [Established by Royal 

Charter 1720.] 
Northern Assurance Company of London [Established 1836.] 
Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool [Established 1857.] 
Connecticut Fire Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 



ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 
S. E. Cor. California and Montgomery Streets. Safe Deposit Building. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Reserve Fund I'm addition to Capital) 2,126,000 

Total Assets July 1, 1887.. 5,809,629 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

July 16.] 306 California Street, San Francisco. 



Jan. 12, ! 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTKR. 



13 



PEKSJNALITIES. 
7 DWIN BOOTH i* v»*r> p tpular with bis oompany. He la R»- 
iu;ii in manner and gtveu to telling a good story, even vben 
"~~^> it i> at hi> own expense, and Uie other day related tin- follow* 

_ J log behind tbeeoanes: "1 Devar will forget one night in Chi- 

oagOi aboul tan yean ago," aald bo; "tha house was Tory 
ooHL i wits playing Sbylock. a iter my exit I went to my dressing room 
i«> wait until the and »»( th.- act. As usual my man came and told me 
i lie eu riai ii Ml down. I went on the stage and mulioned l<> the Stage 
manger to raise the curtain. He looked rather surprised but Obeyed, 

and I bowed my acknowledgment. Imagine what I felt when i learn- 
ed too lata that there hail been no applause; you eould have bought 
rue for a dollar. That ranieoi taking loo much for granted," he con- 
eluded with a laugh. 

Paris has harbored during the past week the ComteSSft de Pierre- 
fomls, who is no other than the Kmpress Kugrnie. She has walked 
alone and Unobserved lo the garden of the Tuilleries, where former- 
ly she reigned supreme, and she -piietly attended mass in the Cathe- 
dral of Notre Paine, where, as Mile, de Montijo, she was married to 
the Emperor of the French. Sad, with sunken cheeks, lustreless 
eyes and vacillating step, such are the changes which have come over 
the once beautiful woman who, at the last Court ball, before the un- 
happy "march to Berlin" was inaugurated, cried in exultant tones 
to the Princess de Metternich : " Remember, this is my war — not the 
Kmperor's." She now passes unnoticed where she was once the ob- 
served of all. While here she is residing with her niece, the Duchesse 
de Mouchy, nee Princesse Murat. 



Senator Ingalls' daughter has finally put her project of furnishing 
her father's library into execution. When the Senator's house burn- 
ed down a year or so ago his valuable library was completely destroy- 
ed, and it was a loss of no small consequence, for Mr. Ingall used the 
library continually. His daughter, who is a high spirited and intel- 
ligent girl , decided to make her father a library. To that end she be- 
gan literary work, and she has devoted all her energies to make good 
the loss occasioned by fire. She is a handsome, amiable and inde- 
i pendent young woman, and is meeting with success in newspaper 
work. Senator Ingalls is a poor man, despite his extended term of 
I office. It seems odd that a man occupying the place of virtual Vice 
[ President of the United States should receive no more than $8,000 a 
year from the Government. 

Miss Fanny Davenport is a victim of the autograph fiend. Last 
| week in Boston she made a test of the sincerity of one of these hunt- 
ers. A lady wrote her a feeling note, stating that she would consider 
I Miss Davenport's autograph invaluable. " Well, we'll see if she 
[ goes," said the actress, and taking out a carte devisite. she wrote 
j across the face of it, " Pass two. Fanny Davenport." " Now, there 
i is my autograph," said she, " and I will see whether this party con- 
; siders it of sufficient value to hold or to get into the theatre." It is 
; hardly necessary to state that the pass was found in the ticket box 
1 next evening, and Miss Davenport now places the value of her auto- 
graphs at about $3 each, which is what the two seats would have been 
! worth. 



Barrett, on the contrary, is active, very stern and a rigid disciplina- 
rian. One night as the young women waited to go on in The Merchant 
of Venice, a bunch of chrysanthemums in the hands of one of the 
court ladies caught bis eye. " Yoh will please throw those flowers 
away. And does that sash belong to the costume? I thought not. 
Kindly take it off. And you," to another, " will please leave that fan 
behind you." This was said with grave, dignified courtesy, which no 
oue dared disobey. Mr. Barrett has many friends, and his manner 
is genial and hearty when with them. 

The Czar is to have become reconciled to Prince Alexander of 
Battenberg, thanks to the kindly efforts of a motherly Grand Duchess 
who takes interest in the Princess Victoria of Prussia, and wants to 
see the young couple happy and married. If the report prove cor- 
rect, the amiable Grand Duchess will have achieved a great thing, for 
the Czar, who, according to the court chroniclers, has got it into his 
imperial head that Prince Alexander was a liar almost worthy to com- 
pare with Major Alexander Vaugh. 

Thirty odd years ago there was a poor drawing master near Frank- 
fort who rejoiced in the title of Schteswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glucks- 
burg, and in three pretty daughters. He was so poor that he could al • 
low the girls only $3 a month each pin money. But the girls " got 
there all the same," being now respectively Empress of Russia, 
Princess of Wales and Duchess of Cumberland. 



Count Von Moltke's house at Berlin is a very large one, with no 
less than thirty windows looking on the street. But the famous old 
General lives almost exclusively in two rooms of it. One is his bed- 
room, the other his study. The chief ornaments of the former are a 
large photograph of his wife and a picture of her tomb. These are 
always wreathed with palm leaves. 



THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

(ESTABLISH Kl) 1K71.) 
PIES .A-ICTD :M_A.K,i:fcT"E. 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up $400,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 218 AND 220 VANSOME STREET, 

San Francisco, California. 
GEORGE L. BRANDER, C1IAS. II. CUSHING, P. J. WHITE, 

President. Secretary. Vice-President. 

Board of Dirkctohs— D. Cullaghau, P. J. White, J. M. Donahue, GEO. 

L. Braudcr, E. L. Goldstein, L. Cuuuiugham, M. Kane, Fisher Amos, Dr. 

c. F. Buckley, I>r. Wm. Jones, G. II. whuatou, T. MoMullin, II. H. Watson, 

H. Dimoud, P. Bolaud. |Sept. 1. 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

.fx:r.:ej A.2&JD 3yc^.iax2srEi. 

CAPITAL, Paid In Full $ 200.000.00 

ASSETS. December 31. 1887 434,194.76 

LOSSES Paid Since Company was Organized 1 .846.704.24 

JOHN H. WISE, President. 
Chas. A. Laton, Secretary. 

Principal Office 439 California Street, 

(Safe Deposit Building). [March 10.] San Francisco, Cal. 

THE SOUTH BRITISH 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW ZEALAND. 

CAPITAL $1 0,000, u 

Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

Office— 213 and 215 Sansome Street San Francisco. 

A. S. MURRAY, Manager. 

London Office— No. 2 Royal Exchange Auenue, Cornhill, E. C. [March 6. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital 59,260.000 

Cash Assets 2,764,876 

Cash Assets In United States 1,398,646 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

GENERAL AGENTS, 
316 California Street, San Francisco. March20. 

AN6L0-NEVADA ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

FIRE AND MARINE.— Capital, Fully Paid, 92,000,000. 
OFFICE, 410 PINE STREET. 

BANKERS: THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

[Sept. 10.1 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL *5,000,000 

AGENTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

Nov. 18 ] No. 31 6 California Street, San Francisco. 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1782.] 
American Fire Insurance Co. of New York [Estab. 1857.] 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
July 16.1 473 California Street, San Francisco. 

_ THE EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY, 

Assets $84,378,905 

Surplus " $18,104,255 

This Society pays about five million dollars annually to the widows and 
orphans of deceased policy-holders. 

NORTH & SNOW, Managers for Pacific Coast, 

Oct. 27.] 405 Montgomery Street, S. F. 

THE SWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

SWITZERLAND of Zurich— Capital, 5,000,000 Francs. HELVETIA of St. 
Gall— Capital, 10,000,000 Francs. B ALOISE of Basle— Capital 5,000,000 Francs. 
These three companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that 
may be sustained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the 
world In the settlement of all claims under au English policy, these com- 
panies will strictly adhere to the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds 
and submit to English jurisdiction. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 410 California 
street, San Francisco. [June 9.] 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

CAPITAL $10,000,000. 

W. J. CALLINGHAM General Agent, 

420 California Street, i">s Francisco, Cal. [March 19 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 12, 1889. 



PENSIONING THE POLICE. 
The bill to pension some half-dozen of the old hands in the police 
department has again made its appearance at Sacramento. Its form 
has been slightly changed since last session, but it is the same old 
joker. Now, as then, it is one of the most cherished of the many bills 
the Boss has taken along in his gripsack. Its passage is the price he 
has agreed to pay for the voluntary retirement of the King pin mem- 
bers of the present police ring. If the bill goes through and becomes 
a law, certain officials are to step down and out, and Buckley through 
his Board of Supervisors is to control future police arrangements, and 
run pool-selling, gambling. Chinatown and other things to suit him- 
self and partner, the other Boss. That was the contract two years 
ago, and the reappearance of the bill is sufficient evidence that it is 
the contract now. Strange to say, it went through both houses then 
like greased lightning. Not a single voice was raised against it. 
Although it would have imposed a heavy burden or taxation upon 
San Francisco, not one of our dailies could beinduced to let the rate- 
payers know just what it did do, or to oppose its passage in any way. 
Fortunately we had at that time a Governor who understood the ras- 
cality of the measure and could not be hoodwinked into approving it. 
Governor Bartlett rebuked the wire-pullers who called upon him in 
regard to the subject; declared that San Francisco could safely be 
left to legislate in regard to police matters when she adopted a new 
charter, and persisted in pocketing the bill. It is said that Governor 
Waterman has been induced to see things in a very different light. 
It is claimed that somebody has promised the Governor's approval 
in advance. We do not credit the story. We know that Governor 
Waterman has from the first declined to reverse the policy of the late 
Governor Bartlett in regard to any matter upon which the deceased 
official was known to have entertained and expressed unmistakable 
convictions. In adopting that course the gentleman elected as 
Lieutenant-Governor displayed a degree of good sense and good taste 
that won for him that large measure of public sympathy and support 
which has ever since sustained him. Upon no subject was Governor 
Bartlett more clear and explicit than upon the necessity of allowing 
San Francisco to determine by charter what future obligations she 
would assume. Certainly there were no subjects in regard to which 
he was more entitled to be considered an almost infallible- guide than 
those which pertained to the government of this municipality. If 
Governor Waterman should make the passage of the Police Pension 
bill the occasion of reversing himself, he will, we are persuaded, live 
long enough to bitterly regret an actnotdemanded by public opinion 
or justified by sound public policy, but is the consummation of a 
wicked, demoralizing and corrupt bargain, by which the police of this 
city is to pass into the control of the criminal elements. 



ARE THE TRUSTS IMPREGNABLE? 
Are the combinations known as trusts above and beyond the 
reach of the law? If they are, it will not be long before every great 
staple article that is the subject of trade and commerce will be 
corraled by a combination of capitalists and peddled out to con- 
sumers at such prices as the combine may choose to demand. Mar- 
velous progress has been made in that direction within the past two 
or three years, and the trend of things is in no manner of doubt. If 
the process cannot be checked, competition in trade will ere long be 
at an end. The man of moderate means may become a stockholder 
in a vast combine, but may not set up in business (or continue 
in one if he be already in it) as a producer on his own account. 
Manifestly, if this thing is to go on, the methods of doing the world's 
business are bound to undergo a wonderful transformation. The 
problem presented is as far reaching as any that ever occupied the 
mind of man. If laws cannot, in accordance with the Constitution 
and our ideas of liberty, be framed which will effectually protect in- 
dividual enterprise against the crushing power ot great combinations, 
the fact cannot too soon be understood to the end that business men 
may prepare to accommodate themselves to the new order of things. 
Is it possible to devise such laws? That is the problem which the 
House Committee on Manufactures has^ had before it for many 
months past. It has wrestled long and arduously with the subject; 
has earnestly considered several bills presented to it, but a majority 
of its members are said to have reached the conclusion that Congress 
is powerless to enact any laws that will prevent combinations of the 
character indicated. Every man's right To buy and refuse to sell all 
that he has money to pay for, is declared to be one so clearly pro- 
tected by the Constitution that no possible law can take it away, and 
that which a man can do by himself he has a right to do in combina- 
tion with others. That, at any rate, is the argument upon which the 
alleged impregnability of trusts is founded. The opinion is given by 
members of the Committee that the Trust organizations are so 
shrewdly perfected that no law can be made to reach the active 
agents in the combinations. If onr law-makers cannot evolve a safe 
legal principle that will reach the trusts, perhaps some great Consti- 
tutional lawyer may accomplish it. But. in that hope, we again run 
foul of the combines. They have bought up about every great law- 
yer in the country. The subject is a large one that is bound ere long 
to engage the attention of the world's greatest thinkers. 



The Mexican" Financier" says: It is understood that the Roths- 
childs of Paris have bought the Santa Rosalia copper mine in the Bo- 
leo D^trict, on the Gulf of California, the price paid being $150,000. 



THE GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE. 

It is said that Governor Waterman did not write his own message, 
but just how anybody knows that we are not told. What, however, 
we do know is that the message is a good one, and that the subjects 
which it treats are for the most part those which the Governor has 
taken much interest in and has personally investigated. It expresses 
his known views, and expresses them forcibly and well. If the Legis- 
lature could be induced — of which there is no hope whatever — to take 
up the various matters to which he alludes, and deal with them 
in the spirit of his recommendations, the whole State would have 
cause to rejoice over the unprecedented fact that a California legisla- 
ture has proved worthy of its trust. But things will not be done that 
way. There are, no doubt, excellent representatives from the coun- 
try who would like to return home with the good records they could 
make for themselves in the way we have indicated, but the city mem- 
bers under the control of the Boss have the balance of power, and 
can be depended upon to use it to serve personal ends only. They 
are at Sacramento for private rather than public purposes. They 
are there to make, and the amount of coin they take home will be to 
them the measure of the session's success. But Governor Waterman 
has marked out a programme that will be recalled two years hence 
to the dismay of the political party thit may now permit its many 
excellent recommendations to pass unheeded. The Democratic ma- 
jority cannot possibly do Governor Waterman or his party a greater 
political service than to ignore the good sense and wisdom of the 
many suggestions he has urged upon them for adoption. The time 
was when the Democracy could have been depended upon to see this, 
but that time is not now. Its brain and. conscience are not in the 
keeping of its present leaders. 



FOOD FOR WORKERS. 

During the recent campaign it was frequently claimed that the 
American laborer got through more work than his European com- 
petitor. The statement was not always accepted as true, but there 
are good, substantial and scientific reasons why it should be. Pro- 
fessor Atwater has just published certain interesting facts regarding 
the food consumed by the laboring classes in this country and in 
Europe that go far to explain the cause of the superiority of Ameri- 
cans in industrial pursuits. We are all aware, in a general way, that 
the workingman in this country is far better fed than his European 
rival; but few of us have stopped to consider just how much better 
fed he is, and to draw the just conclusion from the premises. The 
nutritive value of food of course depends on its capacity to form 
bone, muscle and tissue, or the fat that furnishes fuel for the human 
steam engine. This quality is called by scientific writers " potential 
energy," and the unit of measurement used in calculating it is termed 
" a calorie." German experts assure us that from 2,500 to 3,000 ca- 
lories must be furnished daily to the average man if he is to be kept 
in good working condition. As a matter of actual fact, statistics 
show that the food used by the laboring classes of Europe, even of 
the higher grade, seldom gives more than from 2,000 to 2,500 calories. 
Perhaps the most poorly fed operatives in this country are those 
employed in the New England mills. Yet the Massachusetts Board 
of Labor finds that the food consumed there furnishes from 3,000 to 
3,500 calories of potential energy, while among certain advanced 
classes of workingmen it produces as much as 5,000. Here, then, is 
the fact rationally and conclusively demonstrated that the American 
workman is capable of the greater effort. The best kinds of food, 
being cheaper here, are more largely consumed, and more work and 
higher wages are the result. 



PROTECTING THE SUGAR INTERESTS. 
The press dispatches announce that Ctaus Spreckels and the 
Louisiana sugar planters have arrived at an understanding with the 
Senate Committee as to the method by which local sugar growers are 
to be protected in the future. The Senate's proposed reduction of 50 
per cent, in the duties at present levied upon sugar would have in- 
jured the cane growers of Louisiana as well as the beet sugar inter- 
ests of California. At the same time the committee could not afford 
to forego its proposed reduction, because that is the principal factor 
in its scheme to scale down the surplus. It involves a reduction of 
the taxation to the amount of nearly $50,000,000 annually. It would 
afford the people relief by giving them a more nearly free breakfast 
table than they have at present. For the Senate to recede was to 
abandon its very simple solution of the tariff question. In this state 
of the case a compromise was necessary and it has been reached. A 
bounty of one cent a pound is to be paid upon sugar of home growth 
and manufacture. Thus protection to the native industry is amply 
maintained, the protectionist promises of the campaign are kept, the 
future of beet sugar in this State is safe and the much dreaded surplus 
will be scaled down if the Senate tariff passes into law, as it likely 
will, though not before the next session of Congress. Sugar bounties 
are by no means new. France first adopted them and achieved won- 
derful success by their uses. Germany followed suit, and has much 
reason to congratulate herself that she did. France and Germany 
have become the greatest sugar producing countries in the world. 
The News Letter long ago pointed out that the easiest and safest 
way of scaling down the surplus was to reduce or abolish the sugar 
duties and protect local growers by bounties. It is glad to witness 
the adoption of a policy it so early advocated. 




8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



16 



Ms&si^ 



r ^5^*' 



Hear the Cn« 
Oue that will 



JTT7 TTORNEY Knight and Governor Waterman have had a niis- 
/ \ u ad era landing. Mr. Knight claims thai Governor Waterman 
c~\ assured biro that he would make him, by virtue of his olHce, 

X X Insurance Commissioner. This was of great assistance to 

Mr. Knight during the campaign. When extolling the merits 
and virtues ot the Republican presidential candidate, Mr. Knight 
always reserve. 1 a few kind words for his friend Waterman. But 
when he rushed to the Governor with a glad, expectant light in hia 
eye, Mr. Boruck, iike unto an archangel with a drawn sword, barred 
bis progress to the gubernatorial presence. But Knight cast aside 
archangel Boruck and tackled the Governor. His Excellency's reply 
to Mr. Knight's importunities was a masterpiece of diplomacy. lie 
said he had EO get his teeth filled. " When am I going to get my 
office?" asked Knight. " Which would you recommend, gold or 
amalgam?" replied the Governor. "I have your sacred promise, 
and 1 will not be denied," clamored Mr. Knight. " I am afraid I 
shall be compelled to have this wisdom tooth completely scooped 
out." mildly rejoined the Governor. " What sort of a man are you, 
anyhow, to treat the gentleman who nominated you in this scandal- 
ous way ?" shrieked Mr. Knight. "I have heard. they can graft a 
tooth on the comb of a rooster." said the Governor, " but I'll be 
darned if they graft any second-hand old tooth on me!" And then 
archangel Boruck swooped between the exasperated Knight and the 
diplomatic statesman, and a blue mist of profanity enveloped Mr. 
Knight as. cursing the Governor's molars and incisors, he strode from 
the audience chamber. 

Mr. Moody is raking in sinners by thehuudred. He is exhorting, 
thrilling, electrifying, paralyzing, doing everything in fact that a 
first-class, A No. 1, top-of-the-heap revivalist is expected to do. Mr. 
Moody is an old hand at the bellows. He can drive a sinner down a 
crooked alley without giving him a chance to double back. He is on 
terms of the most intimate acquaintance with all the biblical char- 
acters and refers to them with a charming familiarity, as if they lived 
just across the way from him, and it was his daily habit to pass the 
time of day with Matthew, borrow a chew of tobacco from Mark, 
loan Luke his evening paper, and invite John to step around the cor- 
ner with him. But apart from this irreverence, which grates on the 
nerves of any one who is not in Mr. Moody's line, 1 question the good 
of revivals as a soul-saving process. I do not think that the coalman 
who sits on the bench of the penitents, will refrain from giving nine- 
teen hundred pounds for a ton, or the grocer who thumps his breast 
and openly proclaims himself a sinner, will put an ounce less of sand 
in his sugar because of his conversion. In other words, the revival 
is nothing more than a religious circus, and Mr. Moody as ring- 
master has grown wealthy and fat by the show. 

The dying groans of the Los Angeles boom still faintly echo in 
the conservative North. The land for an area of fifty miles surround- 
ing Los Angeles is dotted with surveyors' stakes, indicating streets 
and avenues, trodden only by the busy feet of the adventurous scale- 
bug. In fact, there is the devil to pay down South. The speculators 
who sold the land have come North and allowed their victims to sit 
down upon their purchases and scan the horizon with anxious eyes 
for the next southern country boom, which is contemporaneously 
due with the arrival of the next eclipse, that is to say, three hundred 
years from date. Strangers coming North are somewhat puzzled and 
amused when observing handsome cement pavements surrounding 
tracts inhabited solely by the horned toad and the merry tarantula. 
The only industry that thrives in Los Angeles to-day is the under- 
taking business; and although that moribund city is already pretty 
well sprinkled with those ghouls, there is lots of room for more. 
Since the infiux of Eastern people, however, a new cemetery has been 
started, the picturesque features of which bid fair to rival the far- 
famed orange groves. I have no sympathy for the place. Its boom 
was a peterfunk transaction from itsincipiency to its disastrous close. 

A New York manager, who, for obvious reasons, begged the 
interviewer not to publish his name, declared that actors are not 
admitted into Lhe best circles, no matter how high their rank in the 
profession. He attributes this to their uncontrollable propensity for 
mashing. That manager is a sensible fellow, and I would like to 
shake him by the hand. Actors have not, since that time when the 
old English law declared them vagabonds, done anything to remove 
that impression. They and their womenkind are the unfailing source 
from which the press draws its slanders. There seems to be some- 
thing about the profession incompatible with that indefinable charac- 
teristic which belongs to the true gentleman. Of course, there are 
very many good and moral people in their ranks, and it would be 
strange if there were not, for the tribe is numerous; but they're 
much better left to their own social life, and kept apart as much as 
possible from the non-masquerading part of humanity, ^vhich pays 
them to paint, rouge and sob and laugh, and dance and sing, and 
caper for its amusement. 



She sat beside the rippling stream- 
She was the miller's daughter; 

And pensive, in a maiden drejtin, 

1 lased on the purling water. 
I cast my line imth^ the pool, 

She raided her eye-, in wonder. 
And said, " Not here you'll tint! the fish; 

1 think they're lying yonder." 
I crossed the rustic bridge, and moved 

Toward where the maid was sitting; 
1 knew she was the girl 1 loved, 
And so 1 feared her Hitting. 
But no; she smiled, and I sat down 

And talked about the weather. 
She said, " I fear my father's frown 

Should he see us together." 
I took her hand and swore that I 

Believed in filial duty ; 
And then I could but glance and sigh, 

So radiant was her beauty. 
She screamed and started to her feet, 

" What is this sudden danger?" 
1 cried; she shrieked in piercing tones 

"Oh, kill it, gentle stranger." 
She shook her skirts; ah, then, I knew 

The cause of all this racket, 
The lovely maid was harassed by 

A shameless yellow jacket. 
I killed it, where, 1 will not say, 

I'll spare my sweet one's blushes; 
But though we're wed a year to-day, 

When e'er among the bushes 

We wander band in hand, and I 

Refer to that bold slaughter, 

She says 'twas Cupid in disguise 

That stung the miller's daughter. 
Now that election is over, the dailies, having no longer the can- 
didates to abuse, are alluding to one another as scurrilous traitors to 
the interests of the public. This is a dead give-away. No sooner do 
we begin to put on airs and style ourselves a grand metropolis than 
out come the papers, barking and hooting at each other like the 
Doqtoum Vindicator or the Red Quick Bugle. In the cities of the East 
there is none of this press billingsgate. They consider it unbecoming 
great metropolitan journals to snarl and growl and say, " Yah, your 
press is no good. You come downstairs and see my press." Or, 
" Confess you're lying about your circulation and I'll give you a bite 
of my apple." This sort of business does not prevail, and the sad 
truth comes home to us, jammed in by this unpleasant characteristic 
of our newspapers, that we are but an overgrown village, after all. 

Reports from the seat of the State Government, where the law- 
makers are in council, are of an appalling character. They say that 
this noble body has drawn its sword as one man, and its slogan is, 
"Give us boodle, or give us death." The rash citizen whoapproaches 
that Legislature with a measure, and without a sack, takes his life in 
his hands. True, he may be permitted to enter the State Capitol 
but the moment it is discovered that he has a bill and no sugar to 
back it up, he will be cast from the dome, and his bleeding corpse lie 
unburied lor forty days as an awful warning to all rash clients. 

The Eastern fellow, jingling his copper cents in his pockets, is 
with us. Now, while we have no objection to sell him our lands, he has 
many traits to which we are directly opposed. He cuts things a 
little too fine according to our notions, and, while there is a great deal 
to be said in favor of New England thrift and neatness, and so forth, 
we don't want too much of the Pilgrim Father alloy in our California 
gold just yet. 

A military disagreement between a brace of foreigners in the Latin 
quarter this week resulted in the stabbing of one of the wranglers. 
The graphic reporter described the weapon used as a stiletto. In 
the hands of an American it would have been called an ordinary 
sticker, but the tenets of the profession require that an oyster knife 
in the hands of an Italian is at once transformed into the romantic 
stiletto. 

" Poor Jones ! he is going to the dogs. I met him on Kearny 
street to-day. and he could scarcely walk straight." 
" Sorry. What has upsel him so? A love affair? " 
U A love of air? No, indeed! A love of whisky, I reckon." 
The attempts to discourage Mr. Harrison from giving a big in- 
augural ball are mean. Dr. Coggswell is on the alert. He is getting 
a new fountain ready for the White Plouse. Alas, it looks like a 
mighty dry term ! 

" Ha ! I see a drunkard coming into the hall," screamed Revival- 
ist Moody, and the faces of over forty prominent citizens who were 
strolling in to be amused were suffused with blushes. 

Kilrain and Sullivan have at last agreed to fight. If, like the Kil- 
kenny cats, they could devour one another, leaving nothing but their 
jaws, it would be a national benefaction. 

"What magnificent material a good business-like tornado would 
have in this city. Why, it would rain wooden shanties for an hour 
after its passage. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 12, 1889. 



EAR N. L.: Ain't it funny the way 
't things goes in regnlar streaks. 
Now just look at all the frolics 't 
was goin' on before Christmas, 'n 
now, since New Years, it's been 'a 
dull as ditch water (to use one o' Bean's expressions). 

There's a startlin' rumor fillin 1 the air 't the frisky matron is a goin' 
to astonish the natives with an original idea o' her own (Laura says 
she got it from Mrs. Langtry's last fad with the ushers in the theatre 
for Macbeth). Anyway she's a goin' (so says rumor) to give a cotillion 
up to her house on the Avenoo, 'n have all the men dress as High- 
landers in kilts 1 They say 't she says she natters herself she 
can get as shapely a set o' fellahs together as any one in town, 
'n just make the society wimmen green with envy, 'cause they can't 
be there to see. Report don't say who the partners o' these fellahs ia 
goin' to be (for o' course the men can't go it alone in a cotillion 
racket). The old Judge says 't to top the whole thing the wimmen 
should be dressed in scarlet. Ain't he the worst! 

Don't you know 't the nicest thing in the world for a young man is 
to have a jolly matron for his partic'lar friend. She manages 't he 
shall see his favorite o' the hour, invites 'em to dinners, teas, 'n so 
forth, sings his praises among all his lady acquaintances, 'n is sweetly 
sympathetic herself. Such a one can be found to a Montgomery- 
street hotel (not the old clashbag, by a large majority); 'n she is 
gettin' to be looked upon as a treasure by several 't I know of. Quite 
different from this charming matron is another habitue o' the same 
hotel {habit ub is a relic o' the Coquelin season), who also gives little 
affairs— to her friends, but for herself ; that's where it comes in. But, 
gracious me, if all's true 't one hears, she needn't a-take the trouble 
to ask folks so's to get a good time for herself, for her husband don't 
care a continental what she does— he plays a lone hand hisself. 

This is a comical town, sure's you're born, 'n lots o' queer folks live 
in it. Just look at that " mixed marriage!" The peace 't was patched 
up lately by the elderly female relative ain't a-goin' to last, rumor 
says. Then, again, is that chap *t was seen havin' a diner en tete-a-tete 
to the Maison Riche the other evenin', and that's runnin' a awful big 
risk (though I must say 't the delicious things *t you get to eat there 
is enough to make a fellah run 'em lots). 

Kelly told me yesterday 't Carey Friedlander is a-goin' to get mar- 
ried this Spring, 'n now all the girls is puzzlin' their brains as to who 
on top o' tnis earth it can be. Some say: " Look in the direction o' 
Menlo Park," but I, for one, don't take no stock in that notion. 
Carey ain't a-goin* to let hisself go for no amount o' sentiment, un- 
less there 's ore in sight; or, to use his own metaphor (ain't that a 
toney word?) he don't propose to harvest grain 't won't bring grist to 
his mill. Did y' ever! The girls is all hopin' 't the Presidio chaps '11 
wake up 'n give 'em a real army german like the one they had when 
the lady patroness o' the crowd gave 'em the big drum ('n report 
said ever so much more). It appears 't the L. P. is in a kindo' big 
sulk 'n can't be depended on for more floral tributes 'n other things, 
so I reckon they '11 have to depend on other quarters — not at the 
Post, but for " friendly aid." 

I say, though, did you hear o' the big rumpus 't was kicked up the 
other day in the menage (more Coquelin) o' one o' the railroad gang? 
It appears 't the man took his wife to look at a elegant cabinet 't he 
wanted to give her for a Christmas gift, 'n she found out from the 
dealer 't the cabinet had a trick or secret drawer, so she was de- 
lighted, 'n the purchase was made on the spot. Now, it so happened 
't the husband had found out the same thing on a previous visit to 
the store, but hadn't said nothin' about it. So, after a few days had 
passed, he was loafin 1 round the library one afternoon 'n the thought 
struck him *t he 'd try if he could make* the thing work. Sure enough 
he did make it open, 'n there, tucked away, he found a bundle o' 
notes 't forthwith he proceeded to read. My gracious! warn't there 
a warm reception waitin' for the missus when she come home from a 
afternoon "tea?" The result has been a suddenly-decided-upon 
visit East, 'u no one knows if ever a return '11 be made. Ned says 
why will wimmen be such fools as to treasure up compromisin' let- 
ters? 'n why will men be bigger ones still to write 'em? 

Ain't it kind o' strange 't the prevailin' fad o' the day among our 
elite bein' Anglo-mania, 't the tall blonde 't posed for a professional 
beauty in London ain't made more stir since she arrived on her 
native heath. The question o' the hour has been, where is the little 
chap 't put the matrimonial fetters on? Has he passed into the dim 
fog o' the big city 'n got lost, or does he still live? But before I shut 
up, let me tell you somethin' 'ts goin' to create a big sensation, or 
little Mag is muchly mistaken. One o' the leadin' elite, or as the 
Pandora man calls 'em, our 400 — is goin' to give what is known as the 
latest agony in the East, i.e. , a flower ball ; each guest to be costumed 
's some particular flower (the old Judge wants to know if some o' the 
men might go as grog blossoms), 'n you can just think what a state 
of excitement it '11 put the wimmen into, choosin' whether to be a 
heartsease or a lily. There's been several parties o' this kind given 
in Noo York already, but the proposed one '11 be the first o' the style 



attempted out here. Ned says he knows a woman 't 'd make a per- 
fect thorny cactus. The old Judge asked what flower all the girls '11 
be sure to avoid choice of, 'n would you believe it, we was all too 
stupid to guess? Wallflower, o' course. 

Apropos o' that old Judge, he is as full o' riddles again 's a egg is 
full o' meat. He wanted to know why San Francisco was entitled to 
rank with the older cities of the world in historic remains. Now 
everybody began at once to guess, 'n you never did hear such things 
as they guessed, but no one struck it till ma sung out, " Ain't it be- 
cause of the group of fossils called the Academy of Sciences?" 
'n you bet she'd hit the nail on the head. But, la me, wouldn't old 
man Harkness be awful mad! 

One more riddle o' the old fellah's before 1 quit: "Why are the 
festive school marms like a band of politicians in Washington?" 
" 'Cause they want places," says I. " Not so bad, little maiden," re- 
plied the old beat, " but not quite it. It is because they're sure to lay 
seige to the White House." Gracious me! if he don't meau 'cause 
handsome Raphael Weil 's a School Director— the idea. Well, I guess 
I'll say adoo— so, ta ta. Mag. 

"Did yoo swear off this year, John?" "Yes, but not till the 2d of Janu- 
ary." "Why?" " Well, I couldn't think of doing so till after my splendid 
New Year's dinner at the Maison Riche." 

Vases, plaques, incense burners, jars and toilet boxes, in Latsuma, 
Cloisonne, etc., at G. T. Marsh A Co.'s Japanese Art Repository, No. 625 
Market street. 

Messrs. Deutz & Geldermann's 

GRAND VIN d'AY 




GOLD LACK SEC! 

In Magnums, Quarts and Pints, 

OF THE FAMOUS 1884 VINTAGE. 

For Sale in bond or duty paid by 

Charles Meinecke & Co., 

Sole Agents Pacific Coast, 

HAND-MADE SHOES, $8.00. 




FROM THOMAS', LONDON, 

15 New Montgomery St., 



Coder Grand Hotel. 



GO TO 

C3-. "W. CLABK & CO.. 
653 Market Street, 

FOE 

WALL PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES, 

And CORNICE POLES. 

JAS. DUFFY & CO., 

IWTBBIOB DECOEATOBS. 

WALL PAPER— Endless Variety of Patterns, 

FIRST-CLASS WORK GUARANTEED. 

CARPETS, WINDOW SHADES, ETC. 

811 Market Street. Flood Building. 

The Larcher & Moe Schools 
op 

LANGUAGES, 

70 Flood Boilding, San Francisoo. Hamilton Hall, Oakland. 

Edward Larcher, Theodore M, Moe, Principals. 



Jan. 12, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKR. 



17 



LETTER FROM THE TYROL. 

Mi iivn, Tyrol, December i". L88& 

BEAR EATS: We ere still clinging t" Ihe outskirts of Gar- 
mum , though rapidly ncaring Italy, In search <>t something 
Ilka our glorious climate of California, ITrankfort, as b oity, 
baa a distinctly neruf tic physiognomy. Its Aaiitojfnanof belongs 
to that denomination, but the bid Jewish quarter. In which 
Ihe original Rothschild house is >tiil pointed oul to visitors* la fast 
ditfappearlng, i<> make room f*T the bandeome new buildings which 
the ever-increasing Influi ol strangers demands. To me the most in- 
tereeting Feature ol Prank fori was ihe little bouse in the old Kirsch- 
graben street, where Qoethe was born, where i»- lived hia childhood 
and youth, dreamed the dreams o( genius, and upon which in his 
"Troth and Fiction" he has set the seal of his own immortality. 
The house stands under the special care and protection of the Goethe 
Boctety, by them the rooms are as Faraa possible kept in their original 
condition, relics of the greal poet's life are here carefully gathered, 
From his baby clothes, bis childish efforts In writing, drawing ami 
painting, [be nltl-fushionml piano ami writing desk (town to the house- 
hold articles that surrounded him during his latter years. In the 
yard Still Stands the old pump at which Queep Louise of Prussia and 
her sister, then both young princesses Of Weimar, enjoyed the frolics 
that Qoethe -peaks of in ins autobiography. 

From Frankfort to Heidelberg seemed just a step, and so we could 
not pass that pretty city on the banks Ol the Neckar without seeing 
its cattle, which, though in ruins, is probably the finest specimen of 
the barogue style yet extant. We wandered through the once beauti- 
ful halls, where the grass grows now, and which are occasionally 
animated by the students of Heidelberg when celebrating one of their 
characteristic banquets, where beer and poetry are wasted in equal 
measure. The world-renowned barrel which used to hold thousands 
and thousands of quarts of wine is still to be seen in the cellar. 
What a tit companion it would make to our big trees! We left the 
dreamy atmosphere of the Heidelberg Castle, aud once more took 
the train to dear Munich, with the intention of visiting, in its vicin- 
ity, :m'IiIoss Bergon-the-Starnsee, where poor Ludwig If. of Bavaria 
found his untimely death. The lake itself cannot compare with any 
of those of Switzerland, but the " fatal spot," as the employes touch- 
ing!)- allude to it, where the King sought his death, has its melan- 
choly charm still to such an extent that not only two court ladies, 
immediately after their sovereign's death, followed his sad example, 
but that, every now and then, romantic young people end their lives 
by throwing themselves into the water at the same place, which is 
marked by a simple granite monument, upon which there are always 
fresh Bowers, while in the lake, where the body of the King and that 
of his faithful physician were found, is reared a wreath-crowned 
cross. 

Castle Berg is a three-story square structure, whose four corner 
towers give it quite a mediaeval look. The first Moor contains kitchen 
and servants' rooms, the second floor salons and guest chambers, the 
third floor poor Ludwig's apartments, consisting of dining-room with 
red plush furniture and curtains, a salon in blue, and, in the tower, 
with three windows looking upon the lake and its picturesque banks, 
the cosiest little library, with blue covered writing table and arm 
chair. In all these rooms are paintings and engravings representing 
scenes from Wagner's operas, busts of the great musician and statu- 
ettes of his operatic heroes. The late King's bed-room is very simple 
with its light blue silk hangings and coverings for bed and furniture. 
The toilet table accessories are of blue Bohemian glass, the pictures 
represent scenes from the Nibelungen, the ornaments are principally 
alabaster statuettes of Tannhauser, Lohengrin, Siegfried, etc. From 
a like room, adjoining his bed chamber, winding stairs lead down to 
a stone tank, where the royal patient— for Ludwig only inhabited 
Berg when his malady bad become hopeless— took his morning plunge. 
On the day of our visit the grand old park around the castle looked 
bleak and sad, the leaves rustled mournfully, and the cascades and 
fountains had a funereal note in their murmur, so thai we gladly 
hailed the boat that was to take us back to the station. From there 
we soon reached Munich, where our stay had to be shortened, if we 
wanted to arrive in the sunny south before Christmas. So, one fine 
morning, we started toward Italy via the Brenner Pass, though the 
season was somewhat advanced for a trip through the Tyrolean 
mountains. The scenery has a peculiar winter beauty, the rugged 
peaks being covered with snow, while the slopes with southern ex- 
posure still wear their green Summer mantle, and the slender water- 
falls that leap from the summits, have not been fast enough to escape 
the icy hand of frost, that has caught them in their flight and chained 
them, till they hang as long icicles over the rocks, like stellactites, 
forming grottoes of sparkling crystals, or. widening at the ends into 
fanciful forms, look like the fruit-shape gems of the Arabian fairy 
tales. 

We reached Meran at evening and broke our journey, only tor a 
night's rest, but we are here still, because the sky is bright like that 
of California, and the Winter sun is warm like our own. The hotels 
are full of guests, and the promenades that extend for miles along 
the banks of the river Passer are gay with people who have come to 
spend the Winter, to breathe the pure mountain air which gives 
strength to weak nerves and lungs. If, in Wiesbaden, everybody 
limps, here every one coughs. 

I must mention the different manner of expressing thanks that 



strikes me as charai t eristic of the three German nations 1 have « ..me 
in contact wiih, I li.< I'nh.Miin says, euiily : " Thanks, very j" the 
Bavarian: .utifully;" the Austrian: "Thanks'; I ki*s 
your hand." ___^_ HlKQNl BLL1 

tr in vrrniK you would be oeat, 
A hat will make the Job complete; 

\ini iimt is what'* tin- matter. 
1 Commercial b1 reel, 

Jusi look f-T uiiiie, tbe hatter. 



.i W. Carman y 25 Kearny street, displays a splendid btoes of gentlemen's 

clothuii- nmt funn-iou-; goods rc lie rally that caunot be beat ou the Coast 



FURNITURE DEPARTMENT, 

recently added to our business, 
contains nothing but NEW 
GOODS 

CARPET DEPARTMENT 

is now daily receiving the new 
SPRING PATTERNS. 

UPHOLSTERY DEPARTMENT 
has just been replenished with 
LATE NOVELTIES. 

W. & J. SLOANE & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail, 

CARPETS! FURNITURE! UPHOLSTERY! 
641-647 MARKET STREET. 

THE LEAD ERS OF EASHIOI ! 

FINE PARIS WRAPS, 

IMPORTED ULSTERS, 

ELEGANT TEA GOWNS, 
MODJESKAS, 

NEWMARKETS, 

JACKETS, JERSEY WAISTS, 

Children's Cloaks and Suits, Monkey Furs, etc. 



The Largest Stock, the Latest Styles, and the Best Fitting Cloaks and Suits 
offered on the Coast, and at the Lowest Possible Prices. 

FINE DRESSMAKING TO ORDER A SPECIALTY. 

Packages delivered free of charge in Oakland, Alameda aud Berkeley. 
Telephone S03. 

FRATINGER'S, 

The Leading Cloak and Suit House, 



105 Kearny Street. 



[Not. 24. 



Electric Improvement Co. 

ELECTRIC STREET RAILWAYS, 

AMERICAN SYSTEM OP ELECTRIC ARC LIGHTING, 

STANDARD UNDERGROUND CO.'S LEAD-COVERED CABLES, 

MATHER SYSTEM OF INCANDESCENT LIGHTING, 

ELECTRIC LIGHT WIRES, LAMPS, ETC. 

Estimates furnished for Electric Railways, Electric Light and Steam 
Plants. 

OFFICE, 217 SANSOME STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

M. G. PRITCHARD, 
SPANISH TRANSLATOR, 

308 CALIFORNIA . STREET. [Dec. 25. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 12, 1889. 



"T" N the attempt now being made to wage war upon 
v the insurance companies and their mode of doing 
,r ~ cJ business, there is to be expected, of course, noth- 
.1 ing but one-sided statements from those who are 
engineering the attack. They are essentially 
what Bismarck calls " the lucubrations of one man surveying the 
situation by staring at the blank walls of a newspaper office." Now, 
the subject of lire insurance has a far-reaching influence upon the 
prosperity and progress of a city, and it would seem to be quite in 
order at this period of indiscriminate fault-finding to call attention 
to some of the advantages resulting from the present arrangement 
and manner of doing business. Above all, San Francisco now, for 
the first time, has insurance which does insure. In the days of wild 
competitition, about five years ago, the State was overrun with in- 
surance companies, which never paid a loss except at the end of a 
lawsuit. The rates were low, it is true, but the only thing that was 
assured was a disputed claim if a loss by fire occurred. The policies 
were nothing but ingenious contrivances and quibble-traps, all in- 
tended to avoid and defeat the contract of insurance, and it is a 
matter of record that some agencies never did pay a loss unless ab- 
solutely compelled to. Things have changed for the better since 
then. The policies are simple and concise contracts compared to 
what they were, and technicalities are waived, even where they might 
be successful, whenever the companies are assured that there has 
beeh sustained an honest loss. The average rate of insurance on an 
ordinary dwelling house on a three-years' policy is one-half per cent 
a year — that is to say, $15 a year on a $3,000 premium, a rate which 
is clearly not exorbitant, considering that they purchase insurance 
which does insure. The real estate interests, at least, have no seri- 
ous grounds for complaint. 

The real estate market in the opinion of interested parties is in bet- 
ter condition than it has ever been known to be at this time of the 
year. There is clearly coming to the surface a yielding disposition 
on the part of buyers ; the sellers are finding their offers accepted with 
much more readiness. The latest gossip is that the sum of $010,000 
has been offered and accepted by Mrs. Hopkins-Searles for the gore 
lot on the corner of Market and Post streets. The bid was wired 
East, and it is said has been accepted. Who the buyer is cannot be 
learned, but the supposition is that it is a bank. The property has 
been in the market Jor some time, and was held at $650,000. The im- 
provements on the property are of course valueless, and the sum for 
which it is supposed to have been sold represents therefore the value 
of the bare land. 

" The conditions being extremely favorable," as the spiritualists 
would say, it is to be expected that the busy broker is going to keep 
business going with all his might. Auction sales will certainly con- 
tinue a feature of the market, and with the return of settled weather 
the red flag will resume its position over the sidewalk. The eager- 
ness of the public to buy was well illustrated on Tuesday last at the 
sale of Sutro s lots on Seventeenth, Corbet and other streets. Every 
one of the 100 lots was reported sold, the bidding was active and 
prices went far beyond the expectations of the seller, notwithstand- 
ing the fact that the property is subject to a serious drawback — lack 
of water service. The records of the week fairly well illustrate the 
market's activity. The most noticeable feature is the fact that quite 
a number of sales in property south of Market street are reported 
again, although for several months past the demand for this class of 
property was clearly on the decline. The sales include 30xS0 on the 
west side of Third street, 160 feet south of Bryant, $8,070; 4Gxl37:6 
with an L of 25x91:6 in the rear, on the west side of Fremont street, 
229 feet south of Folsom, being the residence once occupied by Rats- 
ton; 20x60 on the west side of First street, 60 feet south of Natoma, 
$6,200^ 25x90 on thp north side of Folsom. 200 feet east of Ninth 
street, $5.900 ; 137 :6xl37 :6 on the west side of Beale street, 137 :6 feet 
north of Harrison street, and 101x275 and 104x137:6 on the north cor- 
ner of Folsom and Eleventh streets, for $67,700. 

North of Market street, within the wholesale business district, 
buyers were found for the following: 30:4x137:6 on the west side of 
Sansome street, 91:8 feet north of Clay; 25x59:9 on the south side of 
Commercial street, 50 feet west of Drumm. 

West of Kearny street a sale was had of 40x57:6 on the west side 
of Dupont street, 20 feet north of Pine. 

Business in Mission property has been quite fair. Sales include 
75x115 on the north side of Beaver street, 185 feet west of Noe, $5,600; 
50x100 on the east side of Howard, 50 feet south of Eighteenth street; 
55x100 on the southeast corner of Noe and Thirteenth streets, $4,100; 
75x95 on the southwest corner of Twenty-first and Dolores streets. 

In the Western Addition choice lots continue in demand. There 
were transfers of 25x120 on the south side of Oak street, 37 :6 feet east 
of Buchanan, $6,500; 24:6x89:6 on the southeast corner of Post and 
Webster, $8,100; 25x87:6 on the west side of Fillmore street, 37:6 feet 
north of Pine, $7,000; 01:3x137:6 on the south side of Jackson street, 
137:6 feet west of Franklin; 34:4x137:6 on the south side of Sutter 



street, 171:10 feet east of Broderick; 50x137:6 on the south side of 
McAllister street, 136 feet west of North Willard; 68:8x127:8 on the 
north side of Jackson street. 137 :6 feet west of Pierce, $13.600 ; 35x127 :8 
on the north side of California street, 225 feet west of Gougb, $7,600. 
There was also a sale of 50x75:11 on the west side of Twelfth street. 
115 feet south of Market. 

Woodward's Gardens will soon be a thing of the past. An action 
to bring about the partition of the property has been brought by one 
of the heirs, and, accordingly, we may shortly expect to see these 
blocks of land divided up into building lots. These gardens are by 
many considered as responsible for the sparse settlement of the prop- 
erty lying north and west of it. 

Palermo is getting up in the world. There are now set out in or- 
chards about 1,600 acres; the greater portion is oranges, olives and 
figs. It is expected that to this there will be added about 400 acres 
by May next, making in all 2,000 acres. Accordingly, Palermo, as a 
fruit-producing region, is bound to be heard from in a few years, for 
the quantity which can be grown upon the above acreage, as well 
tilled as the small holdings of this colony are bound to be, is enor- 
mous. The judgment of the promoters of this enterprise in select- 
ing the vicinity of Oroville as the site of their colony, seems in a fair 
way to be triumphantly vindicated. 

If you have carpets that need to be beat, 
Send to the S. F. Carpet Beaters, 23 Tenth street. 
S. Ferguson's work is prompt and neat. 



NO POISON, 



No germs, no fungi aud no impurity of any kind is ever found in any of 
the wines and brandy put up aud sold by the 

PURITY WINE GO. OF CALIFORNIA. 

Absolute purity, richness aud delicacy characterize their goods. Their 
wiues are as much better than some of the new and impure stuff sold as 
California wine as refined sugar is better than the raw. Nobody will ever 
use the impure, when the pure cau be obtained. 
Nov. 24.j Office, No. 303 Battery Street S. F. 



CARRIAGES. 



We invite your attention to our recent ar- 
rivals of HIGH GRADE work, at reduced prices. 
BUSINESS BUGGIES A SPECIALTY. 

A. A. JACKSON & CO., 

33 Market Street, S. F. 

GEORGE GOODMAN, 

Patentee and Manufacturer of 

ARTIFICIAL STONE, 

IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 
Schilling-er's Patent for Sidewalks and Garden Walks a Specialty. 
June 9.1 Office, 307 Montgomery Street, Neuada Block, S. F. 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE, 1887. 
THE GOLD MEDAL AWARDED TO THE 

NATIONAL BREWING CO., 

Was given not for export or fancy display, but for the best 

Lager Beer Brewed on this Coast. 

FIRST PRIZE AGAIN MECHANICS' FAIR, 1888. [Dee. 15. 

DR. RIGORD'S RESTORATIVE PILLS. 

Buy none but the Genuine— A Specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical 
Debility, Wasted Forces, etc. — Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
aod the Medical Celebrities. Agents for California and the Pacific States, 
J. G. STEELE & CO., 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), Sau Francisco. Sent 
by mail or express anywhere. PRICES REDUCED. Box of 50 pills, $1 25; 
of 100 pills. $2; of 200 pills, ?3 50; of 400 pills, ?6; Preparatory Pills, $2. 

Send for Circular. 




BEWARE of Imitations. The Genuine is signed 



TKADE-MABK. 



Jan. 1J. ISS'.l. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTEI 



Hi 



"BIZ. 



' AM akv Isnot&month ih.it we usually expect or i"<>k fur 
any Important trade operations. It i> the time t" review the 
.■i. I to prepare for the future. The business of 1888 was 
upon the whole satisfactory; sorely the volume of business 
was large, while the percentage of pmtit was perhaps below the 
average <>( years past. The sea*on thus fur in California, if not 
throughoat the entire Pacific Coast, ia certainly very propitious to 
the agriculturist, the horticulturist, the miner, in tact to ail indus- 
tries. V7e have thus far.had a full average rainfall. The ground is 
in tine condition for cultivation and the plow and seed-sower can be 
seen running In ail directions. Grass and Grain are now up and 
growing rapidly. Pasturage is good, and the Cattle and Sheep upon 
a thousand hills are thriving nicely. The market is now well sup- 
plied with dairy produce, prices of Butter, Cheese and Eggs are all 
on tin- down grade, actually causing return shipments of Eastern 
Butter whence it Came, there being no market for it here at a price to 
cover. Again we And thai our garden supply of vegetables — Berries, 
etc, art* becoming quite plentiful. New Potatoes, Asparagus, Rhu- 

barb. Green Peas, etc., are on sale in our markets, while there has 
not been a day this Winter when there could not be found Straw- 
berries and Raspberries in the market grown in the open air. Now, 
when we look around and about the city, we find many fruit dis- 
plays— Citrus and other fruits at the State Board of Trade rooms on 
Market street, or the Placer county exhibit of Oranges, Apples, 
Lemons, etc., at the Starr King building on Geary street, the latter 
exhibit just open to the public. These exhibits are indeed wonder 
workers and are evidences of great and wonderful developments of 
progress. 

The Treasure shipment to the Orient per Belgic, on the 5th in- 
stant, consisted of $208,775 to Hongkong, $81,906 to Bombay. The 
Belgic's cargo for China included: 8.383 bbls. Flour, 12,395 lbs. Gin- 
seng, 1,267 galls. Whale Oil. etc., value $208,885; to Japan: 320 bbls. 
Flour, 54 bdls. Leather, and Merchandise, value $6,165; to Singapore: 
12" cs. Canned Goods, value $572; to Corea: Merchandise, value 
$206; to Sourabaya: 50 cs. Salmon, value $300; to Batavia: 70 cs. 
Canned Goods, value $355; to Bombay: 35 cs. Canned Goods, value 
$140. 

The Northern Wheat trade is rapidly expanding; since August 20th 
Tacoma, Washington Territory, has exported up to December 29, 
18X8, 21 ships for United Kingdom, carrying 1,095,275 ctls., value, 
$1,(100,900. Much of the above was Oregon product, and formerly 
exported via Columbia river direct, either via San Francisco or from 
Astoria. At last advices, ship Ed. O'Brien was loading Wheat to Eu- 
rope at Tacoma. The bkte. S. G. Wilder, hence to Honolulu, carried 
479Dbls. Flour and Merchandise, value $24,308. Schr. Dora Bluhm, 
to Muhukona, carried Merchandise of the value of $2,081. W. G. 
Irwin, hence for Honolulu, had Merchandise of the value of $24,568. 
The steamer Australia, hence for Honolulu, had Merchandise, value, 
$93,000; the W. B. Godfrey, from Honolulu, brought for cargo 18,371 
bags Sugar, 50 bbls. Molasses, etc. ; the Alden Besse, from Kahalui, 
had for cargo 144 bbls. Molasses, 17,007 bags Sugar etc.; bkte. Ella, 
from same. 6,666 bags Sugar; Mary Winkelman, hence for Hono- 
lulu, has 550 obits. Flour and Merchandise, value, $13,G20 ; the Planter, 
for same, Merchandise of the value of $7,G88. 

Sugar imports of late have been free and liberal, not only from the 
Hawaiian Islands, but from Java, and now we have the British ship 
Ladah, 75 days from Manila, with 2,850 tons Sugar for the California 
Refinery. The present price of all white refined is 7 cts. 

Grain charters to Europe exhibit great firmness. Wheat and Flour 
receipts combined and reduced to grain for the past two cereal years, 
dating from July 1st to January 8th, thus compare: 1887-88, 6,900,000 
ctls.; 1888-89, 10,500,000 ctls.— thus showing a large increase for the 
current season. The present spot price of Wheat is $1.42J^@$1.45 
per ctl. : Flour, $4.50@$5 for extra, superfine $2.50(5 $3 ; Barley— Feed, 
80c.@75c. ; brewing, 85c. to 90c; extra choice, 95c. @97>£c. per ctl.; 
Oats— Feed, $1.12H@$1. 15; Surprise, $1.15@$1.20 per ctl.; Hay, $10@ 
$14 per ton; Hops, 12Kc.@17c. The Fruit market is well supplied 
with Apples, Oranges, Limes, etc. Dried Fruit very plentiful and 
cheap; Almonds and Walnuts abundant. 

Placer County , which is called the Los Angeles of the north, has 
an interesting free exhibit of fruits, flowers and vegetables, at the 
Starr King Building, 123 Geary street, which is well worth seeing, 
since the display shows what is possible of accomplishment in the 
citrus belt of California. Partisans of Southern California claim for that 
region unparalleled inducements for fruit growers to locate; but those 
who see this wonderful exhibition will not be slow to admit that, ex- 
cellent as the southern region is, some sections of the northern 
citrus belt can give the south several points, and then come in more 
than a neck ahead. The exhibition is well worth seeing and studying. 

He presented a lace collar to the object of his adoration, yesterday, 
and, in a jocular way, said, " Do not let any one rumple it, darling." 
"No, dear, " said she; " I will take it off." — New York News. 

" The Lost Chord " is a bad thing to sing during the high price of 
coal. 

Poison-oak cured by Steele's Grindelia Lotion. Twenty years' experience 
has proved this remedy to be aspecifie. Apply immediately after returning 
from a picnic excursion, and the dread eruption will be prevented. James 
G. Steele & Co., 635 Market street. 



PHONOGRAPH! 

Tlir Pacific Phonograph Company, holding a license 

tor tin' 8tatce "i' California, Nevada and Arizona, are 
now ready to receive orders for tin- [ease of Phonographs 
ami Phonogrnpli-i iraphophones. 

Tlir Company will receive its proportionate share of 
instruments as rapidly as they can be delivered from 
the factory, bul in consequence of the large territory to 
be supplied, the number will probably be limited for the 
next six months, anil they will lie supplied to subscribers 
in the order of their applications 

The instruments are perfect recorders of the human 
voice in conversation or song, and of instrumental music 
of even- possible character and kind. It speaks for itself 
as against all adverse criticism, and the credulous and 
skeptical are alike bewildered at the wonderful perfec- 
tion of its work. 

It is simple in its mechanism, and can be manipulated 
by the most obtuse novice with a few hours' instruction. 

It is a rapid and faultless stenographer. As a letter- 
writer is fluent as speech, and transmits the exact tone 
of the correspondent's voice. It is a perfect musician 
for the human voice or any musical instrument. 

Every record once made can be reproduced an indefi- 
nite number of times. 

The Phonograph and Phonograph-Graphophones will 
be exhibited to those who desire to become patrons, at 
the office, 323 Pine Street. 

Having thus far but one of each instrument, we can- 
not at this time make our exhibition more general. 

THE GOLDEN GATE SPECIAL 



Commencing December 8, 1888, 

I WILL LEAVE | 

2:00 P. M. ^S A N FkANCISCO 2:00 P. M. 

( Every Saturday ) 

CONNECTING AT 

COTTIsrCHi BX/LTIFIFS -A-IsTID CHICAGO 

WITH 

Special Trains for all Eastern Cities. 
SOLID VESIIBULE TRAINS, 

COMPRISING 

Pullman Drawing-room Sleepers, 

Dining Car, Smoker, 

Bath, and Barber-Shop. 

SLEEPING-CAR RESERVATION CAN BE SECURED IN ADVANCE 

613 5 MARKET' STREET, I 613 

' Sail FranciBco. ) 

[Dec. 1.) 

HENRY G. HYDE, 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR - AT - LAW, 

MICROSCOPICAL EXAMINER 

Of Handwriting, Inks, Papers, etc., in the Detection of Forgeries, 

Counterfeits and Imitations. 

411';, CALIFORNIA STREET. San Francisco. 

DRESS SUITS FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS! 

j- . C O O IP IE! IS, 

MERCHANT TAILOR- 

24 New Montgomery St., Palace Hotel Building TJuue 30. 

LOUIS R0EDERER~CHAMPAGNE. 

Tin' Highest Grade Champagne in the World. 

(WHITE LABEL) ' 

A Magnificent Rich Wine. 

" GKEa^:r>r:D -\ri:c>r sec," 

(BROWN LABEL) ' 

Perfection of a Dry Wine. 

See that every Bottle hears the private label of 

MACONDRAY & CO., 

Sole Aqents for the Pacific Coast. 




20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 12, 1889. 



THE WORLD, FLESH AND DEVIL 

KHERE is one wearer of divided skirts worth mentioning, writes 
Clara Belle. They are not only divided, but added, multi- 
plied, subtracted and otherwise fooled with. They belong to 
_,_ Lettie Lynd, a dancer in the burlesque company that has 
come here from London. She is a graceful dancer and she 
kicks as high as her head. But never are her legs visible above her 
knees. Asked how she managed to be so decorous in her deviltry, 
she said : " Lots of people have made guesses as to how I drape my 
skirts and how many of them I wear, but very few of the guesses are 
even remotely correct. You see, I wear about a dozen filmy lace pet- 
ticoats, and each is as long as the other. They vary in weight hut not 
in length. Yes, they are semi-bifurcated, and they are draped in a 
way that T could not tell any one but a woman. They are made 
from a different pattern and are draped entirely different from those 
which Miss Vokes uses, and although I fling myself around with 
seeming recklessness when I dance, I do so with supreme confidence, 
for I know that the skirts envelop my limbs so safely that nothing 
but a tantalizing modest expose* is made. It is a bit strange, by the 
way, that I learned this daring style of dancing when I was four years 
of age, and I had really forgotten all about it when, some eighteen 
months ago, the manager asked me if I could suggest something new 
in the way of a dance. I drew the design of the petticoats myself, 
ami a girl friend, who is sworn to secrecy, made them up from these 
designs. Now, I sat in the front row of the orchestra last evening 
on purpose to solve the problem of Letty Lynd's underclothes. The 
stage is rather high at that theatre, and it was like looking up into 
the milky way of the sky to gaze at the danseuse's plentitudeof white 
skirts. The sight manifestly dazzled my male escort, but I was calm 
and observant. Her agile feet and knee-high portions of her legs 
flew here, there and everywhere with surprising agility, and the 
skirts mere flung about wildly, but never did they betray her confi- 
dence by a bit of disclosure. As she had said, she wore a dozen filmy. 
Huffy lace petticoats. The outer ones were ordinary. Then came 
some that were really pantalettes, for they encircled her legs separ- 
ately, and hung down exactly as long as the others, and the inner- 
most was tight to the limb. Finally— and here was the true secret of 
the contrivance— there were ample draperies, matching the rest in 
fabric and length, suspended between her legs, and attached at the 
sides to the pantalettes. That made the mass of petticoats solid all 
around her legs, and no matter how rapidly she whirled, how wide 
she straddled, or how high she kicked, the distended and flaunted 
skirt never yielded a glimpse above the pliant hinges of Letty 's knees. 



Some of our nice girls, asserts the St. Paul Globe, have got a 
naughty idea from the ballet. You remember, don't you, that a com- 
mon freak of ballet and burlesque costuming on the stage is to put a 
long skirt on an actress, but to slit it at the side from hip to hem. so 
that at "every step the leg comes coquettishly into view? Just as the 
men strained and tiptoed for glimpses of the nimble girl in her dress- 
ing room, when their tickets entitled them to far fuller views of her 
on the stage, so these slit skirts cause more of a sensation than do an 
entire absense of skirts. Well, that's the thing copied by a few of our 
social belles. Of course, they don't actually wear divided skirts and 
disclose their pink stockinged walkers, but they simulate the effect. 
A skirt of some dark material is cleft at each side, and into the divi- 
sion is set a narrow piece of light, pink-hued satin in accordion 
pleats. At every step this inserted section opens a bit, revealing a 
gleam of the flesh-colored, gleaming satin. As the surface of fabric 
thus exhibited takes on much of the shape and motions of the limb 
underneath, you can understand how at first glance there is a start- 
ling suggestion that an accidental rip is turning a street costume into 
a ballet rig. And all the while the pretty rogue looks as demure as 
the feminine section of a Sunday-school, seemingly unaware of the 
trick in colors that she is playing. 

A prominent New York photographer told a Sun reporter the 
other day, that not only had the hand and arm photograph become 
a rage among the Gotham girls, but that a great many women bad 
applied to him to photograph their feet, and— ahem !— ankles. " We 
do not undertake this branch of the profession, but such applications 
are common, and there are photographers who take such pictures 
unhesitatingly." He said that he had not long before expressed a 
doubt of the fact to an actress who applied to have her foot and ankle 
pictured, whereupon she went away and returned with half a dozen 
views of her right foot that were taken by a second rate photographer. 
She had removed a shoe and stocking, and then sat so as to have 
front views, side views and back views. And the photographer added, 
two or three of the pictures were very comprehensive, indeed, the 
foot being only an incidental item in the view. The actress said she 
could get all such pictures she wanted , but that it was her ambition to 
have them with a first-class photographer's imprint on the cards. 
" We cannot be too nice," said the clerk, "in order to maintain our 
standing. Photographing has been rendered very sensitive by the 
improper uses it has been put to by unprincipled persons. The in- 
stant the public has an idea that a photographer will depart from the 
rigidest rules in his business, you have no idea what a rush is sure to 
follow by persons who want sensational pictures taken." 



The problems that are submitted to the medical and surgical pro- 
fession are oftentimes marvelous. The late Dr. Sands is said to have 
had a case presented to him, where, curiously enough, the patient, a 
wealthy man of advanced years, wanted to be cured of the malady of 
love. His case, as he explained it, was that he had made a vow early 
in life never to marry. Until within a short time he had never seen 
any one of the female sex for whom he had conceived a feeling of 
love. Finally, however, a woman crossed his path whose image was 
constantly with him. He was a believer in phrenology, and had a 
theory that if Dr. Sands would perforate the base of the brain at 
the back of his head, where phrenology teaches the bump of ama- 
ti ven ess lies, and draw off some of the blood which he was sure bad 
centered there and was creating the pressure, hecould be cured of his 
passion. The singular part of the story, as I heard it, is that Dr. 
Sands, after a long examination of the patient, was satisfied that he 
was sane, and actually performed the operation that he requested, 
with results so far successful that he is said to have raised the ques- 
tion in his own mind whether phrenology might not be something 
more than a barren theory. —New York Press. 



A curious museum has just been opened at Dresden, says the Pall 
Mall Gazette. In it are collected a number of boots, shoes and slippers 
in which emperors, kings, queens, princes and other august or famous 
persons have some time or other trodden the path through life. 
Among them are a pair of boots worn by Napoleon I. at the battle of 
Dresden, on April 27, 1813. and a pair of white satin shoes, embroid- 
ered in gold, which the same great Emperor wore on the day of his 
coronation ; another pair of strong leather boots which belonged to 
the famous French Marshal, Murat, afterward King of the two Sici- 
lies; a pair of high-heeled boots of Maria Theresa; boots of the 
philosopher, Kent, and many others, forming a curious assembly. If 
the promoters of the museum have any energy they will not find it 
difficult to increase their curious collection considerably and to make 
it one of the sights of Dresden. But they must search both highways 
and byways for their treasures; thus, for instance, they might per- 
haps obtain an interesting article from the good nuns at Nazareth 
House, Hammersmith, who preserve a large, comfortable-looking 
slipper of the late Pope under a dainty glass case in one of their large 
rooms. 

Mrs. George Gould's husband values her pleasure at something 
like $30,000, which has been put into a string of pink pearls, of which 
she is specially fond, and which are most enchantingly becoming to 
her delicate dark beauty. Mr. Gould has been a whole year collect- 
ing and matching these pearls, and half a dozen jewelers have been 
kept on the lookout for gems of a certain size and tint, in spite of 
which it was only a week ago that the last rosy globe was slipped on 
the string, the end of it fastened into a little love knot crusted with 
diamonds, which formed the clasp, and there lay ready in its blue 
case a gitt which not only represented $30,000, but, better still, a whole 
year's forethought for a fair lady's delight. 

A bad impression has been caused in clerical circles in Rome by 
the pointed refusal of the Pope to pronounce a blessing upon certain 
medals and reliquaries tendered him for that purpose by an Irish 
priest, who was presented to him at the Vatican by Monsignor Kir- 
by, rector of the Irish College. The Pope inquired whether these ob- 
jects were for distribution in Ireland alone, and being assured that 
they were, he said, sternly: " Then I cannot bless them. The people of 
Ireland are disobedient, and seem to prefer the gospel of Dillon and 
O'Brien to the gospel of Jesus Christ." — Court Journal. 



Reinhold Begas and Raschdorf, two German sculptors, have been 
empowered by the Empress Victoria to erect a tomb to the late Em- 
peror Frederick, on the sarcophagus of which, adorned with bas-reliefs 
and supported by eagles, will lie the royal remains, in his cuirassier's 
uniform, holding the laurel wreath sent to him by Emperor William 
after the battle of Woerth, the imperial mantle being thrown on his 
feet in a picturesque drapery. 



As an instance of what some people think that our law of libel is 
capable of, as it exists, I hear that a newspaper proprietor is threat- 
ened with an action by a widow, because his paper published an obit- 
uary notice of her husband, in which it was said, among other things, 
that he had "now gone to a happier "home! " — Vanity Fair. 



Mr. Labouchere thinks that sixty-five years is two great an age for 
a county-court judge. Yet be is prepared to hand the interests of the 
whole Empire, and of three hundred millions of people over to an old 
gentleman of nearly eighty. — St. Stephen's Review. 

The " St. Stephen's Review " says that the Empress of Austria 
and the Empress of Japan will be in America at the same time, and 
will.it is said, meet at the wish of the former lady. 

The lace for the wedding dress of Princess Sophia of Prussia is be- 
ing made at the famous Silesian schools, from a beautiful design in 
the Royal Museum of Industry at Berlin, and the crowns, crests and 
monograms are to be worked from a design drawn by the Empress 
Frederick. 



Jan. 12, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 




B3n)Lr-_J 



0f 



i IN EDIT* Ut, who haajnat sent 
out blank forms to Massachusetts 
men and women Of eighty years of 
age and upwards, inquiring -as to 
habits, eyesight, teeth, hearing, and 
BO forth, Dae, Bays Iron, received more than .V><H> replies, which throw 
considerable light on the question <>f longevity. The correspondents 
tnuetly ale meat, ad li'-., and used spirits occasionally. The old peo- 
ple are from town and country, aud nearly all still lead active lives. 
They partake of three tnealfi a day. Men and women alike are early 
risers, almost without exception, and nineteen out of every twenty 
have observed this custom through life. Exercise has been hard up 
LO sixty-five Or seventy years, and after that period has consisted 
I when the regular occupations have been given up) of walking or gar- 
dening, or both. Out of 1,000 men 483 have been farmers, and the 
re>t are divided among nearly all the other trades and professions. 
Tea and coffee drinking was indulged in by fully two-thirds of the 
3.500, with some of them to excess ; and of the men. nearly all have 
both smoked and chewed tobacco, the amount daily consumed by 
some having been enormous. Their cures were heavy, their work ar- 
duous. All were regular in their habits, with plenty to occupy their 
bands and minds, and getting plenty of fresh air. This seems to be, 
at least, a primal quantity in the problem of long life. Men like these 
are able to eat and smoke even to a point we should call excess, with- 
out injury, and even to drink at times with no evil resulting. It is 
those of sedentary habits, who do no hard labor and get little exercise 
or fresh air who must be careful. 

Cold Weather Rules.— Never lean with the back upon anything 
that is cold. Never begin a journey until the breakfast has been eat- 
en. Never take warm drinks and then immediately go out into the 
cold. Keep the back, especially between the shoulder blades, well 
covered; also the chest well protected. In sleeping in a cold room 
establish a habit of breathing through the nose, and never with the 
month open. Never go to bed with cold or damp feet. Never omit 
regular bathing, for unless the skin is in active condition the cold 
will close the pores, and favors congestion and other diseases. After 
exercise ot any kind, never ride in an open carriage or near the win- 
dow of a car for a moment; it is dangerous to health or even life. 
When hoarse, speak as little as possible until the hoarseness is re- 
covered from, else the voice may be permanently lost, or difficulties 
of the throat be produced. Merely warm the back by the fire, and 
never continue keeping the back exposed to the heat after it has be- 
come comfortably warm. To do otherwise is debilitating. When go- 
ing from a warm atmosphere into a cooler one, keep the mouth 
closed, so that the air may be warmed in its passage through the 
nose ere it reaches the lungs. Never stand still in cold weather, es- 
pecially after having taken a slight degree of exercise, and always 
avoid standing on ice or snow, or where the person is exposed to cold 
wind. — Sanitarian. 



The iodide of mercury is now used to some extent in France in 
tanning skins. It is said that the mercury salts act as a preservative 
of the constituents of the tanning liquors, and that the leather pro- 
duced from skins that have been previously treated in this manner 
is superior to that tanned in the ordinary way. It completely pre- 
vents the liquefaction of the gelatine which takes place in putrefy- 
ing hides, and thus saves them from this loss. A saving is also 
effected by its use in the prevention of the decomposition of the 
tannin in the tannin liquid, which is usually hastened by the intro- 
duction of the bides when in a state of decomposition. The amount 
of iodide of mercury required is so small that there is no danger of 
poisoning, either to the workmen or to those subsequently using the 
leather, in its use. 

Following the discovery of new uses of the cotton fiber and cotton 
seed, and of the common nettle, conies the news of the discovery of 
some remarkable uses to which the fiber of the banana may be put. 
The fiber extends the length of the body of the tree, or about fifteen 
feet, and is of silken fineness. The utilization of all vegetable and 
animal substances for the service of man is the great desideratum of 
humanity. A few years ago Matthusianism was believed — that is, 
that the race increased faster in proportion than the increase of food 
and other necessities of life. It is now understood by political econo- 
mists that, under a state of industrial civilization, food products and 
other requisites increase faster than population. 

The ancient custom of wringing the curfew bell has been resumed 
at Stratford-on-Avon, the same bell being used as that which was 
tolled at Shakespeare's funeral. 

Lithium is the lightest metal known, and is worth $160 per ounce. 
Gallium is the costliest metal known, and is worth $3,250 per ounce. 



Joshua Hendy Machine Works, 

Nos. 39 to 51 FREMONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 

HYDRAULIC MININii. QDAKTZ ASH SAWMILL MACIIIKF.KV, 
AUTOMATIC ORE FKEDKKS, " TKIl'Ml'H " 

ORE CONCENTRATORS, HYDRAULIC GRAVEL ELEVATORS 
HYDRAULIC GIANTS. 

AGENTS FOR THE WALK OF 
•CUMMER" AUTOMATIC ENGINES, 

PORTER MTO CO.'S ENGINES AND BOILERS, 
"BAKEK" ROTARY PRESSURE I1LOWEKS, 

"CLIMAX" BAND SAW-MILLS, Irom CluciuuatI, Ohio, 
'WILBRAHAM" ROTARY PISTON PUMPS, 

"BOGGS & CLARKE" CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS, 

P. BLAISDELL & CO.'S MACHINISTS' TOOLS. [Feb. 4. 

"HTM. NEWHATU&TcO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

Nos. 309 and 371 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California, 
Sole Agents Purimachos Fire-proof Cement, "indestruct- 
ible and infallible." 
Sole Agents for "Bull Dog" brand of Bass' Ale and Guinness' 
STOUT-Bottled by Robert Porter & Co. 

Sole Agents Johnson's Elephant brand English Portland 
Cement. 

general agents— national assurance co. of ireland ; 
atla3 assurance co. of london : 
boylston insurance co. of boston. 

OFFICE: 212 Davis St., room 2, San Francisco. 
WAREHOUSES: Eighth and Brannan Streets. 

LIBERAL ADVANCES MADE ON GOODS IN STORAGE. 

All kinds of perishable goods takeu on storage. For rates and other in- 
formation apply at the office of the Compauy. The Warehouses are uuder 
the management of a skilled Superiuteudeut, who has for mauy years beeu 
connected with one of the largest cold storage warehouses in New York. 

£^r^"The public are invited to inspect this establishment. [Sept. 15. 

PARKE & LACY, 

21 and 23 FREMONT STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MINING, WOOD AND IRON WORKING MACHINERY. 

pjNGINES, BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS, 
BELTING, OILS AND SUPPLIES. 



A. LUSK & CO 



SAN FRANCISCO. 
Packers of the following celebrated brands: 
LUSK BEAR BRAND, 

J. LUSK CANNING COMPANY, 

SAN LORENZO "ACK1NG CO. 



H. B Williams. 



A. Chesebroogh. 



VY. H. Dimond 



WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
UNION BUILDING, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 



Agents for Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific Steam Navigation Com- 
any.The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship Company, "The Californ:a Line of 
Uppers," from New York and Boston, and "The Hawaiian Line." 



J. D. Spreckels & Bros., 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

Agents for Spreckels' Line of Hawaiian Packets, S. S. Hepworth's Centri 
f ugal Machines, Reed's Patent Pipe aud Boiler Covering. 
327 Market Street, corner Fremont, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

S. L. Jones. E. D. Jones. 

S. L. JONES & CO., 

Auctioneers and Commission Merchants, 
207 and 209 California Street. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 12, 1889. 



THAT LABOR PROBLEM. 

It turns out that there is no startling labor problem to solve after 
all. It is now conceded that there is no such " dearth of labor " and 
no such " crisis " in the industrial affairs of the State as will lead to 
the "fruit rotting on the trees and a return to wheat growing and 
sheep raising." The oracle in such matters has given up the whole 
game as it rirst started out to play it, and now insists, as loudly as it 
began by declaring otherwise, that all that is needed to save the fruit 
from rotting and prevent the sheep from grazing amidst the orchards, 
is to bring the employer and employed together. That there is even 
a redundancy of labor is admitted. If there is any difficulty at all, it 
is, as the News Letter pointed out last week, not so much a lack of 
labor as a bad distribution of it. That fact is now being hugged by 
our versatile contemporary as a grand discovery, which it vouchafes 
lo deal with in a manner satisfactory to itself and acceptable to 
everybody. Nobody need object to a cheap ride if the weather be tine 
and the car accommodation good. But has not the great "crisis" 
reached a somewhat impotent conclusion when it has dwindled 
down to the attenuated proportions of a traveling advertisement? 
As to the efficient distribution of labor, we have some recollection 
that the Boards of Trade and the railroad were co-operating to attend 
to that matter. The workman may well ask for transit at reason- 
able rates to the points where his labor is needed, and this the rail- 
road is even more ready to grant than he is to demand it. There is 
every reason why it should be. It is selfishly interested in extending 
the area of cultivation and in the husbanding of the largest possible 
crop. The more freight there is in sight the better the common car- 
rier likes it. It is clear that not many tons of fruit will rot in this 
State which can be saved by the mere act of giving laborers a cheap 
ride. It is a pity that so much has been made out of nothing. East- 
tern people have been led to believe that California has changed her 
mind in regard to Chinese exclusion, and would-be immigrants with 
means are likely to be deterred from settling in the Stale by reason 
of the alleged dearth of labor. 



THE HUNTINGTON LETTER. 

When the able men who built the Central Pacific Railroad first 
combined together for the accomplishment of their great purpose, 
they allotted among themselves the kind of work which each was best 
fitted to do. Thus it fell to the organizing and constructive genius 
of the late Charles Crocker to superintend the actual construction of 
the road. To the clear-visioned, hard-headed man of business, C. P. 
Huntington, was given the then desperate task of managing the 
company's finances. Its bonds were difficult to sell, but they must 
needs be sold, or the road could not be built. The only possible 
market for them was New York, where he has ever since resided. 
Little by little he won his way until he is to-day one of the most in- 
fluential and trusted financiers of the country. Finance is his forte. 
To Governor Stanford was given the headship of the company. He 
was and is its manager of men, its diplomat, its statesman, so to 
speak, and its president. Great questions of policy had to be eluci- 
dated and determined by his strong and vigorous mind. When, 
therefore, we want to know the railroad's policy on any given point, 
we know to whom we should listen. As a business man of New York, 
Mr. Huntington recently addressed to the Chamber of Commerce, at 
that place, a letter favoring the repeal of the Chinese Exclusion Act. 
He did so in his capacity as a voter and citizen of that State, and not 
as a director of the railroad voicing its wishes. He has been so long 
out of California as not to be in touch with its people, and probably 
knows Utile of the consensus of opinion and feeling by which all par- 
ties here have agreed that the permanent future of California will be 
best served by a total cessation of Chinese immigration. Senator 
Stanford has since spoken with authority on that point, and in terms 
so full and explicit as to leave nothing further to be desired. The 
policy long pursued by the railroad has been openly in keeping with 
the Senator's views. It has, for some time past, been straining every 
nerve to build up the State with white settlers and laborers. There 
need, therefore, be no disquietude in any quarter in regard to this 
matter. 



DEATH OF FREDERICK G. SMITH. 
Frederick G. Smith, for several years past the paying teller of the 
Bank of California, died on Sunday last at Paso Robles Springs, 
where he had gone for recuperation only a few days previously. Mr. 
Smith came to California in 1855 and settled in Marysville, where he 
entered the pioneer banking house of Reynolds, Reis & Co., and re- 
mained with them for years after the removal of the bank to San 
Francisco, after which he was paying teller of the old banking house 
of John T. Sime & Co. until the firm dissolved and went out of busi- 
ness in 1869. The next year he entered the Bank of California, and 
rem tined in an active capacity until his death. He was a son of the 
well-known capitalist, Adam Smith, who resides on Van Ness avenue, 
and leaves a widow and three children in comfortable circumstances 
He was a Knight Templar, a Free Mason and an influential mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Red Men, and belonged to the Na 
tional Guard of California, of which he served for years as quarter- 
master-sergeant, and earned his exemption certificate in June, 1872, 
as a member of the Nationals of the First Infantry Regiment. The 
funeral occurred on Thursday from the Masonic Temple, and was 
conducted with Masonic rites. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



HorVie Mutual Insurance Company. 

Conformably to the provisions of Section 1 of the By-Laws of this Com- 
pany, the next aauual meeting of the stockholders will be held at its 
principal office, No. 216 Sansome street, San Francisco, California, at 1 
o'clock p. m., on 

Monday, January 21, A. D. 1889, 
for the election of Directors to serve until their successors shall be elected 
under the provisions of the By-Laws. Polls will be open from 1 to 4 
o"clock. CHAS. K. STOKY, Secretary. 

San Francisco, January 2, 1889. . [Jan. 12., 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Oceanic Steamship Company. 
The regular annual meeting of stockholders of the Oceanic Steamship 
Company will be held at the office of the Company, 327 Market street, San 
Francisco, California, on 

Monday, the 2t st day of January, 1889, at the hour of 11 A. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
ineetiug. Transfer books will close on Thursday, January loin, at 8 o'clock 
p. m. I Jan. 12.] E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Crocker Gold and Silver Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Crocker Gold and 
Silver Mining Company will be held at the office of the Cumpauy, room 26, 
Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California, on 
Monday, the 21st day of January, 1889, at the hour of 1 o'clock. 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Thursday, January 17th, at 3 P. m. 

AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 
Officb— Room 26, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. I Jan. 12. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Del Monte Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Del Monte Mining 
Company will be held at the office of the Company, No. 310 Pine street, 
rooms lo and 17, San Francisco. California, on 

Wednesday, the 23d day of January, 1889, at the hour of 12 o'clock M. 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meetiug. Transfer books will close on Friday, January la, ISSj, at 3 o'clock 
p. m. J. W. FEW, Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. [Jan. 12. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the SierraNevada Silver 
Mining Compauv will be held at the office of the Compauy, room No. 15, 
Nevada Block, San Francisco, California, on 

Wednesday, the 16 h day of January, 1889, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing Trustees to serve for the ensuing year, and 
for the transaction of such other business as may legally come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will be closed on Monday, January 14, 1689. 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 

Office— Room 15, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. I Jan. 5. 

ANNUAL MEETIN6. 

Anglo-Nevada Assurance Corporation. 
The fourth annual meeting of the stockholders of the Anglo-Nevada 
Assurance Corporation will be held at the office of the corporation, at No. 
410 F\ne street, San Francisco, on 

Monday, January 21, 1889, at 3 o'clock P. M„ 
Jan. 12. J LOUIS SLOSS, President. 

KINGSFORD'S OSWEGO STARCH 

—IS THE — 

STRONGEST, 

PUREST, 

AND BEST, 

AND IS RECOMMENDED As 
THE STANDARD ALL OVER THE WORLD. 

FOE INVALIDS, 

iKiiisrosFOiaTj's cobb st-A-tack 

Is Highly Recommended for its Purity and Delicacy. 

ML VERNON COMPANY, BALTIMORE. 

*W" The undersigned having been appointed AGENTS FOR THE 
PACIFIC COAST for the sale of the manufactures of above company, have 
now in store: 

SAIL DUCK— ALL NUMBERS; 
HYDRAULIC— ALL NUMBERS; 
DRAPER AND WAGON DUCK, 
From 30 to 120 inches wide ; and a Complete Assortment of All Qualities 
28^-INCH DUCK, FROM 7 OZS. TO 16 OZS., Inclusive. 

MURPHY, GRANT & CO 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY. 

No. 810 Sansome Street, : : San Francisco 
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN FURS. 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medal, PariB. 1878. 
«^-These Pens are " the best in the world." Sole Agent for the United 
States, MR. HY. HOE, 91 John St., N. Y. Sold by all Stationers. 



Jan. 12, 1869. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



BOOKS AND AUTHORS. 

KHBBE is a iu-\v tnlitit'ii ..f (he " Memoirs of Count Graimmt," 
by (mini Anthony Hamilton, which adds to that already 
plentifully stored treasury ol good things, tin- biographies ol 
throe «'f the favoriiies of Charles II. and the !>uke of York, 
Then histoire* gaUania arc taken from Mrs. Anna Jameson, 
so thai the Memoirs now represent the labors of live famous people. 

Dictated by Gramont, they were written in the purest and most ex- 

aataite French by tin- brilliant scion ot the honse of Ormonde^ tran- 
slated into English by Horace Walpole); ^ir Walter Seott added some 
biographic sketches, and dow there i* Mrs. Jameson's " record of frai| 
kulies." The volume has at least forty illustrations, including por- 
traits, biatorloal scenes and views of notable places. 

• * • « • 

Amelie RfTOB-Chanler writes a clear, legible hand, and her M8S. 
are called " copper-plate copy " by the printers. She always uses a 
gold pen, and one of her Christmas gifts from her husband was a gold 
quill, quaintly fashioned after nature, with one sharpened end to be 
used ns the pen, the handle delicately chased in a design of laurel, and 
the little feathered end encrusted with diamonds. There is an ink- 
stand, of course, in which this dainty weapon is to be dipped, a hand- 
some, solid affair of crystal, supported by two Lores standing on a 
base of gold, which bears, in diamonds and surrounded by a laurel 
wreath, the monogram of the famous young Virginian. 

****** * 

" The House aud Its Builder," by Dr. Samuel Cox of England, is 
recommended by the truly orthodox as the antidote to " Robert 
Klsmere." Dr. Cox is recognized as one of the keenest and most 
conscientious of interpreters of biblical matters, and, as his title sug- 
gests, " The House and Its Builder" is a magnificent attempt to 
prove that there is no law without a lawgiver. 

***** 

In the opinion of a contemporary, Mr. William D. Howells could 
not travel on his face as a man of genius. He is a short, thick-set, 
round-shouldered man, having more the appearance of a Bowery boy 
than a delicate and graceful humorist. His iron-gray hair falls in 
unkempt masses over a forehead "villainously low," and his eyes 
have more of a savage sulleuness than intellect in their expression. 
He dresses very badly, and, judging from his appearance, one would 
naturally suppose that he was not on good terms with his tailor. He 
writes with great rapidity, turning out ten printed pages a day on a 
stretch. Since the critics, big and little, have begun to speak plainly 
of his novels, Mr. Howells is not so sweet-tempered as he was when 
everything he wrote was praised to the skies. 

***** 

Olive Schreiner, the author of that powerful and painful book, 
"The Story of an African Farm," is publishing a continuous alle- 
gory in a woman's penny paper of England. Each chapter appears 
under some strange, new heading, and all are instinct with the mys- 
ticism, the doubt and the spiritual despair which characterized her 

novel. 

***** 

Robert Browning is a short, stout, jolly little man, who looks as if 
he never wrote an abstruse line in bis life, and whose ruddy face gives 
evidence of his fondness for a good dinner. In fact, he is a famous 
diner out, in great demand by hostesses and quarreled over by the 
guests, who consider it a vast privilege to be placed next him at table. 
He is more than agreeable in manner, and quite devoid of affectation 
and self-consciousness. He is devoted to Americans, especially 
American women, and frequently enrages his England by alluding 
to London as a suburb of America. 

***** 

" The Berkeleys and Their Neighbors," by M. Elliot Seawell, is a 
clear, charming picture of Virginia life " befo' de wah," made up of 
the usual ingredients — warm Southern color, one or two strong fig- 
ures of the old chivalry, a delicate, girlish outline, white and pink, 
against the dusky background of faithful darkies, and — oh, of course, 
a trial in the criminal court. Except for this time-worn traditional 
blot on the landscape the picture is fresh, cool, sweet and pure. 
There are some faults in the construction, carelessness, evidently ; 
but on the whole, is readable and refreshing— after Amelie. 
***** 

Mr. H. S. Salt is to publish a biography of James Thompson, to 
which will be added a study of the works of the author of " The City 
Of Dreadful Night," and some hitherto unpublished poems. 
****** 

Collier's Once a Week seems determined to have "names." Mays 
Hazeltine and Blakely Hall are both largely advertised as the latest 
addition to the staff, and Henry Guy Carleton is to expatiate in its 
columns on further mysteries connected with the " Thompson Street 
Poker Club." A recent issue of the weekly published Amelie Rives' 
11 My Lady Tongue," a short story whose singular title covered unaf- 
fected stupidity, and which contained the usual " short corduroy skirt 
and buckskin leggins, covered with rich red stains of Virginia mud." 
It will be a relief to the public when those leggins are worn out, or 
even cleaned. 

* i * * * * 

Mrs. Humphrey Ward has decided to answer some of the furious 
attacks made upon " Robert Elsmere," and is now as busy upon this 
work as her ill-health will permit. 



Serial St;oryi 

MISS I. E. BRADDOtf, 

AUTHOR OF 

"Lady Audley's Secret," 
"Aurora Floyd," 

And man)' more of the most successful novels of the 
present century, 

HAS BEEN SECURED FOR PUBLICATION 

IN THE 

SUNDAY EXAMINER. 



IT IS ENTITLED 



"The Day Will Come!" 



AND IS PERHAPS 



THE MOST ZDZR^IMI^TIC 



OF ALL HER NOVELS. 



The plot is an intricate one, based 
upon a great -wrong and a terrible 
retribution. 



The First Installment 

WILL BE PUBLISHED ON 

vT^HSTTTJLIR,^" 20TH. 

TJaa. 12.1 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 12, 1889. 



"NEWS LETTER" POSTSCRIPTS. 

" Did you hear about Steve Johnson trying to get into the club 
the other night?" 

" Yes, sah. You mean the old, bald-headed coon dat was white- 
washing?" 

11 Yes. Too bad he couldn't be admitted." 

" But he was admitted by a unanimous vote." 

" Oh, no; your information am not correct. He couldn't get in 
because he was black bald." 

" Oh, go way. You think you're smart, don't you?" 

"I met a daisy young lady at the McJoneses party last night, 
Harold," said the father to the son—" so graceful, so " 

" What was her figure, governor? " 

"A million and a half." 

" I meant was she slight or robust ; but your answer makes a reply 
to my original question unnecessary. I shall be glad to take a letter 
of introduction to her." 

" The impudent rascal ! Just like his father ! He'll get on." 

There was an old woman, and what d'ye thirik? 
She would get boozy on very strong drink. 

When they coaxed, she said " Fudge! " 

" Sixty days," said the Judge; 
And her countenance now is losing its pink. 

' ' Got a new sewing machine at your house, you say ? ' ' 

"What kind?" 
" Domestic." 
" Any attachment?" 

"Yes, I must confess to a little attachment for her; but I don't 
dare let my wife know it." 
"Oh!" 

Many merchants engaged in taking stock frequently find them- 
selves at the end of their rope; but out on the plains a man detected 
in taking stock often finds himself at the end of the vigilance com- 
mittee's rope. 

"The Philadelphia" 7 ' Sunday Transcript" is~much"brigh"tef"than 
formerly. Why? Because it uses so many "News Letter post- 
scripts " without credit. " A word to the wise," etc. 

TheMartinez "Item "rises to remark that "The San Francisco 
editors are wasting much valuable time in abusing each other." 

We are glad to be informed that the time of a San Francisco editor 
is valuable. 

" First class, stand up. What is a reign ofjterror?" 

Up goes one hand. 

" Well, Johnny, what is it?" 

" Please, sir, a rain of terror is when it rains cats and dogs." 

SUNBEAMS. 
An Omaha man recently arrived in Boston at the Boston and Al- 
bany station. The streets of his native city are laid out with regu- 
larity, it is well to state, and are of a width commensurate with west- 
ern lavishness. The man from Omaha duly entered a hack and 
asked to be driven to one of the leading down-town hotels. The 
driver proceeded as had been his wont for years, and had nearly 
reached his destination when these words from the carriage window 
greeted him with considerable force and abruptness: "Look here, 
driver! I'm tired of being driven through all these allevs. You've 
done nothing but go through them ever since we started. Now get 
right on to one of the boulevards so we can get abead." The driver 
had enough self-possession to stammer in reply: " Why. sir, this is 
Washington street, OUT principal sheet!" —Boston Times. 

The other day young Simpkins, a friend of the W family, of 

Germantown, whose ardent admiration for pretty Mrs. W is 

known to everybody but her husband, strove to hug Baby W , 

but baby roughly repulsed him. " I don't want any of that! " cried 
he. "And why, pray?" asked his father. " Because it's enough for 
him to be squeezing the life out of mamma!" tartly replied baby. 
General consternation! —Philadelphia Transcript. 

Dr. P went to the office of the Board of Health yesterdav to 

band in the certificate of the birth of a well-known North Sixth street 
woman's baby. "You have omitted the father's name," said the 
clerk, after glancing over the paper. "He didn't remain with the 
: mother long enough for her to get it," replied the physician. 

— Exchange. 
i A new complaint against the two-cent postage stamp is the bad 
I flavor of the mucilage. The critics seem to think that the Govern- 
ment can afford to carry letters all over this star-spangled country 
for two cents and flavor the stamps with strawberry or pineapple. 

— Pittsburg Chronicle. 
Hattie — Yes, my husband is very rich. Fannie— And you enjoy it 
all very much? Hattie— Very much indeed. Fannie— And your hus- 
band? Hattie--Oh, well, you know in this world, dear, we have to 
take the bitter with the sweet. —Washington Post. 

Bobby (to sister) — Give me a sweet kiss. Sister— Certainly, dar- 
ling. (Kisses him). Bobby— Oh, not that kind; give me a rowser, 
like the one you gave young Smith ; pant and roll your eyes up and 
say, "oh, don't! " —Town Topics. 

Nothing will stop the use of cigarettes— unless the makers take to 
giving the picture of a user with each pack. — Puck. 

Nature uses a good many quills with which to make a goose, but a 
man can make a goose of himself with only one. 

— Orchard and Garden. 

Her Bosom Friend— Did your husband give you a kiss for Christ- 
mas? Ditto— No, but yours" did. —Town Topics. 

The low corsage gives rise to a great deal of back talk. —Puck. 
And some of it is sure to cause af-front. 



MATTHIAS GRAY CO, 

206 Post Street, 

General Agents for the Celebrated 

STEINWAY & SONS' PIANOS ! 

(the best in the world). 
Ernest Gabler Pianos, 

Kranich & Bach Pianos, 
c. roenisch pian08, 
Dec. is.] C. D. Pease & Co.'s Pianos. 

SCHEMMEL'S MUSIC HOUSE, 

72, 74, 76 and 78 East Santa Clara Street, San Jose, Cat. 

STEINWAY & SONS' and 

GEORGE STECK & CO.'S 
PIAITOS. 

I I" YOU WANT A 

FIRST-CLASS PIANO 

Cheap and on Installments, 
GO TO 

STii.THAM <Sc CO., 
1322 Market Street. 

O. A. LUNT, 

TE R PSI C H O R E A N ARTISTE, 

Academy, I3I0 Polk, near Bush Street, San Francisco. 

Classes as Follows: 

Monday. .Berkeley and San Francisco I Thursday San Francisco 

Tuesday Alameda Friday. Oakland and San Francisco 

Wednesday Saa Francisco | Saturday San Francisco 

MRS. DORA GRAY DUNCAN, 

PIANO-FORTE TEACHER, 
Is prepared to furnish Piano-jorte Music for Balls, Parties, Musicales, etc. 
Other Instrumental Music also provided if desired. 
Address— 1365 Eighth Street (Center Station), Oakland: 

Care of Bruen's Music Store. Broadway, Oakland; 
Or care of Matthias Gray Co., 206 Post street, 3. F . [Dee. 15. 

J. TOMKINSON'S LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 

Nos. 57, 59 and 61 Minna Street, 

Bet. First and Second, San Francisco One Block from Palace Hotel, 

J5^" Carriages and Cabs at Pacific Club, No. 130 Post street; also North- 
east Cor. Montgomery and Bush. Carriages and Coupes Kepc at stable espe- 
cially for calling. Turnouts to rent by the month. Venicles of every 
description at reduced rates. Telephone No. 153. 



Charles R. Einselen. 



Louis J. Tschder. 



DELMONICO RESTAURANT AND CONFECTIONERY, 

8 to 14 Q'Farrell Street, San Francisco. 
Balls, Parties, Weddings, etc., Furnished at the Shortest Notice. Private 
Apartments for Families and Banquets. 

Telephone 808. 
TSCHURR & EINSELEN, Proprietors. 

mann ing's 
Restaurant and Oyster Grotto, 

14 and 15 Powell Street, opposite Baldwin Hotel. 
Oysters in any style delivered to all parts of the City. 

Estimates Furnished for Supplying Banquets, Dinners and Suppers. 
fPec. 25.1 

"p OR Social Gatherings, whether 

Public or Private, there can be 

no more Elegant a Wine used than 



FINE TABLE @c* 
WINES ^ 



PROM OUR 

CELEBRATED ORLEANS 
VINEYARD. 




Eclipse 

Chamyagne 

530 Washington ii 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Eclipse Champagne 



Its Delightful Tasle, Delicate Fla- 
vor and Absolute Purity should be 
sufficient recommendation to all Irue 
lovers of Good Wine, But its crown- 
ing quality is, that, unlike Imported 
Champagnes, it has neither Brandy 
nor Alc ohol added to it, and therefore 
even its freest us e never leaves ooe 
with a headache. 



Jan. 12, 18>9, 



8AN FRANCISdO NEWS LETTER. 



25 



THE LIBRARY TABLE 
Of all collections Hi rot and rubbish Lbal have baeo dabbed with 
ilif nunc, oi poetry, and wn1 uut to try thr patience and torture the 
lendbUlUttoi ■ world bul Illy nUuned i«» song ai Its best, one oi the 
wor-t has Juei been Issued from tin- Boone of Tin' Banorufl Company. 
It-* title i^ " Poem* from the I'.nitii-." and the name ul the wrher is 
■tven «" Venter Vuldo. It i* detticated u* "Glare Putts, the Portia of 
the Pacific,*' and •>*> forth. Tin- opening " poem " Is entitled " Iffy 
Lord, the Laureate." and in meant to throw sarcaam and invective 
at Tennyson. Probably the laureate can bear op under it if his 
critics ran. Tbe following couplet from the rubbish will give one a 

fair Idea of it : 

■• Peace, peaoe, l> poet, lame and old, passing on into tin- night 1 
Tbe lamp of your ideal youth would give your Lame feel better 
light" 
Hut Tennyson's " lame feel " are as ootbing mmpared to those in 
the above, lt^ movement i> like a rickety wagon over an old-fash- 
ioned OOrduroy mad. ami il> sentiment about as poetical as that 
emanating from a malarial jungle. Indeed, there is not a poetical 
idea, nor a poetical expression of a commonplace idea even , in tbe 
entire collection. Eight '* sonnets " are given— twelve-line sonnets. 
if we may term them such. Poets make sonnets fourteen lines long. 
That is where M r. Voldo differs from the poets. The following is de- 
licious in it> idea o! grammar: 

•• Ah. me! how brightly on the laughing river 
Tbe liquid summer of thine eyelids sbine!" 
The first line of the succeeding stanza reads thus: 

" Each every airy step of life rejoices." 
'• Each every " is good, because it is so original! In " Thine Eyes " 
appears the following remarkable stanza : 

'■ I see strange dreams burn in thine eyes, my dear, 
And mount on roseate ladders far above, 
\\ here silvery palaces of Saints appear, 

Where dwells therein the olive and the dove." 
That verse is a sort of "happy family " of mixed metaphor, un- 
grammatical language and lame construction, in which a literary 
Uarnuin would delight. In *• Sierra's Good-night to the Sun-God" 
we are given this expression : 

" Resplendant Sol! 
Most ancient giver of sweet shining life! " 
No comment on such rubbish is necessary. There is no excuse for 
such '* poetry." The voice which utters it might better be engaged 
in calling up the cows, or disputing with the tones of hungry pigs for 
a chance to be heard when darkness creeps over the earth. It is easy 
enough to imagine a half-witted fellow with sufficient dearth of judg- 
ment to write the stuff; but that such a house as the Bancrofts should 
semi it out with their imprint is beyond comprehension. 

White, Smith & Co., the well-known Boston music publishers, have 
recently issued the opera of " Said Pasha," that was given at the 
Tivoli Opera House some weeks ago in their popular list of operas. 
It is printed on good paper, with clear impression of both words and 
music. 

Constant twitching of the eye lids relieved by Muller, the leading Opti- 
nian, 135 Montgomery, near Bush, opposite the Occidental. 

SOUVENIR OF SAN FRANCISCO ! 

— _A.isr .A-Lzbttim: — 

PIPT "ST- T "W" O -A-RTOTYFIES 



"Artistic Homes of California." 

FAR SUPERIOR TO PHOTOGRAPHS. 



The Artotypes and descriptions are printed on heavy plate 
paper, making the work suitable for Library or Parlor Table 
This is the Most Elegant Souvenir ever produced on the Pacific 
Coast ; gives the most pleasing and accurate idea of San 
Francisco, and can always be referred to with interest and 
pleasure. 

FOR SALE AT OFFICE OF 

s b 1 . ictews letter, 

FLOOD BUILDING, 

Fourth and Market Streets, S F. 

SZEISTTD IT TO TOTJE PBIEUDS. 



Price— Bound in Card, $1.50; Cloth, $2.50; Half Morocco, $3.50. 
By Mail, 25 ceots extra. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

>le*S Home Sn\ 1 1 

lni- declared Its nemi annual divide I , and will be pi Id al their 

banking offlcoo on Market and Fourth .sir. 'ft-, luthe Plood Building, ou aud 
after January 2, iiwu; ordinary Deposit*, al tbe rate of l.gbpcrci 

anuum; Term Depot. I bi, hi the rate 6.10 per cent per an Btockhi 

at tbe rate of 6 per cent per annum, Ou all deposit! the percenta 
furthermore apportioned from date of deposit, tbe deposits thug bi 
Interest for the entire term of deposit 
J. K. WILSON, CO] r.Mius WATER HOUSE, 

Secretary and Cashier. [Dec. 29.] President 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Hibernla Savings and Loan Society. 
N. E. Comer Montgomery and Posl Bis,, 

San Francisco, January 2,1889. 
At ii regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this 
day, » dividend has been declared at the rate of i 1 , percent per annum op 
ail deposits for the six mouths ending December si, 1888, free <»f all taxes, 

and payable from ami after this date. 
Jan. ft. | ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union, 

532 California street, corner Webb. 

For the half year eudiug with tbe 31st of December, 1888, a Dividend ha 

been declared at the rate of five (o) per ceut. per annum on Term Deposits 

and four and one-sixth (4 1-0) per cent, per annum ou Ordinary Deposits, free 
of taxes, payable ou and after Wednesday, Jannarv 2, 1889. 
Dec 23. ] LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

526 California Street. 

For the half yearending December 81, 188s, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of five audoue-teuth {5 1-10) percent, per annum on Term Deposits 

aud four and one-fourth (4%) per ceut. per annum ou Ordiuary Deposits, 

payable on and after Wednesday, January 2, 1889. 

Dec. 29-1 GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society, 
Northwest Coruer of Powell and Eddy Streets. 
For the half year ending December 31, 1888, a dividend has bceu de- 
clared at the rate of five (5) per cent, per anuum on Term Deposits, aud 
four (4) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable 
on and after WEDNESDAY, January 2, 1889. 
Dec. 15.1 VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary, 

"dividendIotice. 

Savings and Loan Society, 

619 Clay Street. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1888, a dividend has been declared, 

at the rate of four and eighty one-huudredths (4 80-100) per cent, per annum, 

on all deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Wednesday, January 2, 

1889. 

Dec. 29.1 CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Pacific Bank 
has declared its regular semi-annual dividend, at the rate of eight per cent, 
per annum, ou the par value of the capital stock, and the same will be paid 
at its banking house, on the northwest coruer of Piue aud Sansome streets, 
San Francisco, on and after January 2, 1889. 
O. F. M1NKR, Secretary. |Dec. 2y.] R. H. McDONALD, President. 

DIVIDEND No. I GO. 

The Home Mutual Insurance Company 
Will pay its regular monthly dividend of one dollar ($1) per share upon its 
capital slock on January 10, 1889. 
j au . 12. | CHARLES R. STORY, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company. 

Dividend No. 12 (Thirty Cents per share) of the Hawaiian Commercial 

and Sugar Company, will be payable ou aud after FRIDAY, February 

1 1889 at the office of the Company, 327 Market street. Transfer books will 

Ci r^ d r JaU " nry 25th ' "' 3 * "' E. H. 8HELDON, Secretary. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Best & Belcher Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Virgiuia City, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is herebv given that at a meetiug of the Board of Directors, held 
on Thursday, the tenth (10th) day of January, 1889, au assessment (No, 42) 
of Twenty-five (25) Cents per i^diare was levied upou the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secre- 
tary, at the office of the Company, Room No. 29, Nevada Block, 309 Mont- 
gomery street, Sau Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

Friday, the Fifteenth (t 5th) day of February, 1889. will be delinquent, 

and advertised for sale at public auction; and uuless payment is made be- 
fore will be sold on THURSDAY, the seventh (7th) day of March, 1889, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors ne , n ^ n „^ 
v L. OSBORN, Secretary. 

Offite— Room 29, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, Sau Fran- 
cisco, California. [Jan. 12. 

J F Cutter's Old Bourbon.— This celebrated Whisky is for sale by all 
first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark— star within a shield. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO SEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 12, 1889. 



QUARANTINE PRACTICALLY ABOLISHED. 
Collector Hager hits practically abolished the quarantine laws of 
the State, He insists that his officers shall pass to and from infected 
ships and mingle with the people of this city without let or hind- 
rance. That inere maybe no mistake about his position we quote 
his exact words. He says, through the columns of a contemporary : 
"It is charged that the action of the inspectors, in coming ashore 
after being on an infected ship, is likely to disseminate the germs of 
di-ease. Whether it would or would not cuts no figure in the ques- 
tion. I maintain that we have a right to come and go as we please." 
As the inspectors come ashore to their meals and to sleep, and are 
meanwhile relieved by a fresh relay of officers who, when off duty, 
spend their time on shore, it will be seen that contact between our 
crowded streets and the dread disease is about as continuous as it 
well can be. So long as this practice lasts our quarantine laws are 
substantially rendered a dead letter. We do not believe that Collector 
Hager correctly interprets either the law or his duty. There is no 
higher right vested in a State than that of protecting its people from 
the incoming of infectious diseases. When a ship comes within the 
marine league she is, for legal purposes, within the State, and, when 
necessary for the preservation of health and life, she may, by author- 
ity of the State, be completely isolated from contact with persons 
from the shore, whether they be Government employees or private 
individuals. This power is inherent in the nature of the case. There 
can be no quarantine without it. Collector Hager, as is customary 
with him, mistakes his duty. If he thinks the City of Pefcin needs 
watching, it is bis duty to put a cordon of men around her, but at a 
safe distance. That is how Customs authorities manage such mat- 
ters in other parts of the world. In addition to looking out for 
smuggling they act as deputies to the quaratine officer by aiding him 
in every possible way, and especially by preventing any person leav- 
ing or going to the ship. But, then, what does Hager know about 
Custom usuages or quarantine necessities, or any other practical af- 
fairs of life, for the matter of that? When he insists upon his men 
passing to and fro as frequently as they do, he endangers them, him- 
self and the people of the whole city. Furthermore, he nullifies one 
of the most important laws within the power of a people to enact. 
But his latest folly is of a piece with his whole administration. He 
is the most impracticable old dotard that ever occupied an impor- 
tant office. 

The Pacific Phonograph Company, which holds a license for 
California. Nevada and Arizona, with an office at 323 Pine street, are 
overrun with curiosity seekers and prospective buyers. There is no 
question but that the phonograph will enter largely into business as 
well as social life in the future. It has been suggested that fewer 
wills could be broken if the one making the will would speak his 
directions and wishes into the phonograph, which would not only be 
conclusive as to his wishes, but would come as a voice from the grave 
to rebuke those who contemplated an attempt to break a will or not 
abide by the wishes of the deceased regarding the disposition of his 
property. The views to take of the phonograph are almost unlimited, 
ranging from the serious to the humorous phases of the question. 

At the Billiard Table.— Miss Gay (of Vassar)— Oh, what a horrid 
scratch! Lady Hilda (much shocked)— My dear, what a vulger ex- 
pression! Miss Gay— But what should I say? Lady Hilda — Why, 
beastly fluke, of course. Life. 

The Larcher and Moe School of Languages, located in the Flood 
Building in San Fraacisco, aud in Hamilton Hall iu Oakland, are deserv- 
edly popular local institutions, and deserve the great patronage they re- 
ceive. They employ only the best teachers and give thorough instruction 
at reasonable rates in French, German, Italian and Spanish. 

.1. M. Litchfield & Co., the nobby tailors, 12 Post street, are getting a 
reputation more than local for the superb quality of their clothes aud nice 
fits, while their prices are so reasonable that any man can appear dressed 
within the reasonable limits of fashion. 

Headache caused from defective sight relieved by Muller, the expert 
Dtieian. 13-5 Montgomery, near Bush. 



Optician, 13-5 Montgomery, near Bush 



COLD WEATHER GOODS! 



M. J. FLAVIN & CO. 

"A COLD SPELL!" 

We offer for the approaching cold aud rainy weather everything in the 
line of 

Cardigan Jackets, Overcoats, Woolen Under- 
wear, Rubber Clothing, Woolen Hosiery, 
Gloves and Woolen Overshirts, 

At Greatly Reduced Prices. 

M. J. Flavin & Co., 

924= TO 928 HVCJ^RICIET STBBET, 

THROUGH TO ELLIS. 
Illustrated Price List Free on application, with new calendar for 1889. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Nevada Queen Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of worts— Tuscarora Mining District, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 21st day of December, If 88, an assessment (No. 4) of Fifty Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to th> Secretary, at ihe office of the 
Company, room 52, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 28th day of January, 1889, will be delinquent, 
aud advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the 26th day of February, 1889, to pay the 
deliuquenl assessment, together with costs of advertising aud expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

HENRY DEAS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 52, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. [Dec. 29. 

"ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company, 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California; loca- 
tion of works— Silver Star Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
on the 27th day of December, 1888, an assessment (No. 3) of Twenty five 
Cents (25c) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, : 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the j 
office of the Company, room 09, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 31st Day of January, 1889, will b; delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction ; aud unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the 25th day of February, 1889, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with, costs of advertising aud ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79 Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fraa- 
cisco, California. . [Dec. 29. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Savage Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of Business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works — Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
on the 7th day of January, 1889, an assessment (No. 72) of Fifty Cents (50c) 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United states gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, room 4, Nevada Block, No. 3u9 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 11th day of February, 1889, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the 4th day of March, 1889, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 

Office— Room 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. fjan. 12. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



Union Consolidated Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works — Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 4th day of January, 1889, an assessment (No. 37) of Twenty-five 
Cents (25c) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, room 11, No. 303 California street, San Francisco, 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 8th day of February, 1889, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on FRIDAY, the 1st day of March, 1889, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. M. BUFFINGTON, Secretary. 

Office— Room 11, No. 303 California street, San Francisco, Cal. LJau. 12. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

North Belle Isle Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works — Tuscarora, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 3d day of January, 1889, an assessment (No. 14) of Fifty (50) 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, pay- 
able immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, &*. the office 
of the Company, No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 6th day of February, 1889, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 27th day of February, 188', to pay 
the delinqent assessment, together with costs of advertising aud-expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors- 

J. W. PEW, Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 aud 17, San Francisco, Cal. [Jan. 12. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



Gould & Curry Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment --No. 61 

Amount per Share '30 Cents 

Levied.. January 10, 1889 

Delinquent .n Office February 14, 1889 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock March 7, 1889 

. ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office- Room GJ, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. IJan. 12. 

Complete sets of Artotypes cau be had at the News Letter office, Flood 
Building, corner Market and Fourth streets. Price, ten cents each. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PA» mr system. 

Tr«in* L«av« nnd »r« Duo to A.rnv© mi 
SAN FRANCISCO: 



leavi | From December 8, lt>88. I 
jFor H»ywiuNU! Nllw ind 8anj 
JFor Saotmmeuto, aud (or Ked-f 
rllnei, Vallejo, Callsto ( 

j k'A ami Sauta Kos.a . t 

(For NiU>. 9ao Jom, Stockton,) 
] Ghdt [one, Bicrameuto,? 
i lUrysTllle and Bed Bluff > 
[hot AngoleaBxpraaa, for Pre*-] 

Bant* Barbara and LOS 



7;30a. 
7:80 a. I 
8:00 a. 

9:00 a. 

8:30 a. 

9.00 a. 
10:30 a. 
*L!-00h. 
•1:00 p. 

+2.00 P. 

3:00 p.: 

3:00 P. ! 
4:00p.i 
4:30 P. 
•4:30 p.] 
5:30, P.' 



f LOa Aimrli' 

( Angela*. 



[■*_•;■-> 



8:00 p.. 



Ka-t Mull forOgden and East 
Pot Haywarda and N 

Knr Muvwar.ls mid > 

Sacramento Blvet Steamers 
(Golden Gate Special, for 
| Council Bluffs and Beat 
| For Hay wards, SUea aud San 

/ Jose. " 

i Central Atlantic Express, for 

i Ogdeu aud East 

(For StOCklon and yMiltoii; for 

] Yallejo, Caliatoga aud San-, 

( ta Etoaa 

\ For S&cramcuto aud for 

( Knlght'a Lauding via Davis. 

[For Nile*, San Jose aud Liv- 

) ermore 

For Hay wards aud Nile* 
f Shasta Route Express, for 1 
I Saorameuto, Marysville, I 
Beddfng, Portlaud, Puget f 

L Round aud Ea&t — J 

: Sunset Koute, Atlautic Ex-" 
] pr t ->>. for Santa Barbara, Los 
I Angeles, Demtug, El Paso, 
[ Hew Orleaus aud East 



South Pacific Coast Railway Division. 



13 00 a. For Newark and Sau Jose 

.Fnr Newark, Center vi lie, Sain 
8:15a. < Jo&e, Felton, Boulder Creeks 
f and Santa Cruz J 

(For Ceuterville, San Jose, Fel-» 
•2:15 p.i < ton, Boulder Creek audj ^10:50 
I Sauta Cruz . .... .7 

...J (For Ceuterville, San Jose, Al-j q.oq 
«:iop.| | ma deu aud Los Gatos I 

Northern Division (Fourth and Townsend Sts). 



7:50 a, 



•5:00 p. 
6:30 p. 

+11:45 P. 



For Menlo Park and Way Stations 
(For Sau Jose, Gilroy, 'Ires'] 

Pinos, Pajaro, Sauta Cruz, 
! Monterey, Salinas. San Mi 
guel, Paso Kobles aud Tem- 
pletou (Sau Luis Obispo) 
and principal Way Stations. 
For San Jose, Almaden and 

Way Stations 

For Cemetery, Menlo Park) 

and VVav Statious. \ 

(For San Jose, Tres Piuos.i 
) Sauta Cruz, Monterey, aud/ 
( principal Way Statious. . ) 
JFor San Jose and principal/ 
J Way Stations ( 

For Menlo Park and Way Stations 
For Menlo Park and Way Statious 
\ For Menlo Park aud priucipal ( 
j Way Stations \ 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

WIT AND WISDOM. 

Mi>> iiuili ihIIv Jtt her father 

through the dlnitiK-room door) "Dear me! 
Hnw Bad Pa looks! To look at hi a . Mr, 
Rounder, you would never suspect him tu be 
full "f spirits, would * 

Mr. Bounder mtlih ally)— •• Well, no. not 
exact 1 j lull yet, but he wul be very shortly. " 

—Judge, 

li the internal griefs of every man could be 

read, written oh his forehead, now many who 

now excite envy WOuld appear In be the ob- 
jects of pity. —MeUutasio, 

Brown—" Bo your girl's father showed you 
the door?" Jones—" He did." Brown— 

■■ Bow did you reel over it?" Jones—" Well, 

I felt put out." —Boston ' burier. 

Queen Victoria has given up her sta^ln-muls 
in the Interest of economy.— Evening Post. 
We suppose ahe was afraid her wealth would 
go to the dogs. — i\'c" fork World, 

Where is the holiest place on earth? Where 
souls breathe l lie holiest vows and execute 
the most heroic purposes. — F. W. Robertson. 

We live by admiration, hope and love; 
And even as these are well and wisely fixed, 
In dignity of being we ascend. 

— Wordsworth. 

A timid person is frightened before a dan- 
ger, a coward at the time, and a courageous 
person afterwards. — Richter. 

In faith and hope the world will disagree, 
But all mankind's concern is Charity. 

— Pope. 

Truth is as impossible to be soiled by any 
outward touch as the sunbeam. 

—John Milton. 

There is no greater delight than to be con- 
scious of sincerity on self-examination. 

— Me lie ins. 

To hear with eyes is part of love's rare wit. 

—Shakespeare. 
For a man to exert his power in doing good 
so far as he can is a most glorious task. 

Sophocles. 

When power and justice unite, what stronger 
pair is there than this? — CEschyhts. 

That is the bitterest of all— to wear the yoke 
of your own wrong-doing. —George Eliot. 
30 p. Ensure equality, not by leveling the few 
but by elevating the many. — D' Israeli. 

We are shaped and fashioned by what we 
1:38 p. love. —Goethe. 



27 



ARRIVE 

•12:45 r. 

7:1'. ft 

6;16 r. 
5:45 P. 

U:15A. 

U 45 .1. 

2:16 ft 
"6:00 a. 
||9:45 r. 

9:45 a. 

8:15 A. 
10:15 a. 



•8:45 a. 
7:45 a 



t7:20p. 
5:50 P. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 

— AND— 

SONOMA VALLEY RAILROADS. 

"THE DONAHUE BROAD-GAUGE ROUTE. " 

COMMENCING S0NDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1 

until further notice, Boauj aud frail] 
Leave from aud arrive at tin- Ban Francisco Pa*- 
r Depot, MARKET-STREET WHARF, an 
follows: 



t7 



66 a 
;35a. 

4Up. 



a. for Morning. p. for Afternoon. 

•Sundays excepted. fSaturdays only. 

{Sundays only. ^Saturdays excepted. 

||Fridays only. **Mondays excepted. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST AND BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3 o'clock p. M., for YOKO- 
HAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at Yoko- 
hama with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Steamer. 1889. 

Arabic Thursday, January 24. 

Oceanic. Wednesday, February 13. 

Gaelic Saturday, March 2. 

Belgic Thursday, March 20. 

Arabic Saturday, April fi. 

Oceanic Tuesday, April 23. 

Gaelic. Saturday, May ll. 

Belgic Satu rda y, May 25. 

ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES. 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at the 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, or at 
No. 202 Market street ( Union Block) Sau Francisco. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 

GEO H.RICE, Traffic Manager. fjan. 12. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's Steamers will sail 
For New York via Panama, 
S. S. Acapulco .. Monday, Dec. 3rd, at 12 noon. 
Takiug Freight and Passengers direct for Mazat- 
lan, Acapulco, Champerico, Sau Jose de Guate- 
mala, Acajutla, La Libertad, Coriuto, Punta Are- 
nas and Panama. 

For Hongkong via Yokohama, 

S S. City of New York .Saturday, Dec. 29, at3P.M 
S.S- City of Peking Tuesday, Ja'u. 15, L8S0,at3 p.m. 

S. S. City of Sydney Monday, Feb. 4, at 3 p. m. 

8. S. City of Rio de Janeiro. .Feb. 21st, at 3 p. a. 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and return at 

reduced rate. 
For Freight or Passage apply at the Office, cor- 
ner First and Brannan streets. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

General Agents. 
Geo. H.Rice. Traffic Manager. [Jan. 12. 



LbavbS. F. 




Akkivk IN H. F. 


Week 

Days. 


Sundays 


Destination. 


Sundays 


Wftk 
Day.. 


7-.40 A.M.. 8:00 A.M. 
3:30 P.M. IS :00 p.m. 
5-.00P.M.I 


Petaluma 
aud 

Santa Khmi. 


10:40 A. M 
C.IOP.M 


8:50a.m. 
11:40a. m 
6:06p. m. 



Fulton 

Windsor, 
7:40a. m.|8:00a.m.| Healdslairg. 

p. m. Cloverdale & 

Way Statious. 



11:40a. m 
6:10p.m. 0:00p.m 



7:40A.M.l8:00A.M.lGuerneville. 6:10 p.m. 16 :05p.m. 



3:30p.m.jS:C0a.m. tT^uTlk-n' 1 |l«:«*-«- * "'" > "■ 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

Carrying U. S., Hawaiian and Colonial Mails. 

Will leave the Company's Wharf, foot of Steuart 
and Folsom streets, 

For Honolulu: 

S. S. AUSTRALIA (3,000 tons) . . Jan. 29, 1889, at 3 P. M 
Or immediately on arrival of the Eugllsh mails. 

For- Honolulu, Auckland and 
Sydney, Without Change: 
The Splendid New 3,000-tou Iron Steamer 
Zealandia Saturday, Jan. 12th, at 3 p. M 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar- 

k ' " JOHN D. SPKECKELS & BROS., 

IJan. 12. General Agents. 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for White Sulphur 
Springs, Sebastopol aud Mark West Springs; at 
Geyserville for Skaggs Spriugs, aud at Cloverdale 
for Highland Spriugs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, 
Lakeport, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Bartlett 
Springs, Ukiah, Vichy Spriugs, Navarro Ridge, 
Mendocino City and the Geysers. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days—To Petaluma, $1 75; to Santa Rosa, *3: to 
Healdshurg, $4: to Cloverdale, $5; to Sonoma, *1.50: 
to Glen Ellen, $2.25. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sunday only- 
To Petaluma, $1 50; to Santa Rosa, $2; to Healds- 
hurg, *3: to Cloverdale, $4 50; to Guerneville, (3; 
to Sonoma, $1; to Glen Ellen, $1.50. 

From Sau Francisco for Point Tiburon and San 
Rafael, Week Days— 7:40, 9:40 a. m. ; 3:30, 5:00, 615 
P.M. Sundays— 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 a.m.; 5:00 p. m. 

To San Francisco from San Rafael, Week Days— 
6:20, 7:55, 10:40 a. m. ; 3:40, 5:05 p. M. Sundays— 8:10, 
9:40 a.m.; 3:40, 5:00 p. M. 

To San Francisco from Point Tiburon, Week 
Days— 6:60, 8:20, 11:05 a. m. ; 4:05,5:30 P.M. Sun- 
days-8:40. 10:05 A. m. ; 4:05, 5:30 p. M. 

On Saturdays an extra trip will be made from 
Sau Francisco to San Rafael, leaving at 2:00 p. m. 
H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

General Supt. Gen. Pass, aud Tkt. Agt. 

TICKET OFFICES-At Ferry, 222 Montgomery 
Street and No. 2 New Montgomery Street. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: 

The steamers MEXICO and UMATILLA direct 
for VICTORIA, B. C, aud PL GET SOUND ports, 
at 9 a. m. every Friday. 

The steamer UMATILLA, sailing every other 
Friday, at 9 a. m., connects at Port Townsend 
with Steamers IDAHO and ANCON for Alaska. 

For PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with 
the O. R. AND N. CO., every four days. 

FOE SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, San 
Simeon, Cayucos, Port Harford, San Ldis Obis- 
po, Gaviota, Santa Barbara, San Buenaven- 
tura, Hueneme, San Pedro, Los Angeles and 
San Diego, about every second day. 

For EUREKA, ARCATA and HOOKTON, Hum- 
boldt Bay, Tuesday, at 9 a. m.— LOS ANGELES. 

FOR POINT ARENA, MENDOCINO, etc., everv 
Monday and Thursday, at 4 P. m. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 214 Montgomery street, 
Near Pine. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 

Sept. l.j No. 10 Market street, Sau Francisco. 



CUNARD LINE. 

NEW YORK to LIVERPOOL via QUEENSTOWN. 
From Pier 40. North River— Fast Express Mail Service. 



Bothnia. Jan. 12, 2:30p.m. 
Gallia.. Jan. 19, 6:30 A.M. 

Servia Jan. 26, 1 p.m. 

Etruria. .Feb. 2, 6 :30 a.m. 



Aurania. Feb. 9. noon. 
Umbria Feb.l6,5:30A.M. 
Servia.. Feb. 23, noon. 
Emiria..Mar. 2 5:30 A.M. 



Cabin passage, $60, ?R0 aud J100; intermediate, 
$33. Steerage tickets to and from all parts of 
Europe at very low rates. 

Fnr freight aud passage apply to the Company's 
offices, 4 Bowling Green, New York, 

VEKNON H. BROWN & CO., General Agents. 

Good accommodations can always be secured on 
application to WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., Agents 
Sau Francisco. fJan. 1:. 

Yon can live nt homo qtiiI mnkc more money ni work Tot ue 

j Hum at rinvtliiiiR olBo in tbc world. Either em ; nil uecs. CosU 

lyuutiii i 1:1.1-. Terms *"KEK. Address, TBUE& Co., Augusta, Muino. 



bold,: 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 12, 1889. 




MORE utter nonsense has seldom been written than the attack 
on Sir Robert Morier, first made in the Kolnische Zeitung on 
the strength of an apparently official communication from 
Berlin. If the able British "Ambassador at St. Petersburg 
is anything, he is " German " to the backbone— that is, after 
his duty to his own country. Until some twelve years ago, when he 
was appointed Minister at Lisbon, he had passed nearly the whole of 
his twenty-two years' service at one or other port in Germany, and it 
was said of him, by the late Count Beust, that he understood Ger- 
many better than he did himself. It is perfectly true that he held 
similar views as to German politics to those entertained by the late 
Emperor Frederick, which is quite enough to account for his rejec- 
tion by Prince Bismarck when proposed by Lord Granville as Am- 
bassador at Berlin to succeed Lord Amptbill four years ago. The 
suggestion that he was in any way in communication with Bazaine 
during the Franco-German war is, on the face of it, so preposterous, 
that we should have hardly thought it worth his taking any notice of 
such a ridiculous charge. As a matter of fact, Sir R. Morier, at that 
time being charg6 d'affaires at Darmstadt, undertook a charitable 
mission to Strasburg to minister to the wants of the German sick and 
wounded. The Tagblatt says that the Bismarcks are really attacking 
England, not Morier, and that they are ready to go the length of 
seeking an alliance with Russia if, by those means, this can, in any 
way, ruin England's world-wide position. 

But the Morier-Bazaine incident has been quite eclipsed by the re- 
lease of Professor Geffcken from durance vile, and it is quite gratify- 
ing to have proof that the German judges constituting the imperial 
tribune have shown sufficient independence to decline to proceed 
against the Doctor, finding it impossible to prove that he was con- 
scious of the so-called treasonable character of his publication of the 
late Emperor's diary. Prince Bismarck's report to the Emperor 
William, which led to the arrest of Dr. Geffcken, is said to have been 
to accomplish the discovery of the intrigues of those who were en- 
deavoring to dethrone him as Chancellor, and for which Geffcken 
allowed himself to be made use of. The court held thatalthough the 
initial inquiry showed sufficient reason for assuming Geffcken had 
published information which it was necessary for the interest of 
Germany to conceal from foreign countries, the evidence was not 
enough to show that he was aware of the nature of his revelations. 
All this hubbub about " High treason," "State secrets," etc., has 
ended in the discomfiture of the " Man of Iron," as it ought, and it 
is hailed by the German liberal journals as the moral defeat of Bis- 
marck. The mass of the German people seem all along to have dis- 
approved of the government tactics in the Geffcken affair, and now 
that the Professor is free after his three months' imprisonment at 
Leipsie, it will be interesting to watch whether the Master of Germany 
will vent his rage in some other direction— being now stripped of the 
glamour as the founder of German unity— or preserve a dignified 
silence for the future. 

The East African blockade, if it does nothing more, will give those 
who are engaged in it, an excellent opportunity of making a study of 
the navigation of the coast. Already nearly all the German ships 
and the one only Italian vessel engaged have contrived to touch 
ground, without, however, any serious results, and one of the British 
ships has at present followed their example. In the interior the 
natives appear to be engaged in the work of mutual extermination, 
which, if allowed to continue very much longer, will end in leaving 
no customers to trade with. This fiasco of the Germans in East 
Africa, and their colony in New Guinea being apparently on its last 
legs, and now the report of their last mishap in Samoa, may perhaps 
induce the people in Berlin to the conclusion that it would be better 
for them to retire from a business they do not understand and turn 
the whole over to John Bull, who is quietly pursuing the even tenor 
of his way in the adjoining territory, both in Africa and New Guinea, 
as if such a thing as " risings " among the natives were an unknown 
quantity. Our Teutonic brothers are finding that their " zum teuffel '' 
and " donnerwetter " principle will not work in the endeavor to sub- 
jugate semi-civilized races. A little of the " saavite> in modo " at the 
commencement, followed up by the " fortit^r in re" at the right 
moment, would be more advantageous. 

The Paris correspondent of the Times, writing recently to that 
journal, says it is impossible to deny that the whole domestic policy 
of France at the present moment turns round one question, and that 
is the Boulanger one. It is with regard to this that parties struggle. 
It controls all combinations, guides all movements, inspires all polit- 
ical strategy. One result of it is to combine political parties to divide 
France into two great hostile camps— the Boulangists and anti-Bou- 
langists. The country is certainly in the main opposed to those who 
now govern it in the name of the Republic; but from that it is not to 
be inferred that France is, as had been said, disgusted with the Re- 



public, but with the men who represent it. and that General Boulanger 
can only come before the electors under the Republican banner. In 
whatever way he comes before the electors, i bere seems now to he a 
pretty general consensus of opinion that he will be the chosen one. 
M. Jules Simon, a cool, conservative Republican, quite recently de- 
clared his belief that Boulanger would be successful, and it is now 
rumored that De Freycinet. foreseeing the certainty of Bouhinger's 
election, is trying to arrange with him regarding the composition of 
the next Ministry. If Boulanger is elected to the Chamber by the 
Department of the Seine, which appears most likely, and makes no 
mistakes before the general elections, which take place this year, 
there is but little doubt but that the " Hero of the Black Charger" 
will be the successor of quiet M. Carnot. 

In reference to the Parnell Commission.it is said that both the 
leading counsel for Mr. Parnell are heavy pecuniary losers, as, of 
course, no private business finds its way to them. It is whimpered 
that as the Parnell fund is very nearly exhausted, that after the re- 
assembling of the Commission there may arrive the necessity of the 
retirement of Sir Charles Russell and Mr. Lockwood as counsel for 
the Home Rulers, in the event of which it is presumed that each of 
the defendants would be entitled to put in an appearance as his own 
advocate. At the coming sitting, after the Xmas recess, it is stated 
tbat some damaging testimony will be brought forward by the Times, 
probably in connection with that gained by the Scotland Yard de- 
tectives during their recent visit to America. It is, however, when 
the American portion of the case conies on for hearing, that the real 
interest in the trial will commence. The amount subscribed to the 
Parnell indemnity fund from this coast, we notice, is^about $1,700, 
and the list is now closed and the sum remitted. 

It has been stated by some of the Nationalist organs that the Pope 
has advocated Home Rule for Ireland, but. in refutation of this, the 
Whitehall Review, a good authority, says : We feel sure that his Holi- 
ness has, at no time, done so, and that Leo XIII. would at once 
allow that the question did not come within the province or sphere of 
Papal authority. With "the care of all the churches" upon his 
shoulders, the Pope can hardly trouble himself as to the existence or 
non-existence of two or three Parliaments instead of one in the Brit- 
ish Isles. The Pope knows that, years ago, when such transactions 
were recognized by the Nations, one of his predecessors gave Ireland 
to England, and it is a matter for England, and England only, to de- 
cide how Ireland shall be governed. In 188G the English people 
resolved that Ireland shall not have Home Rule. At the next general 
election, the English people may change their minds. And if the 
people do this, they must then take the consequences. The sequel 
will be broken heads, bloodshed, civil war, the ruin of Ireland com- 
mercially and her reconquest by the greater country. 

Death of the British Vice Consul.— Charles Mason, British Vice 
Consul, had a stroke of apoplexy on Tuesday, from which he died 
early in the evening. Mr. Mason was a native of Ireland, where he 
was born about fifty years ago, and came to San Francisco in 18(i2, 
and soon after went to British Columbia, but in a short time returned 
here. He acted as Vice Consul and Consul on different occasions 
prior to 1883, in which latter year he was appointed regularly, and 
has rilled the office since. Mr. Mason was well known and highly es- 
teemed in commercial circles. He left a wife and three children, who 
left for a prolonged visit to England, via Panama, only a few days 
before his sickness, and consequently are on the sea in ignorance of 
the sad event. Funeral services were held at Christ Church, Sausa- 
lito, yesterday morning, after which the remains were interred in the 1 
San Rafael Cemetery, 

Another Pioneer Gone.— Louis Adolph Pavillier, a pioneer, who 
came to San Francisco from New Orleans in 1849, died last Tuesday, 
much regretted by a large social and business circle, he being one of 
our best known and most generous French citizens. When he reached 
San Francisco he invested his capital in the banking house of Pioche 
A Bayerque, where he was a valued assistant, and aided largely in 
giving the house its stanping. But after a time he retired from this 
establishment and entered the house of De Fremery, at that time 
the leading house in importing French liquors, where his judgment; 
of liquors and his business tact made him an invaluable assistant. 
He leaves a wife and one daughter, Mrs. Alfred Perrier. 



Golden Gate avenue is a positive disgrace to the city. It is the 
only street exclusively for carriages leading direct to the Park, and 
is paved with bituminous rock, but over this paving the mud is sev- ' 
eral inches deep nearly its entire length. To remove this, going over 
it the entire distance with a road scraper and carting away the mud, 
would not cost fifty dollars. Once cleaned, it should, with proper 
management, be the easiest street in the city to keep in order. We 
bope that Mr. Max Popper will see to and remedy the condition of 
the avenue at once. 

Heald's Business College, one of the best institutions of the kind, 
not only in the city, but in the entire country, is enjoying a remark- 
able degree of prosperity. The list of graduates for the year just 
closed comprises a large number of young people from all parts of 
this State and the States and Territories adjoining. Its shorthand, 
type-writing and telegraphic departments show a small army of 
young women ready equipped for business life. 



Vol. XXXIX 




(ESTABLISHED 1 80S ] 

LA 



Numbtr 31 



ETTER 



(f alifornia A&bxrtiscr. 



DCVDTIO TO TNI LCAUNO l*TI«tT« OT CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 

'.'. found »n file in all the leading JSfr 
authority <>n 

stocks— a U Pa. uitr Coast JiftutttrU-s 

-.--■«. 

rid tkt Nrws l.rmr.R long shirr attained a front place, 
ami it* column* or,- eontimuoutlu quoted from by papers ecaUeredover tin: 
entire habilablt globe. 
ti 'tu Advi rHun.j Medium, it" bir,<,- circulation nnil influential position make 
\rluv9cJuL 

Frintnt and PubUshtd every S Proprietor, FREDERICK MARRIOTT, 

' Building, Fourth and Market strrrt.*, San Francisco. Annual Sub- 
scription, including P»*tn ■■■■'..* and Canada, $5; Foreign, $6. 
Registered at U ■>, California, as second-class matter. 

SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 1889. 



FINANCIAL REVIEW. 

rr*T7 LTHOUOH business in mine* is generally good in London, 
/ \ California properties are going a-begging. A prominent 
E"j capitalist of this city informs the Nkws Letter that within 
-i_ _L the past two month-; ho has. through his agent in England, 
offered a valuable mine, with a forty-stamp mill in operation, 
with the understanding that ine purchasers have six months or a 
year to test the property before closing the sale, and had the greatest 
difficulty in obtaining even a hearing. The reputation of the State 
has- suffered to such an extent, through the operations of an un- 
principled ring, that pe iple want to drop through a trap-door when 
tin* name of California is mentioned in connection with any mining 
venture. For years past our practical and reliable mining men have 
bad to give way before the advances of a set of unscrupulous vagrants, 
who are enabled to travel round and pose as mining magnates on the 
spoils raked in from petty larceny deals. The mining industry has 
been completely at the mercy of these itinerant fakirs. Capital has 
been driven from the State ami same of the best properties'wrecked 
under the swindling manipulation of schemers. Their sole capital is 
bjmbastic talk of influential connections abroad. The sooner our 
people cut adrift from this class of operators the better it will be for 
themselves. A syndicate of mine owners should be formed in this 
city to negotiate for working capital or the sale of mines abroad. 
Tuere is plenty of money in London which would be invested here 
provided confidence was restored. This end wilt never be attained 
until all the nanips of slimy individuals are blotted from the roster 
of mining experts and company promoters. The Chronicle, in a re- 
cent editorial on the injury which our credit has suffered abroad from 
mining swindles, says ; "'California owes these sharps a large debt of 
ingratitude, and nothing would do more to assist in reviving our min- 
ing industries than to have a black list of these men, with a circum- 
stantial accouut of the swindles in which they have taken part, and 
to have it posted in every large city, as a warning to those who desire 
to invest in mining property on the Pacific Coast. 

A correspondent of the New York Engineering and Mining Journal, 
criticising the London prospectus relating to the sale of the great 
14 Negociacion La Luz," in the State of Jalisco, Mexico, which em- 
braces the grand old Zapopan Mine, takes occasion to say that the 
Mexican miners ''can obtain, by their methods of treatment (of ores), 
as good, and oftentimes better, results than the foreigner with im- 
proved machinery." This remark is a truism under one set of cir- 
cumstances and a simple betise under others. That Mexican miners 
can " oftentimes " get better results in the patio than can be got with 
pans, for example, depends on the docility of the ore. But did this 
correspondent never hear of treatment by lixiviation, for example, of 
ores that are intractable to patio reduction? Or perhaps he does not 
count a lixiviation train as •' improved machinery." Did he ever hear 
o: the Fru2-Vanner or any other improved concentrator? Or is a, 
concentrator, in his view, not '• machinery? " Does the sapient cor- 
respondent not know of any mines in Mexico that are giving fine 
returns by aid of this apparatus, which, without it, could not be 
worked at all ? Or, if he does not know this, does the correspondent 
know, anything? Seeemingly, he does not. Seemingly. 

The friends of Mr. Ross Browne in this city are highly incensed at 
the unwarranted slur H. Smith Jr., cast upon him at the recent meet- 
ing of the Josephine Company in London. It is generally understood 
here that Mr. Browne's original report was grossly exaggerated after 
it had left his hands, the estimated value of the mine being raised 
from $100,000 to $300,000. Perhaps Mr. Smith can explain this pecu- 
liar circumstance. He might also state for the benefit of the unfortu- 
nate shareholders why he permitted, in the first instance, the vendor 
of the mine to have the appointment of the expert, on whose report 
the mine was to be accepted in London. Also, why the vendor was 
permitted to appoint the Superintendent of the company's prop- 
erty. Mr. Gillette was, we are informed, the owner of the property, and 
at the same time a member of the London Exploration Company, 
and an associate of Mr. Hamilton Smith in its management. Mr. 
Gillette suggests the purchase of this mine to Mr. Smith, the London 
manager of the exploration company, and Mr. Smith acquiesces. Mr. 



Gillette ; Mr Browne be selected In London n- Lbeejipert, 

ami Mr. Ninth is nggreeable. Then Mr. Smith takes the report, 
which, according to the inf. rotation received by us, was immediately 
Improved upon, and Introduces Lhe mine t" his circle «>f aasoi 
as a stunner. Can Mr. Smith deny this statement ol facta? El not, 
why should be now try to make a scape goal ol ttosa Browne 1 

The Com stock market has been quirt and steady during the week. 
Bullion shipments come along steadily from the hading mines, and 
mil ve preparations are going on at the bo nth end towards starting up 
some of the smaller mines which have lain Idle for years. Tha tiutro 
Tunnel sale has taken place, the I'ni.m Trust Company <-f N,. w York 
being the purchasers for $1,325,000. Con. Virginia paid the regular 
monthly dividend ol fifty cents on the Kith. The Tuscan. ra- were 
strong and active, notably Grand Prize, Commonwealth and Nevada 
Queen. The near approach of the season when milling operations 
will be in full swing will naturally be followed by hardening pi 
Some of these shares have even yet to be quoted at anything like I Be 
intrinsic value of the properties, and probably will not until the new 
works are all completed, and dividends are CJining along with regu- 
larity from three or four of the leading mines. Stronger prices may . 
however, now be expected in these shares. 

The Quijotoas have been weak, although the information from the 
mines is very satisfactory. The decline is brought about by inside 
manipulators, and a sharp reaction may be expected before long. 

The London Exploration Company are now figuring on a mine be- 
longing to the Beserra Brothers, located at Batopilas, in Chihuahua. 
Mexico. It is within twenty miles of Boss Shepard's mine, and is 
valued at$SOO,000 by the present owners. If the company concludes 
to invest, it is to be hoped the mine will turn out more profitable than , 
the Josephine. 

The Mayflower Mine has just shipped 021 ounces of gold, valued at ! 
$11,500, the result of thirteen days' run. 

Wells, Fargo & Co. 'a circular exhibit of the precious metal product. 
of the United States, British Columbia and Mexico for the year 1688, 
shows a gross amount of $114,431,592, divided as follows: Gold, $30,- 
4d8,052; silver, $51,348,420; copper, $18,261,400; lead, $11,263,630 The 
exports of silver during the past year to Japan, China, the Straits, 
etc., from San Francisco, amounted to $14,021,431. The production 
last year was more than double what it was in 1870, a very gratifying 
fact, and one which speaks well for the great West as a precious 
metal producer. 

We are pleased to note that Mr. Marks, the well-known editor of | 
the London Financial News, who has been dangerously ill, is now ! 
sufficiently recovered to attend to business. 

THE COST OF RUNNING THINGS. 
The Shepherd is at Sacramento feeding his Iambs. Et promises 
to be a wonderful session. There are, at least, two attaches for every I 
legislator. Junketing trips to visit the State institutions have already i 
commenced, and Heaven only knows what will happen between this ; 
and the sixth of March. The last session cost the State the extraor- 
dinary sum of $103,000. How much it cost the cmched ones will j 
probably never be known. The details of the large sum audited bv ; 
the Comptroller are in our possession, and, if closely criticised, would ', 
afford some curious glimpses into things. The little jobs were many 
and contemptible. Pretty nearly everybody around the Legislature, 
including attaches, lobbyists, newspaper correspondents, mem- 
ber's relatives, and even member's female friends were allowed, 
under color of law, to get their hands into the public Treasury. They 
must have got away with pretty nearly seventy thousand dollars ille- 
gitimately. An ordinary session ought not to cost more than $90,000. 
The per diem of all the members, at $8 per day for sixty days, is 
$53,000. The salaries of the attaches and contingent expenses would 
be liberally provided for by an appropriation of $30,400. Yet the last 
session cost $73,000 more than those combined sums, nearly every ( 
dime of which was squandered in ways more easily imagined than 
described. And, as if all this were not enough, it is said that the ex- j 
penses of the present session will far exceed those of the last. The | 
present indications surely point that wa?. Each succeeding session ; 
is worse than its predecessor. Members of both parties alike go in ; 
for their share of this lavish and corrupt expenditure. He is an un- 
popular man around the Legislature, no matter which party he 
belongs to, who says these things are true. Before the session is 
over we may be tempted to show in detail just how true they are. 

The Committee on Health and Police, to whom the petition for | 
the appointment of Mr. Davis, President of the Society for the Pre- ] 
vent ion of Cruelty to Animals, for the position of Poundkeeper was f 
referred, reported the petition back to the Board as a Committee of 
the Whole, without recommendation. This looks bad for the dogs, 
However, as 11,000 prominent people, irrespective of party, signed , 
the petition, it shows on its face the sentimentagainst Lindo's crneltv 
is so great that no party can afford to ignore it, for we believe 50,000| 
voters will make it a personal fight at the next election. 

The Auto-Pneumatic Car Motor Company have given a con- 
tract to llix & Firth for a complete thirty-foot car, with a seating 
capacity for sixty people, which will be ready for use in two months. 
Several car companies are ready to adopt it if it is successful, and are 
delaying construction until they ascertain the result. The simplicity 
I of the working and the success of the model were such as to lead us, 
' to believe that the full-size car cannot be otherwise than entirely 
I successful. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 19, 1889. 



INSURANCE WAR. 

The rather senseless war agamyt the present system of fire insur- 
ance goes merrily on, although up to the present time the stage has 
not yet been reached where the motives leading to the attack dis- 
close themselves. These can only be imagined, yet it is quite a safe 
guess to say that the newspaper which appears to be engineering the 
affair is not animated by any but " business " motives. It has never 
acknowledged that the interests of the general public would at any 
time be other than those which were best for its cash drawer. Under 
such circumstances it is not strange that a persistent effort is now be- 
ing made to represent the Pacific Insurance Union in a light differ- 
ent from what it is in fact. In truth it is neither a trust nor a monop- 
oly, for it is simply in the nature of an insurance clearing house, 
combining at the same time some of the features of a mercantile 
agency, so far as classification of risks is concerned. Before the 
Union was organized each insurance company classified the build- 
ings of a city where it did business in its own manner and at its own 
expense. Since the Union was organized all this work is done by 
the latter, of course at a vast saving to the companies. The Union 
issues the charts or maps to each company, showing the condition 
and nature of each building in relation to its rating of risk, and at 
the same time fixing the rate of insurance. Further than this it does 
not go. If it is said that it prevents competition, the answer 'u that 
in such a case the establishment of the American Kxperience tables, 
used by all life insurance companies, also prevent competition. 

The fact, however, remains that insurance can hardly be called a 
commercial commodity in the light of supply and demand, and its 
rates ought, in common sense, not to be regulated thereby. In a city 
like San Francisco, it is far more in the nature of a game of chance, 
where the odds cannot be calculated so far as the probabilities of a 
general conflagration are concerned. Nevertheless, the present rates 
are based entirely upon the losses incurred, with little or no account 
taken of the probability of a fire that might consume the entire city, 
and which would necessarily, should it occur, consume a great many 
of the insurance companies doing business in this city of wood. It, 
then, may well be said that a company doing business here practi- 
cally risks the payment not only of a smaller loss here and there, but 
of a general loss, which may seriously impair its resources. To say 
that under such conditions, where a calculation of the chances in- 
curred is, in the very nature of things, impossible, a rating which 
does not produce more than a fair rate of interest upon the capital 
invested is exorbitant, is saying something without right or reason. 
In at least one case — that of the Western Insurance Company — these 
so-called high rates were not sufficient to keep tke company alive. 
It is true that before the organization of the union there was compe- 
tition and that rates were low, but it is also to be remembered that 
then it was a competition to pay the least amount of money for prac- 
tically no returns in the way of insurance. And if the Insurance 
Union had performed no other services than that of weeding out 
weak companies that never paid a loss unless than at the end of a 
lawsuit, it is entitled to the thanks of the community. Under the 
circumstances, it is not strange that the enemies of the union should 
have recourse to manufactured interviews in order to rouse prejudice 
and create feeling against it. 

CALIFORNIA WINE. 
The State Viticultural Commission have opened new headquar- 
ters in Piatt's Hall, where all that can be done to advance the wine 
interests of California will be furthered. On the right are the offices 
of Clarence A. Wetmore and the other officers, while to the left is a 
cafe, where luncheon can be eaten and wines sampled of the make of 
any producer exhibiting them, which is sold at a merely nominal 
price and of guaranteed purity. The Commission reserve the right 
to have a chemical analysis of the wine made at any time, and any 
maker being caught in adulteration will be debarred" from exhibiting 
in future. This move on the part of the Commission is a most com- 
mendable one, and we hope to see it pushed to fulfillment— that of 
introducing native wine to universal use. We hope soon, also, to see 
the native wines on the tables of the leading hotels at prices of rea- 
sonable profit. Good California wines can be procured at fifty cents 
a gallon, and this will make five bottles, thus bringing the cost down 
to ten cents. Why the hotels should charge from $1 to $2 a bottle for 
this, and thus really discourage our native industry to the immediate 
lining of their own pockets, but to their injury in the end, is past 
comprehension. It is killing the goose that lays the golden egg. Let 
us have a little more long vision and fewer long ears. Such Califor- 
nians are the worst enemies of California growth. Let us have less 
of it. Our wines are becoming popular in Mexico and other foreign 
countries. Why not make them popular at home? 

Another Pioneer (ione. — Henry S. Casanova, who was born in 
Italy in 1837, and came to the coast in 1850, at the age of thirteen 
died of heart disease on Monday at his residence, 418 Post street. He 
located in Calavaras County on his arrival, but in 1859 came to San 
Francisco and entered into partnership with his uncle, F. Daneri, in 
the wholesale grocery business, and during the past fifteen years has 
been the representative of the firm here, his uncle having returned to 
Europe in 1874. Mr. Casanova was well and favorably known by 
everybody; was President of the Italian Chamber of Commerce, of 
the Italian colony at Cloverdale, and of the Italian Benevolent So- 
ciety. He was at one time President of the Olympic Club, and at his 
death was a prominent member of that institution. 



Tito 



JoEt&^oiI 

Pacific Coast Agents : 

Sherwood & Sherwood, 

212-214 Market Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. [Dec 8 

PERRIER-JOUET & Cie. 



We have just received direct from France, per steamer via New Orleans, 
our first shipment of this justly celebrated Wine, which we now offer for 
sale to the Trade at the lowest market rates. 

RESERVE CUVEE, 



Finest Extra Quality, 

Extra Dry, 
Pale Dry, 



\ PINTS AND QUARTS. 



do 



do 



July 21.1 



BLUM, BALDWIN & GIRVIN, 

Importers, 

307 California Street, S. F. 



ARMAND CAILLEAU, 

Leading Cloak and Suit House 



OF SAN FRANCISCO, 



48 GEARY STREET. 



Corner Grant Avenue. 



Mr. Cailleau is unw exhibiting the finest of European goods and of the 
latest patterns, selected by himself while abroad. 

ULSTERS, WRAPS, JACKETS, 

TEA GOWNS, ETC. 

SEALETTE BY THE YARD, THE CHEAPEST IN THE CITY. 

W Special care given to country customers. [Sept. 29. 

BAY DISTRICT ASSOCIATION. 

EACES! IK. -A. C !E S I 

DNDER, BLO0D-HOBSE RULES. 

Saturday January 19, 1889, at 2:30 P. M. 

FIRST RACE-5^-Mile heats. Sleepy Dick, 115 lbs; Minnie R, 110 lbs- 
Jack Brady. 110 lbs. 

SECOND KACE-1M6 mile heats. Oro, 110 lbs; Kildare, 110 lbs; Minnie 
B, 90 lbs; Baruey G, 110 lbs. 

RACES, RAIN OR SHINE. 

Admission, One Dollar. 

Jan. 19.J T. W. HINCHMAN, Manager. 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medal, Paris, 1878. 
gtf These Pens are " the best in the world." Sole Agent for the United 
States, MR. HY. HOE, 91 John St., N. Y. Sold by all Stationers. 



.Tan. !!>, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKR. 



B 




E have been having n taste <>f our Mr-t 
nai Winter weather this week. The 
have been snow-Uke, and eaf> 
ceptiogdurinfc the raid-hours of tin' 
day the air has been ■• nipping " to a 
degree, and no mistake about it. But how beautiful those 
mid-day hours have been it would take a stronger pen than 
mine to tell. Truly are Winter days BDCfa as these sufficient to com- 
penaate i«>r much we hnYetoendureduringourwindy.duaty Summer 

months. 

An effort is being made to revive the gaiety which seemed to cul- 
minate during the holiday week. lor it has been very quiet, not t<> -say 
dull ever rioOfl the new year dawned upon us. The first really large 
event in the dancing world was the Bachelors' Club gathering, on 
Friday night of last week, when another success was scored. The 
cotillion was danced under the leadership of Mr. Geo. Ncwhall. who 
bad requested the ladies participating in it to wear costumes of pink 
or white, and chose those colors to predominate in the decorations of 
the ball and supper rooms. The majority of the ladies acquiesced in 
this request, and appeared in the prevailing tints, which to my eye— 
and many others, as so expressed — while producing a pretty effect 
for one Hgure. gave a sameness and monotony to the general ensont^h, 
especially in thope figures like the wiudmill, when a combination of 
color would have made a harmonizing whole. The dra pings of pink 
and white tulle suspended from the chandeliers to the galleries, were 
prettily relieved by tints of green between the loopings. The stage 
was also decorated with ferns and shrubs, while the halls and door- 
ways were hung with white and draped with pink. Several of the 
figures danced were new ; one, where the gentlemen held pink gauze 
umbrellas over their partners' heads while dancing the five-step polka, 
caused a good deal of merriment from the lookers-on, as the different 
styles of dancing made the bobbing up and down, sideways and for- 
ward of the umbrellas amusing to a degree. The ladies were de- 
lighted with this figure, and each bore away her trophy to swell the 
number of " cotillion relics " in her own particular sanctum. It was 
also amusing to watch the expression of different faces in the wheel 
figure. When Mr. Newhall touched a spring in the pole, dancers 
who held opposite ends of ribbons depending from it found who was 
their rii-a-via and partner. In some cases it was one of decided 
chagrin. The supper, as usual, was elaborate. 

The French residents may be congratulated upon the brilliancy of 
the ball given by the French Club (Circle Frangais) on Saturday even- 
ing in honor of the opening of their new quarters in the building adjoin- 
ing Union Square Hall. The suite of rooms used by the club were 
thrown open, and Union Square Hall used for a ballroom. Ballenberg 
furnished the music, the decorations were in good taste and the sup- 
per delicious. The ladies were costumed, in the majority of instances, 
with the exquisite taste which has made that nation pre-eminent, 
among the most noticeable being Madames E. Jlaas, D. Roth, F. 
Koenig, E. G. Lyons, Jules Mayer and Olarovsky. Mr. Raphael 
Weil was seemingly ubiquitous, here, there and everywhere, on hos- 
pitable thoughts intent, seeing to the entertainment and comfort of 
the guests, in which amiable endeavor he was ably seconded by the 
members of the club, who have every reason to feel gratified at the 
success of the reunion. 

The society event of the present week was the theatrical entertain- 
ment given at Mrs. Goad's on Tuesday evening. It has been known 
for some time past that Mr. Eberle was drilling a number of our 
most talented amateurs in a play, the name of which was kept a 
strict secret until the invitations to see it performed were actually 
out ; and , well as several of the participants had acquitted themselves 
on other occasions, the greatest curiosity was felt as to how they 
would succeed in such an ambitious undertaking as Esmeralda. As 
a consequence, regrets were few, and every seat was filled in the tem- 
porary theater into which the billiard-room was transformed. It was 
fully nine o'clock ere the curtain rose, and after the first natural 
nervousness wore off, the players did themselves and their instructor 
full justice, and a decided success was scored by nearly the whole of 
the cast. Mrs. Robinson and Mr. Hugh Tevis, however, seemed to 
carry off the honors of the evening. One of the scenes particularly 
well done was that between Nora Desmond (Mrs. Robinson) and 
Esterbrook (Lieutenant Sturgis), and another the reunion of the 
parted lovers, Esmeralda and Dave Hardy. Mr. Greena'way made a 
jolly artist, and was the recipient of many compliments. Between 
the acts promenading, chatting, ices, etc., were indulged in, which 
served to greatly lighten the tedium of the long waits. Supper was 
served on the conclusion of the piece, the players receiving the con- 
gratulations of their audience with modesty, while themselves giving 
to the inner man the support so richly earned— and needed. Dancing 
followed in the music-room and parlors, and was kept up with un- 
flagging zeal for several hours. 

The. Presidio was looking its best on Wednesday afternoon, the 
time chosen for the reception given by the officers at that Post in 



honor ol General and Mrs. Miles. The day was bright and beat 11, 

with just enough frosi in I he mr ti> rmder it niosl Envtgoratlfl 

while many drove nut there in tbelr own v< hides, othei ch titber 

of the two lines ol rare as a means oi transportation from the city, 
The hop-room, in wbloh the reception was held, was beautifully 
decorated with Hags, bunting, sabres and small arms, garlai 
greens, bright berries and smflax, and was brightly lighted with 

lamps. It 1 1 resenti d a most brilliant appearance When the Hour was 
tilled with dancers, and the conservatory . which was used as a " con- 
versation corner," was b1B0 made beautiful wilh red and white 
draperies, [lowers j, nd greens in ^rcat profusion, while the promen- 
ade hung with Hugs and Japanese lanterns, and the punch-room, 

over which Mr. Waller presided, both served to keep the larger ro 

Erom being uncomfortably crowded. The refreshment buffet was 
under the charge of i\ group of charming young ladies, who dispensed 
the viands with modesty and grace. The reception was a delightful 
one from first to la-l. and will long be remembered as one of the most 
enjoyable affairs of this Winter's season. 

Last evening the Edaia Clob bad its usual monthly cotillion party 
at Union Square Hall, and in the same hall, on the 28th, will take 
place the army and navy cotillion of the German Club. The officers 
will all appear in full dress uniform, and the ladies are requested to 
wear one of the three national colors— red, white or blue. Some new 
figures are promised, and the party is looked forward to with curi- 
osity, pleasure and impatience. 

Another pleasant gathering of the future will be the Ladies' Night 
at the Olympic Club rooms, which will be given on Wednesday even- 
ing of next week, the programme consisting of a lecture on Olympic 
games, an Irish ballad concert and dancing. A pleasant time is a 
foregone conclusion. 

We are, it seems, to have the usual batch of spring weddings. That 
of Miss Amelita Ralston and Arthur Page, which takes place on the 
iHh of next month, will come Under that heading, I think. Later 
on there will be Miss Mattie Peters and Bob Woods'; Miss May V. 
Ives and Mr. Henry J. Crocker's, whose engagement is just announced 
and the wedding set, for April. Mrs. Pacheco and Miss Mabel are 
looked for here early in that month, and it is almost certain that Mr. 
Will Tevis and his pretty bride-elect will pair-off very soon after. 
These are but a few of many that are talked of, but the indications 
are that the marriage market will be very lively just before and after 
Lent this year. 

Mr. and' Mrs. W. B. Chapman are to be found at 1123 California 
street, and Mrs, Chapman has issued " at home "cards for Tuesday 
in January. Mrs. and Miss Miles will be at home on Wednesdays at 
Black Point. Mrs. Willie Howard, I hear, says that she has done 
her share of party-giving for the present, and intends spending some 
time with her husband's aunt, Mrs. Kedington, at Santa Barbara. 
If this be so. she will be a loss indeed, and greatly missed by her 
large circle of friends, for her entertainments have been numerous, 
handsome and always pleasant. Washington appears to be the 
Mecca of all our pilgrims at present. Senator Hearst has just de- 
parted thence; Mrs. Barreda and her daughters will probably be the 
next departures for the nation's capital. Mrs. M'Mullin and Miss 
Wallace have arrived there ere this, they intending to spend the 
Winter in the East, dividing their time between Washington and 
New York. Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Ladd, who left on Thursday, will 
similarly divide their time till after the inauguration, and in May ex- 
pect to sail for Europe, where an extensive tour is to be made. Harry 
Homans, whose death has just occurred in Paris, was well known 
in San Francisco twenty years ago, and he and his pretty wife, who 
died several years ago, are held in'warm remembrance by many an 
old-timer here. ' ' ■ Felix. 

Townsend, McGovern & Co. is the style of a new firm located at 
llfi Pine street, as the agents, so far as the Pacific Coast is concerned, 
of the firm of Delafield, Morgan, Kissei & Co., who will do a general 
shipping, commission and brokerage business in merchandise, insur- 
ance and freights, with a specialty of cannery supplies. The gentle- 
men composing the new firm are already well known in business cir- 
cles, and will "gpt there." 




W. B. CHAPMAN, 



123 California St., San Fra i>I*9©< 

SOLE AGENT FOR THE PACIFIC COA3 ■? 

For sale by all first-class Wine-Merchan^ 
and Grocers. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 19, 1889. 



SHALL OUR GIRLS LEARN TO COOK? 
OKE than once there have been attempts by private person 

to establish cooking-schoois in San Francisco. Under the 

auspices of the Young Women's Christian Association of 
_c)fej_ this city a cooking-school was carried on for some months, 

and then brought to an abrupt close, to be reopened not 
long since. A lady, formerly a resident of San Franciso, has just re- 
turned from the Bast as a graduate from the leading cooking-schools 
of Boston and New York, and she has opened a similar school on a 
small scale. Now, the question is, will these enterprises succeed— or, 
rather, do our girls care to cook? To consider this question in all 
its bearings would bring us at once face to face with the fact that San 
Francisco is fast becoming a city of boarding-houses, this resul t being 
reached through much trial and tribulation on the servant question. 
Time was when the " Heathen Chinee." with bis bland, child-like 
smite and his faint squeak of a voice, that continually said : " You 
teachee me, then I sabee," was regarded as a way out of the diffi- 
culty, but how fallacious this hope soon proved itself needs no 
demonstration. That every woman should know how to cook ad- 
mits of no argument. If. for no other reason than that without a 
fair practical understanding of the chemistry and the anatomy of 
cooking, a woman is at the mercy of every ignorant or dishonest 
servant, goes without saying. Nor is it necessary to dwell upon the 
mortification consequent upon having to confess: " I don't know 

There was once a lady in New York who, before her marriage, had 
never been inside of a kitchen. Her husband was a Boston man. 
and had frequently expressed a desire for some baked beans. Eager 
to gratify htm, the young wife held a consultation with thecook. who 
knew no more than she herself did how the New England delicacy 
should be prepared. A bright idea struck the girl. She had heard 
of bake-shops, where the baker, for a trifling sum, would set a pot of 
beans or a fowl in his great oven, and cook either to a turn. So mis- 
tress and maid, delighted at the easy solution of their difficulty, 
obtained a nice, new bean-pot. filled it with beans, and put a prime 
fat piece of salt pork upon the top. " There." said the young house- 
wife, surveying her work with satisfaction, " I'm sure they can't help 
be nice. Hurry to the baker with them, and ask him to have them 
done for to-night." In a remarkably short time the girl reappeared, 
breathless, in tears, and, what was more, in a rage. "Oh!" she 
gasped, " I never was so insulted in my life. He just looked at the 
pot, and shouted, ' Go home, you fool, and boil your beans !' " Now, 
that may be taken as a type of the ignorance of some housekeepers 
concerning the simplest culinary affairs. 

In the East, the importance of knowing how to properly prepare 
the moit nutritious food, at the least expense and with the smallest 
loss of its best qualities, is receiving constant attention. Besides the 
Boston Cooking-school and the New York School of Cooking, the 
latter taught by Miss Marie Parloa, there are cooking-schools estab- 
lished in connection with many asylums and institutions of learning. 
Even physicians and nurses are now required to take a course upon 
the p-oper foods for the sick, and as to how they should be prepared 
in an appetziing and nutritious manner. 

In conversation with Mrs. E. M. Hinckley, a graduate of the best 
schools in the East, I learned that the people of Boston took the 
greatest pride and interest in their cooking-schools. Many ladies 
and voung girls, who know nothing of the affairs of the kitchen, 
some of them at first not even recognizing the familiar frying 
pan, are regular attendants upon the school, and enter heartily 
into the spirit of the undertaking, becoming in a short time 
excellent cooks. Not a few of the more charitable ladies of 
Bostou maintain, at their own expense, cooking-schools in the 
poorer quarter of the city. Here worthy working girls, 
who otherwise would never have an opportunity to learn how 
to make their slender means go as far as possible towards build- 
ing up bone and sinew for their daily toil, are taught without charge 
in the evening, their teachers being the pupils in the normal class of 
the Boston Cooking School. That thisns indeed a charity may be un- 
derstood when it is known that the cost of the normal class course is 
one hundred dollars. In five of the public schools of that city cook- 
ing is taught once a week, the instructors also being the students in 
the normal class. The classes are limited to twenty at a time, and the 
work is entirely performed by the children, the teachers simply exer- 
cising a supervision. Some of the most satisfactory results obtained 
in this branch of education, at least so the teachers declare, are 
among the children, for they have no preconceived methods, no in- 
grained ideas to rise up and confront the teacher as she instructs 
them. How important it is to have a fresh clean sheet of paper upon 
which to transcribe ideas is thoroughly appreciated by every house- 
keeper who has ever tried " to get a girl to come into her way." 
There are not a few ladies who utterly refuse to consider the qualifi- 
cations of an old girl as a servant, simply saying, " No old women for 
me, they are too set in their ways." 

It is also customary in Boston for ladies who do not care to take 
the whole course to take special lessons upon some particular dish, 
the preparation of a soup or the manner of making some dainty des- 
sert. Many of them send their own cooks to take lessons in much 
the same way. It is one of the rules of all such institutions that the 
workers must wear a uniform. Indeed, in all Eastern institutions of 
learning, a uniform is becoming the proper thing, if for no other rea- 
son that it promotes esprit du corps. 



It certainly seems a very easy thing to become a good cook in these 
■days of cook-books. They are legion, and, as to price, they are not 
only given away, but are actually forced upon us by the butcher, the 
baker and the candlestick maker, that ubiquitous" trio who are sup- 
posed to represent all the tradespeople with whom a hapless house- 
keeper ever conies in contact. Even the almanac and the patent 
medicine man present their " little collection of carefully tested 
receipts." But still the most carefully compiled cook-book in the 
world is not without its own particular form of ambiguity. Its 
'" pinch " of this, or its " according to taste " of that, its " flour suf- 
ficient to roll," and its " water enough to make a stiff batter," have 
caused a tyro — failures and tears in about equal proportion. It 
"would be futile, at this late date and in the face of such a preponder- 
ance of testimony in their behalf, to speak against cooking-schools, 
even should one feel so inclined. But, after all, the greatest amount 
of experience is to be gained in one's own kitchen , with the door shut, 
the latter being an imperative condition, for milk sometimes will 
boil over on the stove, or one of the thousand and one calamities may 
happen which fill the soul of the young cook with woe and the house 
with a frightful odor. It takes a few practical experiments to con- 
vince a tyro that it is well to have a separate sauce-pan for different 
articles of food, and the best illustration to this effect is to eat mush 
■cooked in a sauce-pan which held the onions for dinner the day 
previous. 

Nearly all the cooking-schools start in with a preliminary lesson on 
how to build a fire. Simple as that may seem, it is of prime import- 
ance. The direful tale of disaster told in our childhood with the 
"refrain " and the fire won't burn "is only half of what fills the heart of 
a cook when the stove won't draw. To poke the fire from the top. to 
pile on more fuel when the fire is smouldering, to have the stove in a 
draught or to let the sun shine on a fire— what happens? Well, try 
it and see. There is nothing like practical illustration. Only re- 
member that flesh is an excellent conductor of heat, and that a hot 
cover-lifter is sure to make its mark. Di Vernon. 

Placer County. — The Placer county exhibit of citrus fruits in the 
Starr King building, at 123 fteary street, continues to attract many 
people, all of whom are enthusiastic in their admiration of the fruits, 
and the enterprise of those maintaining their exhibition. Oranges, 
apples, and indeed all fruits, are there in great variety and excellent 
quality, and grains and vegetables as well, showing that Placer 
county can well lay claim to being the garden of Nort hern C alifornia. 
Some of the boxes of prunes and raisins there shown are dimply 
marvelous, and how any one. after seeing these clean, healthy-look- 
ing fruits, can endure the sight, much less the taste, of the "mussed- 
over " foreign fruit that comes seemingly preserved in dirt, is past 
comprehension. California's fruit industry is destined to eclipse that 
>if her mining. 

— otj:r, — 

GREAT ANNUAL CLEARANCE SALE ! 



We begin the New Year with a Clearance Sale that eclipses all previous 
sales in the great variety and desirability of the goods displayed and the 
SWEEPING REDUCTIONS FROM REGULAR VALUES at which they are 
offered. This cut embraces EVERY ARTICLE IN OUR MAMMOTH 
STOCK, and no person should fail to visit our stores and examine the goods 
and prices during the sale. 

Extraordinary Reductions 



Ladies' Cloaks, Wraps and Jackets, Silks, Vel- 
vets, Black Dress Goods, Colored Dress 
G Mods, Laces, Ribbons, Gloves, Hosiery, 
Underwear, Gents' Furnishings, 
House Furnishings, etc. 




MARKET AND JONES STREETS, 

SAN FBANCISCO. [Jan. 5. 



■ - 



Jan. 19, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



6 



sparks. 

a HERE is to Institution In thu city that for pore nerve and 
ohaak keep* well abreast ol the tunes, though it lamentably 
falls below the standard pledged, and Is conducted with a 
_1„ bJa^i-handed disregard for the principles ol honesty and (air 
dealing. Ostensibly this Institution was projected for the 
ipUshment a! oharity In n noble and unostentatious way; its ob- 
feot, lupposedly, was to aid unfortunate gentlewomen whom the exi- 
gooeiMof fata had deprived ol nol only luxuries and comforts to 
which they had bean accustomed, but also of the very necessities of 
lift", and to assist thorn to earn, with as small an outlay as possible, 
and Lb the seclusion of their own homes, a little something to keep 
the wolf from the door. The sufferings Of this class of humanity, 

who. too proud to accept alms, bear with silent, proud fortitude the 
moat heart-rending privations, were too well known not to meet with 
ready sympathy. Clearly a charity that could assist these unfortu- 
nates was something to be encouraged. .So the just and unjust, saint 

and sinner, alike gave of their abundance; contributions were levied 
On all sides; bazaars and flower shows were liberally patronized, a 
restaurant was started, and when the organization made wide its bor- 
ders and enlarged its phy lactones and moved into commodious quar- 
ters on a fashionable street, the public naturally supposed it was 
self-supporting and a large-sized success. This it is not, and never 
will be as long as the persons in charge show an infantile lack of 
business ability, and, above all, manifest a lickspittle toadyism to a 
few rich subscribers. Charity— calm, just, beneficent— cannot walk 
band in hand with the cringing, crawling sycbophant who seeks self- 
atrgrandisenient first, last and always, and ruthlessly tramples under 
foot all the better instincts of humanity. 

» # » * * 

It is more than whispered, it is confidently asserted, that some of 
the grasping and greedy so-called ladies of tills city, who are anxious 
to turn a dishonest penny for their own private purse, boldly make 
use of the Exchange, and are permitted, by the carelessness or in- 
efficiency of those in charge, to carry away many a dollar that rightly 
belongs to the needy. They buy a membership ticket, presumably 
for some poor pensioner, and under its protection boldly send con- 
tributions of cake, preserves, pickles and jellies, that are sold as the 
result of the labor of poor women. Of course those dainties, made 
by high-priced cooks in well arranged kitchens, command a good 
price, and the money obtained from their sale is all clear profit for 
the rich woman, whose unsuspecting husband pays the grocery bills, 
and does not dream but that the itemized eggs, flour and sugar are 
consumed in his own family. The fancy work department is managed 
in the same loose way, and many a girl of well-to-do parents puts 
paintings and embroideries that have been done under the supervision 
of expensive teachers, cheek by joul with amateur efforts made in 
garrets and cellars. Naturally the latter suffer by comparison with 
the better workmanship and more elegant materials of the 
former; the purchaser seeing the two together unhesitatingly selects 
the better article, and some day the dusty and shop-worn little traps 
are dispatched to the maker with a polite note informing her that the 
enclosed work is unsalable. The restaurant is noted for its high 
prices and small quantities of food served. It would be charitable to 
presume that the ladies who preside overthis department are ignorant 
of the way it is run, but such is not the case; they are aware of it, 
groan under it, but continue to weakly submit to the tyranny of a 
very inefficient cook, who rules them all, from the President down, 
with a rod of iron, and by sheer force of will and character has made 
herself mistress of the situation and the establishment. Meanwhile 
the public, who can get the worth of their money in a dozen different 
places, stays away, though a little tact and taste displayed by those 
in charge would attract the careless crowd who would gladly patron- 
ize this institution if any pains were taken to supply people's wants. 
* * * * * * 

In connection with the demi-respectable dames who go to French 
restaurants in quest of wine and other diversions, there is wafted to 
my ears a little story that may be of interest to the lady's wide circle 
of acquaintances. Her antics are amusing enough to deserve more 
than a passing notice, and her scheme is certainly original, if not en- 
tirely successful. Her novel idea is to don the habiliments of woe, 
especially for the occasion, and thus protected to venture boldly into 
the lion's den, with the modest mien of a sixteen year old school girl. 
O , sancta semplicitus ! she evidently believes with the ostrich that if 
her head is hidden, her body is also concealed, so the heavy crepe 
veil envelops her in its voluminous folds, and she takes great credit 
to herself for the cleverness of her ruse. It is almost too bad to 
destroy this charming illusion, but the men about town have mostly 
caught on to the fair masquerader's scheme, and consider it one of 
the shows of the place to watch her exits and entrances from some 
coign of vantage. Her shamelessness in attempting to conceal an 
illicit love under the trappings of grief prove she is too care-hardened 
to dread the publication of her name; but again I hesitate to reveal 
it out of regard for her respectable connections; but let her and her 
kind beware how they try my patience too far, for my mission is to 
expose frauds, unearth sbaius, and protect society against these 
ravening wolves in sheep's clothing, who go about seeking whom they 
may devour. 

***** 

Several of us were sitting in the bar-room of a prominent hotel, and 
had given the order for that toothsome tipple known as a champagne 



cocktail. From my position l commanded a view of the bartender, 
and was idly watching his dexirmus moveiuenui when my attention 
became suddenly fixed and breathless at sight of adexteron 
which li«- managed with the skill of a veteran practiced in such del 
captions. He deftly uncorked a bottle of BarSSsthy'S champagne, 
emptied its content! into a bottle bearing a foreign label, placed it 
conspicuously in view and proceeded to mix the orders requiring this 
neverage. He used it in my tope, too, which I drank without com 
plaint, though 1 afterwards took him aside and remonstrated with 
him quietly, but firmly, on the error of his ways. I deplored b 
worthy deceit, assured him it was now quite good form to drink 
California wines in the East, ami insinuated that it woul-1 be B 
ful act on his part to give the devil his due in regard to the fruit of 
our vines. He of the diamonds and white-duck coat did not receive 
my well-meant remarks with the respect they were entitled to; he 
used some forcible language about fashion, remarked he knew his 
business pretty well, and wandered away muttering something about 
a prophet not having honor in his own country. Perhaps he was in 
the right, and probably Miss Kale Field was wise in her day and 
generation when she went East to preach her crusade for the wines 
of this Coast. " 'Tis true, 'tis pity, and pity 'tis, 'tis true " that there 
is hardly a man in the city, from the beardless boy who does not 
know the difference between claret and burgundy to the experienced 
i -in-nr. who does not blush with shame to be seen drinking the wine 
of California. Alack and alas! that we have no social leader here of 
the independence of that Hungarian Princess, who, by her clever- 
ness, patriotism and insistence, made the detestable wine of her 
country fashionable in half the capitals of Europe. 

* * « * * 

What a mutual admiration society the California colony, settled so 
cosily in New York, must be. In the eyes of each member the beauty 
and talents of the others assume majestic proportions. At last 
Utopia has been found, and the exiled 'Friscan is its prophet. 
***** 
We have been waiting patiently for the climax of the Sybil Sander- 
son-Massenet episode, and from the cabled " Paris Letter" it seems 
not so far off. A divorce is in the air. The Maestro's wife is jealous 
of the California songstress. Is this a form of advertisement? asks 
the unlearned reader. "Ah, no!" we reply. We know our Sybil." 
***** 
Upon one of our stateliest avenues, in one of our most luxurious 
abodes, dwells a lady upon whom Dame Fortune surely has showered 
her choicest gifts. But the canker of discontent eats out her heart al- 
ways on the rush for excitement. She has sacrificed in turn good name, 
position, husband and friends. I place them in this rotation, for 
thus they have departed one by one. Nothing seemed left her in the 
way of reckless living until she fitted up an opium den, and there in 
the top of her fine house is a regular " joint," where a few choice 
spirits are privileged to enter, and, with the lady who presides, enter 
into the fumes and delights ( !) of the vile narcotic. 

* * * * # 

" What a dreadfully immoral society you have here," is a remark 
often made by visiting strangers, and one is forced to reflect on the 
situation and ask oneself why is the assertion made and with what 
truth. The truth pur et simple lies in a nutshell. San Francisco 
society is in reality no worse than that of other large cities of wealth 
and culture, but— there's the rub— but they do not conceal their 
crookedness in this city of ours, as they do in the more polished 
centers of the world's surface. Sin flaunts decked in silk attire; vice 
flourishes in different forms, in the haunts of fashion as well as in the 
haunts of the degraded and lost. Social crimes are committed which 
if practiced in other places would result in ostracism, but here are 
not only tolerated but smiled upon. The advice given by Shakespeare, 
"Assume a virtue if you have it not," is apparently an unknown 
quality in our fashionable world. Lest this may be caviled at as 
untrue, suppose an illustration or two is offered in proof. 
***** 
Every one knows how tongues wagged when a friendship— purely 
platonic, of course— existed between a prominent merchant and a 
married lady. It was, indeed, a subject of laughter among their 
acquaintances; the heavy veil worn by the lady when the daily after- 
noon drive was taken in the open buggy, as though incognila was 
thus obtained. Yet who is bold enough to frown openly upon the 
pair now they are married, and society bestows its warmest smiles 
upon them"' No raking of past ashes here. 

* * * * * * * 

A prominent divine had a wife whose sympathetic touch had the 
power of soothing the excited nerves of a male friend (more platon- 
ics); and to such an extent would his paroxysms go, nothing would 
serve to quiet him but the actual presence of the lady. No nervous 
attacks occur now ; she is his wife — and society smiles. 



" What did the editor offer you for your poem?" "Two dollars." 
"That was an insult. What did you say to him?" "Nothing. I 
simply pocketed the insult." —Boston Gazelle. 



"How are yoo, Joe?" "No better." "No? What's the trouble?" 
" Bright's disease, I reckon," "Look at me! No Bright's Disease abnut 
me, is there? " "No, indeed. You're as fresh as a daisy." "Well, the 
doctors gave me no hope a year ago, when I went to drinking Bethesda 
Mineral water, and Now you see me." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 19, 1889. 



VANITIES. 

PLEATED vests of white Bengaline or faille Francaise are intro- 
duced into carriage cloaks of lady's cloth. One of the hand- 
somest cloaks shown this season is of golden-brown cloth, finely 
i embroidered in different shades of dall gold, opening over a 

vest of white Bengaline, and confined just below the waist by 
a broad sash of soft golden-brown silk. 

There is an attempt to revive the ancient fashion of flower-decked 
coiffures, and a New York belle recently appeared at Dehuouico's af- 
ter the opera with a wreath of lilies of the valley twisted in and out 
among the coils of her golden hair. 

Dainty little muffs of ostrich tips are made to be worn with the 
handsome boas of ostrich feathers. 

Night robes for winter wear are in soft flannel of the most delicate 
tints, made with Fedoras of white India silk and plissees of the silk or 
of deep lace about the throat and wrist. 

Jackets for young girls are made of handsome, smooth-finished 
cloth, such as Melton or patent beaver, with wide Empire vevers, edged 
with a broad band of undressed seakskio. 

White or tinted silk underwear is entirely passee. The importa- 
tions are in French nainsook or linen, and covered with a mass of 
hand embroidery and Valenciennes. 



New York modistes are using immensely wide sashes of black 
moire on cashmere house dresses in all the new reed green and 
empire green shades. The combination is dull, unlovely and in- 
artistic, but, it is claimed, will brin£- out blonde complexions in a daz- 
zling way, and it is called very " original." 

Copper shades are combined this season with deep blue in prefer- 
ence to black. A pretty costume of copper-colored cloth has a skirt 
of dark blue velvet, embroidered with a small cord into which are in- 
troduced some tinsel copper threads, a V of the velvet similarly 
corded shows at the throat above the folded vest of copper Bengaline, 
which is creased at the waist line under a belt of embroidered velvet. 



A new domino appeared at one of the opera balls in Paris this Win- 
ter. It was of black satin, with a hood to be drawn up over the head, 
and a beak projecting from the forehead, on either side of which was 
embroidered a brilliant green eye. The effet de perroquet was abso- 
lutely perfect. 



The Directoire canes and cane-handled umbrellas have found no 
favor among Americans. Only one or two have been seen on the 
streets of New York, and they were carried by ladies who do not set 
fashions in America, although, it is said, they do in Paris. Importers 
say they have hopes of disposing of their stock of these eccentricities 
in the Summer, when the " noisy " umbrella is considered good form 
or the seashore or for coaching. 

Black silk stockings are embroidered on the outside of the leg to 
simulate buttons and button-holes. 



Wide bracelets, of alligator skin, sealskin or Russian leather, hold 
tiny watches, and are worn outside the glove by ladies on a morn- 
ing shopping tour. 

The watch is no longer an article of jewelry, and is rapidly follow- 
ing into obscurity the long, showy chains which used to be indis- 
pensable to the time-piece. There are, of course, the tiny jeweled 
affairs, as elaborate and as expensive as it is possible to make them, 
hung on little chatelaines which have called for all the cut of de- 
signer and jeweler together, but the every day watch is set in a cor- 
ner of a card case, the clasp of a purse or in a leather case to append 
from the belt, considered as a purely useful, rather than an orna- 
mental adjunct of a lady's costume. 

Tiffany has made a card case for a wealthy New York woman, 
which is of delicate dove-gray undressed kid, fairly studded with 
diamonds set in silver. The stones are small, but very white and 
clear, and the case cost $750. 

Worth has been gradually lengthening the skirts of walking 
dresses, until now it is necessary to gather up the slight train of his 
cloth costumes on the street, but Redfern and other leading Ameri- 
can houses scorn the absurd innovation, or rather " retrogradation." 
Gotham girls are too devoted to trim, clean skirts when on the 
avenues and flying across Broadway, and it will be a long, hard fight 
to introduce even half-long gowns for street wear in New York. 

A pretty girl, at a recent fancy ball, appeared as " The Rose." She 
woreapliss<5eskirtof pale pink tulle, dotted irregularly with fine buds 
and leaves, a little shower of the dainty blossoms falling from a girdle 
of roses and leaves worn about the waist, with a dark green velvet 
bodice, edged with rose petals, and an immense single rose forming 
a cap perched on ber blonde head. She was pronounced to be the 
fairest " La France " that ever blossomed in the garden of girls. 



THE MYSTERY OF NATURE. 

The following poem by Theodore Tilton, which has never been 
published in any of his works, has just appeared in the Atlanta Con- 
stitution : 

The words of God are fair for naught 

Unless our eyes in seeing 
See hidden in the thing the thought 

What animates its being. 
The outward form is not the whole, 

But every part is molded 
To image forth an inward soul 

That dimly is unfolded. 
The dew falls nightly not alone 

Because the meadows need it, 
But on an errand of its own, 

To human souls that heed it. 
The stars are lighted in the skies, 

Not merely for the shining, 
But like the looks of loving eyes, 

Have meanings worth divining. 
The waves that mourn along the shore, 

The winds that sigh in blowing, 
Are sent to teach a mystic lore, 

Which men are wise in knowing. 
The clouds around the mountain peaks, 

The rivers in their winding, 
Have secrets, which to all we seek, 

Are secrets worth the finding. 
Thus nature dwells within our reach; 

And though we stand so near her, 
We still interpret half her speech, 

With ears too dull to hear her. 
Whoever yearns to see aright 

Because his heart is tender, 
Shall catch a glimpse of heavenly light 

In every earthly splendor. 
Whoever hears the coarsest sound — 

Still listens for the finest — 
Shall hear the noisy world go round 

To music the divinest. 
So, since the universe began. 

And till it shall be ended, 
The soul of nature and soul of man 

And soul of God are blended. 

IATTHIAS GEAY CO, 

206 Post Street, 

General Agents for the Celebrated 

STEINWAY & SONS' PIANOS ! 

(the best in the world). 
Ernest Gabler Pianos, 

Kranich & Bach Pianos, 
C. Roenisch Pianos, 
Dec. 15.] C. D. Pease & Co.'s Pianos. 

SCHEMMEL'S MUSIC HOUSE, 

72, 74, 76 and 78 East Santa Clara Street, San Jose, Cal. 
STEINWAY & SONS' and 

GEORGE STECK & CO.'S 
FIA3STOS. 

O. A. LUNT, 

TERPSIC H O RE A N ARTISTE, 

Academy, 1310 Polk, near Bush Street, San Francisco. 

Classes as Follows: 

Monday.. Berkeley and Sau Francisco I Thursday San Francisco 

Tuesday Alameda Fridav Oakland and San Francisco 

Weduesday San Francisco | Saturday Sau Francisco 



Charles R. Einselen. 



Louis J. Tschurr. 



8 to 14 O'Farrell Street, San Francisco. 

Balls, Parties, Weddings, etc., Furnished at the Shortest Notice. Private 
Apartments for Families and Banquets. 

Telephone 808. 
TSCHURR & EINSELEN, Proprietors. 

J. TOMKINSON'S LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 

Nos. 67, 59 and 61 Minna Street, 

BetFirst and Second, San Francisco, One Block Irom Palace Botel. 

SB* Carriages and Cabs at Pacific Club, No. 130 Post street; also North- 
east Cor. Montgomery and Bush. Carriages and Coupes Kepc at stable espe- 
cially for calling. Turnouts to rent by the month. Vehicles of every 
description at reduced rates. Telephone No. 153. 



Jan. 19, 188i>. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



FOUR NOVELTIES. 
The industrious reporters of the dtlllM -ay they vera never bo 
nnofa ;it a loaa to find "special features" »•• now. The Journalism 
t.f tola time ami plaoe deinanda " noveltlM/ 1 and it the news ol the 
day doea not supply them, ■ large amount o( Ingenuity must be ex- 
pended to ■■ tii>; them up." It i> no) our present purpose to cavil at 
tui- latest of new departures. We deeply sympathise with the class 
of writers required for this new work, who. it is said, are already at 
their wits' ends t<> Bud something new. We venture to offer them 
the suggestion that there arc not a few abuses In this young city of 
.Kir- about which it la possible i" " dig up " something both new and 
useful. As evidence of our kindly disposition towards them we now 
make them a contribution ol suggested subjects, about which ii is 
possible to say a great Meal that cannot fail to Interest their readers. 
Attention, then, may he very usefully Called to the ulmses of the 
present hire system Ol Obtaining many articles of household furni- 
ture, of private inquiry offices, ol money lenders and of commercial 
agencies. All four of these subjects involve eonsiderations of mo- 
ment to large classes oi readers. There is hardly an article of house- 
hold furniture that cannot now be "hired." The workings of the 
11 installment plan " are fruitful of episodes that could be " worked " 
tip into a series of most instructive articles. How the furniture man 
Cheats and is cheated are matters closely pertaining to the domestic 
economy of the period. Private detective offices are springing up 
all over the city, and invite customers to" inquire within about every- 
thing. " If a wife doubts that her husband remains down town to 
attend his club as often as he says he does, she causes a " private 
Inquiry " to be made, and finds out. The spy system has taken deep 
root in this city, and has wide ramifications, which it would be inter- 
esting to trace out and expose. If it is to become permanently 
established as a part and parcel of our social system, by all means 
let us comprehend its methods. Of money lenders, Asa Fiske is 
supposed to be the chief, as he certainly is the most notorious; but 
there are others even more deserving than he of public mention 
Their capacity to keep a borrower in debt is something wonderful. 
An interesting chapter might easily be written in elucidation of their 
ways. The so-called commercial agencies are, as a rule (to which 
there may be an exception), the most abominable parasites that ever 
fastened themselves upon a business community. They profess to 
supply their customers with statements from time to time of every 
business man's moral worth and finaucial standing. Their reports 
are frequently " influenced '' by considerations that render them 
utterly unreliable. It is easy to injure a business man's credit, and 
that fact is the basis upon which most of the commercial agencies 
conduct their operations and thrive. All too many of our tradesmen 
live in fear of rascally agencies, whose methods might well be venti- 
lated by a daily in search of "a feature." Here, then, are four 
novelties that a practical, work-a-day world would like to see taken 
in hand and written up for all they are worth. Which of our con- 
temporaries is equal to the task? 



SOMETHING NEW. 
California's exhibition on wheels, now traveling throughout the 
Eastern States, was supposed to be something new, and calculated 
to eclipse all previous methods of advertising a State's industries. 
It now turns out that the idea is neither as new nor as original as we 
had flattered ourselves it was. A bigger thing in the same line had 
previously been devised by the Export Society of Berlin. Five mill- 
ion marks have been raised to build the " Floating Exhibition Palace 
of Germany." The plan is to beard the foreign industrial lion in his 
den, so to speak, and to sail from port to port showing the superiority 
of German wares. " International exhibitions," says the prospectus 
" do not occur often enough, and must be supplemented in this way.' 
The vessel is to be called the Kaiser Wilheim, and is being built in 
German shipyards on a scale of magnificence to surpass anything 
afloat. According to plans, the ship will be 172 meters long, 20 wide, 
and 14 high. It will have four engines, propelling as many screws. 
The material will be principally German steel. The cost of a two- 
years' tour is estimated at 3,150,000 marks. The income from the 
rented space— 1,000 to 1,200 marks for each booth — and from sales, 
will be, it is thought, at least 7,20'0,800 marks, thus leaving a balance 
of over 4.000,000 marks profit on the two years' voyage. The figures 
certainly look well on paper. But whether a profit is made or not, 
it is certain that the advertisement will be a big thing. Emperor 
William is enthusiastically helping the project along. The ship, 
however, will not be ready to start before the spring of next year. 
Instead of the proposed representation of California's products in 
London and Paris, might it not be well to adopt the floating palace 
idea, and go forth to all the world and preach the doctrine of Cali- 
fornia's prosperity to all mankind? We should get a better adver- 
tisement for less money. Americans cannot afford to be outdone by 
the slow Germans in the matter of advertising. 

Congressman Springer's bill for the admission of the Territories 
to Statehood, which, with some modifications, is likely to become a 
law, suggests the names of Winona, Montezuma and of Tacoma, for 
South Dakota, New Mexico and Washington Territory respectively, 
while North Dakota will retain the name of Dakota, and Montana 
will be unchanged. All these suggested names are improvements, 
and may well be adopted. It now seems certain that all the Terri- 
tories seeking admission will have their way, except Utah. 



KID AND FABRIC GLOVES. 



SIX SPECIAL BARGAINS. 



From an unusually large and well appointed stock, we have s,ele< t, ,| ; , 
special oducemeuta a few lines, and marked them ut BQob£prloaB U ore 
prouoimced by our customers to be 

EXTRA GOOD VALUE. 

AT 26c, LADIES' 6 BUTTON LENGTH, JERSEY CASHMERE GLOVES 

AT 75c, LADIES' 4-BUTTON, SUEOE, EMBROIDERED BACKS. 

AT 55c, LADIES' 4-BUTTON FRENCH KID, EMBROIDERED BACKS. 



AT 85c, LADIES' 4-BUTTON "FRANCOZ" DOGSKIN, embroidered backs. 
ATJl.OOLADIEJ'6-BUrrON "FRANCOZ" DOOJKIN, embroidered backs 



AT {1.75, GENTS' 2-BUTTON "REYNIEY" KID GLOVES, embrotdere backs. 



Packages delivered, free, In Oakland Ale*aeda and Berkeley. 




111. Hi, 113, I 17, 119, 121 POST STREET. 

I0TICE TO SHIPPERS. 



Owing to notice received from lines in the Central 
Traffic Association (being lines between Chicago and St. 
Louis, on the west, and Pittsburg and Buffalo, on the 
east), by J. S. Leeds, Chairman of the Trans-Continental 
Association, that on and after January 21, 1889, said 
lines will require their full local rates on all business 
received from the Trans-Continental Association, notice 
is hereby given that the Southern- Pacific Company and 
its connections in the Trans-Continental Association will 
on the 24th of January, 1889, withdraw from the through 
rates eastbound from California published in Trans- 
Continental Association Tariff No. 19, effective January 
10, 1889, to Cincinnati, Detroit and common points, and 
Pittsburg, Buffalo and common points, by all routes, and 
to New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore and points 
common with each, by all routes except via New Orleans, 
and with the further exception that until further notice 
freight will continue to be contracted to points east of 
Chicago reached by the Erie Despatch. 

By order of J. S. Leeds, Chairman Trans-Continental 
Association. 

Approved : 

• Richard Gray, 

General Freight Agent. 
J. C. Stubbs, 

General Traffic Manager. 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 19, 1889. 



LETTER FROM VENICE. 

Venice, December 20, 1888. 
EAR KATE: " I stood in Venice, on the bridge of sighs." 
\J \ Yes, I did, and I am still under the spell Venice casts over 
j^l every one that first beholds her world of marble palaces, her 
forests of graceful columns, and her labyrinth of liquid streets, 
where the foot seeks in vain for terra firma, and the eye 
looks with vague apprehension upon the dark, coffin-like gondolas 
that float like phantoms over the green waters of the canals; the 
gondoliers, like Charon, standing at one end plying his oar, and in 
mute appeal holding out his hand for the coin, his pay after taking 
you across the river Styx, to that melancholy spectre city on the La- 
gunes. 

Really, Venice is not like a live city ; it is a stone poem with its St. 
Mark's church, its ancient Doge's Palace and its wonderful monu- 
ments. The very approach is different trom any other large town, 
where business stretches its branches out to the suburbs; here, on 
thecontrary, as you near the city, all noise is hushed, the land seems 
to recede, the train to navigate through the Lagunes. The only signs 
of life, as far as the eye reaches, are black barges, laden with wood, 
vegetables or fruit, wending their way silently toward the city. Af- 
ter passing over the stone pier that stretches more than a mile into 
the open sea, the train finally halts at the station, where in vain you 
look for coach or carriage, but, instead, are shown to the inevitable 
gondola. With much foreboding we confided our luggage and per- 
sons to the strange conveyance, dropped the obligatory copper into 
the hands of the lazzarone, who steadied the frail bark while we en- 
tered it, and seems to be omnipresent wherever you go, whether you 
want him or not, and off we went through the Grand Canal, into lit- 
tle side streets, silent as a grave yard excepc for the splashing 
of the water as the oars strike it, or the warning cries of the gondo- 
liers: "Boat ahead! To the right! To the left!" During the most 
brilliant era of the Venetian Republic, these gondolas that to-day 
wear the black uniform used to be very luxurious institutions, cov- 
ered with velvets and stuffs of dazzling hue; and the blonde patrician 
women vied with each other in the elegance of their turnout, but they 
carried extravagance to such an extent that the law, to limit their 
wasteful opulence, decreed that all boats should be covered with som- 
bre black. The only exceptions are funeral gondolas, which carry 
bright red when conveying the dead to their last resting place on 
Cemetery Island, for ground in Venice is too precious to the living 
to cede one foot of it to the dead. The streets are narrow, adapted 
to the need of pedestrians only; there are no vehicles whatever, not 
even a wheelbarrow ; no horses, in fact very few quadrupeds of any 
kiud. During our stay I saw but two, a dog and a cat, and they were 
looked at as curios. All traffic is done by boat. Private conveyances 
are recognized by liveried gondolieros. The silence in the streets, to 
one accustomed to, and fond of, large cities soon becomes oppressive. 

Our first walk took us to St. Mark's Place, the largest square in town, 
bounded by St. Mark's church, the Doges' palace, the Royal Palace and 
the Procuratie, handsome, palatial buildings that the procurators, 
the highest officials of the Republic, used to inhabit. A pretty at- 
traction of this square is the pigeons that flock around you by the 
hundreds if you throw them a few grains of corn; they are held in 
honor by all citizens, and consequently have become so tame that 
they alight on your head, shoulders and arms, eat out of your hands 
and pick the grains from your lips without the least fear, enjoying 
the freedom of the city, as granted to theirancestors, in gratitude for 
carrying to Venice the news of the conquest of Candia in the thir- 
teenth century. 

After having spent a half hour with these pretty birds, we entered 
St. Mark's, that Christian church which in its Oriental splendor much 
more resembles a Turkish mosque, with its Moorish ornamentations, 
its beautiful mosaics, its golden wealth and mystic symbols. 

But Venice is like a casket, full of rarest jewels. Hardly have you 
looked at one when the next claims your attention, and the next here 
is the Doge's Palace, which, though parts of it were at different times 
destroyed by fire, like Phoenix always rose from the ashes; only the 
loss of valuable paintings, burned in 1577, remains irreparable. The 
golden stairs, so-called because they were once used only by the no- 
ble patricians whose names graced the pages of the Golden Book, 
lead to the large square entrance hall, and from here, through the 
whole line of grand apartments, our visit was one continuous feast 
of form and color, which changed character only when we reached 
the library, famous for its treasures of books, autographs, docu- 
ments. If you ask for it, the librarian will show you the gem of all, 
locked in a glass case to protect it from profane hands—the Grimani 
Breviary, an ancient prayer book, charmingly illustrated with Mem- 
ling's miniatures. 

From here we went by gondola to the Academy of Fine Arts, to 
gaze on Titian's great masterpiece: " The Assumption of the Madon- 
na," of the exquisite coloring of which no photograph can give you 
the faintest idea. We spent a long time in contemplating it; still, 
one should really see it again and again to appreciate its marvelous 
beauty, but we had to throw a glance at least at the other twenty- 
three salons, and our time was limited. The last room we visited 
contains pencil and crayon sketches, attributed to the old masters, 
and a simple, dark marble urn, which encloses Canova's right hand, 
the hand that has called so many glorious forms from cold marble. 
His heart is at the Frari Church, where next we went, to see the 
Mausoleum that the great man himself designed for Titian, but 



which was finally erected by contribution from all Europe and Ameri- 
ca, in grateful appreciation of Canova. The whole thing is exquisite- 
ly beautiful. At the half open door of the tomb stands Sculpture, a 
graceful female figure in sweeping draperies, her head bowed in grief, 
her hand holding the marble urn containing the great artist's heart, 
(his body is buried at his native place) and though Ruskin in his 
' Stones of Venice" finds fault with this monument on account 
of its pyramidal form, he declares it unsuitable for a Christian 
church, that does not alter the undeniable fact of its great beauty; 
and then, somehow, I cannot look upon Italian churches simply as 
such: they are in truth temples of art, so full of adorable marbles 
and paintings that one thinks of the divinity only as the inspiration 
that quickened into life these artistic conceptions. The churches are 
not awe inspiring like the Gothic cathedrals of Germany, but rather 
theatrical with their red and gold decorations, their madonnas, daz- 
zlingly brilliant with precious stones and metals, offerings of such fer- 
vent Catholics, as, for instance, Empress Eugenie of France, whose 
valuable gift of a diamond necklace glitters on the throat of the black 
madonna (painted by St. Luke, tradition says) at St. Mark's. 

What a city of memories this is; from the dim past up to yes- 
terday, they rise before you. Here, next to the Grand Hotel, a mod- 
ern caravansery in an old palace, stands a narrow house, built in the 
Romanesque-Gothic style, where gentle Desdemona lived before the 
Moor won her heart. Yonder rises the Rialto, where Shylock drove 
his cruel bargain, and still beyond lies the old Ghetto, where lived 
Jessica, the Jew's fair daughter. We pass the palace Moncenigo, 
wherein 1818 Lord Byron lived and wrote; not far from this the 
house of the famous ballerina, Taglioni. Here, only lately. Wagner 
composed his last strains before his soul joined the music of eternity. 
There are the very marble steps from which Lucretia Borgia stepped 
nto her gondola to mix with the gay revelers of the carnival, and 
yonder, Torgnato Tasso sang his exquite stanzas. Ah, me! Onecould 
dream forever under the deep blue sky of Venice. Hirondelle. 



Jack Potts— In Siam, they say, husbands put up their wives and 
gamble for them. Here we only put up our antes. Billy Bluff— Yes, 
and when we get broke we work our uncles. — Town Topics. 

A Tale Of 213. 
Two fair young ladies who went to Swains 

Original Bakery, Sutter street, 
To escape from provoking winter rains, 

And eat some cakes and ice creams sweet, 
Discovered that they could keep house with ease 

If from this house they could furnish their teas. 

ZBAZETIECS. 

THE GERMAN SAVIN6S AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California Street, San Francisco. 
CAPITAL $800,000. 

Officers— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President, FRED. EOEDING: Cash- 
ier, A. H. R. SCHMIIU'; Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN. Board of 
Directors— L. Gottig, Fred. Roediug, Chas. Meinecke, Edw. Kruse, George H. 
Eggers, N. Van Bergen, lgu. Steinhart, 0. Schoemann. Secretary, Geo. 
'f ournv. Attorneys, Jabboe, Habbison and Goodfellow. [Dec. 1. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL RANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

822 PINE STREET. 
PAID-UP CAPITAL J1.000.000. 

DIRECTORS : 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, | E. H. MILLER, Ja. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH Pbesident. 

W. E. BROWN Vice-Pbesident. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashibb. 

[Oct. 23.] 

SECURITY SAVIN6S BANK. 

Guarantee Capital $330,000 

OFFICERS: 

President JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary S. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-President W. S. JONES | Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. Aug. 22. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Sansome and Pine Streets. 

LONDON OFFICE— 3 Angel Court. 
NEW YORK CORRESPONDENT— J. W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL STOCK, $6,000,000. 
Will receive deposits, open accounts, make collections, buy and sell 
exchange and bullion, loan money and issue letters of credit available 
throughout the world. FRED. F. LOW, | M _ n „„- 

IGN. STEINHART,! Mana S ers - 
P. N. LirJENTHAL, Cashier. [March 26. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 18 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated November 24, 186 ». 

ADOLPH C. WEBER. ...Pbesident. | ERNST BRAND Secretary. 

LOANS AT LOW RA TES, [Dec. 29. 



Jan. 19, ' 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTER. 



POT POURRI. 



"A FRIEND. LADS, A FRIEND." 

Of nil the k»hm! gifts that in royalest measure 

Drop down t<> the earth from the beautiful skies, 

a friend, ladi, a friend la tin- Attnl to treasure — 
A friend with a soul in bis BtralghMook.ng ©yea I 

A near one, a dear out 1 , a Sterling ami soun-1 imr. 

Boarot twtCfl i* he {■mini in our life's working day; 
Thank God with rejoicing if only you've found one, 

And love him and keep him forever and aye. 

Ah. coinrade> *'iio\v (be it said with decorum). 

You'll gel for the asking in hamlets and towns, 
Who gaily will empty the glasses you pour 'em, 

And laugh at your Bailies and borrow your crowns, 
Bat those jolly birds are of volatile feather; 

They lly with the autumn and come with the spring; 
If clouds are presaging a change in the weather, 

They'll bid you good-bye with a Hick of the wing. 

A friend, lads. God bless him' warm-bearted, stout-handed 

He's loving and loyal and always the same; 
But still, to your follies he's open and candid — 

You prize his approval, you shrink from his blame. 
He'll laugh at your side when the Maytime is shining, 

But closer he'll draw on the storm-beaten way; 
Be 'a like the old coat with the honest warm lining — 

You rind out his worth in the winterly day. 

— Frederick Langbrklge. 

WEDDED. 

Some quick and bitter words we said, 

And then we parted. How the sun 
Swam through the sullen mist of gray 1 
A chill fell on the Summer day. 
Life's best and happiest, hours were done; 

Friendship was dead. 
How proud we went our separate ways, 

And spake no word and made no moan! 
She braided up her (lowing hair, 
That I had always called so fair, 
Although she scorned my loving tone, 

My word of praise. 
And I ! I matched ber scorn with scorn. 

1 hated her with all my heart, 
Until — we chanced to meet one day; 
She turned her pretty head away; 
I saw two pretty teardrops start, 

Lo! love was born. 
Some fond, repenting word I said, 

She answered only with a sigh; 
But when I took her hand in mine 
A radiant glory, half divine. 
Flooded the earth and rilled the sky — 

Now we are wed. — Chambers 1 Journal. 



AFTER DEATH. 

1 would not have thee warm when 1 am cold; 

But both together— 'neath some sylvan mound, 

Amid the pleasant secrets under ground, 
Where green things flourish in the embracing mould, 
And jealous seeds the souls of blossoms hold — 

In some sweet fellowship of silence bound. 

Deeper than life, more exquisite than sound, 
Rest tranquilly while Love's new tales are told. 

We will not grudge the waking world its bliss — 
Its joy of speech, its gladness of surprise, 

When lovers clasp each other's hands and kiss, 
And earth puts on new glory to their eyes: 
We lying there, with Death's deep knowledge wise, 

Will know that we have found Life's best in this. 

—Louise Chandler Moulton. 

IN BOHEMIA. 

I came between the glad green hills, 
Whereon the Summer sunshine lay, 
And all the world was young that day, 

As when the Spring's soft laughter thrills 
The pulses of the waking May: 

You were alive; yet scarce I knew 

The world was glad, because of you. 

I came between the sad green hills, 
Whereon the Summer twilight lay, 
And all the world was old that day, 

And hoary age forgets the thrills 

That woke the pulses of the May: 

And you were dead— how well I knew 

The world was sad, because of you. 

— Louise Chandler Mo-utton. 



B-A-ISTICS. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $2,500,000 

RESERVE FUND 600,000 

Southeast corner California and Sansoms Streets. 

Head Office— 28 CORNHILL, London. 

Branches— Portland. 0.: Victoria, British Columbia. 

Sub-Branches— New Westminster. Vancouver. Nanaimo and Kamloops. British 
Columbia. 

This Bauk transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts om-nod m>i>- 
Ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills dlsoouiited and ad- 
vances made ou good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Mend Ollk'e and Brauches. and upon its Agents, as follows- 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bauk of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bank: SCOTLAND— Britii-h Linen Company IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— Loudon Bank 
of Mexico and South America; CHINA aud JAPAN— Chartered Bauk of 
Iudia, Australia aud China; AUSTRALIA aud NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Baukiug Company of Sydney, English, Scottish and 
Australian Chartered Bauk aud National Bauk of Australasia; DEMERARA 
aud TRINIDAD (West IndiesJ-Coloulal Bauk. fMarch 24. 

BANK OF CAUFORNIA^lAN FRANCISCoT 

Capital $3,000,000 

WM. ALVORD, President. 
Thomas Bbown. Cashier | B. Murray, Jr .. .Assistant i:ashlei 

AGENTS: 

NEW YORK— Ageucy of the Bauk of California; BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bauk; CHICAGO— Union National Bauk; ST. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Saving Bank; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealaud. Correspondent 
In Loudon— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sous. Correspondents in India, 
China, Japan aud Australia. 

The Bauk has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the 
principal Mining Districts aud Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Deuver. Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland, O., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Frankiort-ou-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Syduey, Auckland, Hongkong, 
Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy and Switzerland. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 

1 ESTABLISHED IN 1870.J 
UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY. 

CAPITAL STOCK PAID UP .$1,500,000 

SURPLUS $300,000 

UNDIVIDED PROFITS 1 52,974— 452,974 

DIRECTORS: 

8. G. Murphy, James Moffitt, D. Callaghan, Geo. A. Low, James M. Donahue, 

James D. Phelau, N. Vau Bergeu, Jas. H. Jennings, J. A. Hooper. 

President. S. G. MURPHY I Cashier E.D.MORGAN 

Vice-President .JAMES MOFFITT | Ass"t Cashier .. . GEO. W. KLINE 
Trausacts ageneral banking business. Issues Commercial aud Travelers' 
Credits. Buys aud Sells Exchauge ou Loudon, Dublin, Paris, the pnuuipal 
cities of Germany aud the United States. Collections made aua prompt 
returns rendered at market rates of exchange. I Sept. 8. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 | Paid Up Capital $2,000, 000 

Reserve Fund, $250,000. 

Head Office 9 and 10, Tokenhouse Yard, Lothbury, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd. ), 46 Exchange Place. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 Boulevard 
Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Commercial 
and Travelers' Credits issued. DAVID CAHN, j M . n ... r . 

EUGENE MEYER,} Maaa e ers - 
C. Altschtjl, Cashier. [March 26. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

Agency atNbw York 62 Wall Street 

Agency at Virginia, Nevada. 

London Bankers Union Bank of London (Limited i 

DIRECTORS: 

JAMES G. FAIR,. JAS. L. FLOOD, JNO. W. MACK A V 

A. E. DAVIS. JOHN F. BIGELOW. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 

Capital and Reserve, $2,375,000. 

San Francisco Office. 424 California St. I London Office 22 Old Broad St. 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, William Steel. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. Juno 9- 

WELLS, FAR60 & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $4,694.8Cb.04 

DIRECTORS: 
Lloyd Tevis, President: Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Chas. F. Crocker. J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris, Geo. E. Gray 
aud W. F. Goad. H. Wadsworth, Cashier. 

Receive Deposits, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Banking 
Business. [Aug. 6. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 19, 1889. 



KHE third week of the Carleton Opera Company was inaugu- 
rated with a fine presentation of the opera of Dorothy, the 
music of which is by Alfred Cellier, who was first introduced 
to American audiences by The Specter Knight, a charming 
operetta, yet one which made no money for anyone during 
its somewhat desultory career. Mr. Cellier is said also to have or- 
chestrated Pinafore, and worked, more or less, with Arthur Sullivan 
in times past. Dorothy is having a great run in London, and deserves 
its success, for it is bright musically and clever in dialogue, though 
tlie librettist's name is not given, possibly because in idea it is such a 
bald case of " Boucicaulting " from Martha and She Stoops to Conquer. 
Clara Lane made a most exquisite Dorothy Bantam, alias Martha, 
alias Miss Hardcastle. She is just petite enough, just piquant enough, 
just bewitching enough. Her eyes area compound of the delights of 
Heaven and the allurements of Hades, and are simply irresistible, 
especially when her voice is so charming, her notes so bird like, her 
carriage so thoroughly natural and her acting exhilarating. Only 
once did she fail to do herself exact justice on Monday evening, and 
that was in singing the hunter's song, which lacked a little in the 
female aggressiveness which is requisite, but which we can well spare 
in view of the more womanly charms displayed. Mr. Carleton was 
in excellent voice, and distinguished himself in "My Head I Bow, 
and My Back I Bend," and in the midnight serenade at his sweet- 
heart's door. J. K. Murray did his best work of the season in " "Wel- 
come to Chanticleer Hall," wherein his strong voice was heard to 
excellent advantage. Alice Vincent's Lydia was also capitally done, 
as well as Jay C. Taylor's Harry Sherwood. The fun of the opera is 
of the broadest kind, and found excellent interpreters in Charles H. 
Drew and Clara Wisdom, the former a bailiff and the latter a house- 
keeper. The Mikado was given Thursday night and Nanon last night, 
too late for particular reference. They will be repeated at the per- 
formances this afternoon and evening. It is quite safe to pronounce 
Miss Lane's Yum-Yum as the best ever seen and heard here, and 
Mr. Drew's Koko is acknowledged to be the best. Erminie will be 
given next week. 

****** 

The Black Crook gets sheared of its original " glories" more and 
more at each presentation. Originally a melodrama of the rankest 
kind, what is it now? It is about a quarter of a century since 
Charles M. Barrass was haunting the theatrical managers of New 
York to induce them to produce a new melodrama. No one would 
touch it. Finally one of them, who had a ballet troupe on his hands, 
and did not know what to do with them, took the melodrama, cut it 
liberally, introduced his ballet, tacked on a transformation scene as 
a peroration, and made a sensation and a success. Barrass made a 
fortune out of it, but died broken-kearted because his "beautiful 
play" had been spoiled by the ballet, whereas, if played as originally 
written, it probably would have met the fate of Count Johanne's. 
Probably not one twentieth of the original play is given this week at 
the Grand Opera House. The rest is ballet. We could even dis- 
pense with theone-twentieth.it is so insufferably stupid. But the 
ballet is brilliant, the dancing spirited and artistic, the variety funny, 
and the Ongar sisters' part thrilliug in the extreme. The operetta 
ballet, introducing dances to music and with costumes from The, 
Mikado, Patience, The Little Tycoon and other operas, is original and 
taking. The Black Crook will be continued another week. 

* * * * * * 

The Golden Giant is on at the Alcazar. It is one of the best of the 
melodramas, and is played in a capital way, George Osbourne, as 
Jack Mason, interpreting the character to the life, while Ethel Bran- 
don has one of her most feeling roles in Ethel Wayne. Hattie 
Moore, as Bessie Fairfax, is sufficiently grotesque in her idea of hu- 
mor, and James Garden gives one of his very best characterizations 
in Alexander Fairfax. The other characters are well taken. Fanchon, 
tlie Cricket, with Kate Mayhew in the title role and L. R. Stockwell 
and Ethel Brandon in the cast, will be given next week. 

* * » * * 

Martha is being given creditably, all things considered, at the Tivo- 
li, with Louise Leighton and Louise Manfred alternating as Martha, 
Frank Valerga and Henri Laurent alternating as Lionel, Campobeilo 
as. Plunket, Adeline Brandon as Nancy, and Henry Norman as Lord 
Tristan. Miss Manfred appeared on Tuesday evening and sang 
spiritedly, with a make-up and manner slightly like Patti. Her 
voice is clear and strong, though it lacks at times a desirable shading 
of delicacy. Campobello's voice always stands him in good stead, 
and this evening found bim in good vocal form. But he should re- 
member that Plunket is "a wealthy young farmer,'' not a San Fran- 
cisco hoodlum. His John L. Sullivan sparing off at Lord Tristan, 
when they meet in the wood scene, is in exceedingly bad taste. Mr, 



Laurent sings better than he has for a Jong time, and acts intelligent- 
ly. Mr. Norman's characterization is remarkable in being original. 
Lord Tristan is invariably made rather dudish, effeminate and some- 
what negative. Mr. Norman makes him sturdy, aggressive and com- 
manding. We shall be pardoned if we go out and catch a breath of 
fresh air before venturing to express an opinion on this assumption. 
Nest week La Traviata will be given to close the grand opera season. 
***** 
The following programme was rendered at the sixth and last 
orchestral matinee of the first series at Irving Hall, on Friday after- 
noon, January 11th, which was local composers' day : 1. Concert 
Overture, Fred. Zech, Jr.; 2. Adagio (Suite, E minor), John Parrott; 
3. Fantasie for violincello, Servais, Mr. Louis Heine; 4. Barcarolle 
(Santa Barbara). J. D. Redding; 5. Introduction (Le Pompadour), 
R. Lucchesi; (J. Gavotte (Sweet Marguerite), J. C. Sorg: 7. Dance of 
the Elves, Romandy; 8. Marche d'Eglise, J. H. Rosewald. The fir?t 
number was rather impressive, though inclined to be stilted and 
noisy in some of its phases, while the second was more pleasing, with 
some fine work in melody expressed. The third was interesting, and 
was played superbly, though on an instrument whose woodeny 
qualities robbed the work of much beauty that it would otherwise 
have expressed. There was nothing particularly noticeable about the 
other works, if we may except the seventh and eighth. Mr. Roman- 
dy's seemed full of good ideas in the start, and failures at the finish— 
at least, to be just, in being rather fussy in preparation, with nothing 
to show for it. The elves want more dance and less preparation, to 
put it in a homely way. Mr. Rosewald's work was rather impressive, 
and was rendered with more precision than any other number. Despite 
the fact that nothing great was offered, the afternoon was interesting, 
and we hope to see our local composers encouraged to make further 
offerings. 

***** 

The Boston Quintette Club appeared at Metropolitan Hall on Tues- 
day evening, and again (presumably) last night. The members of 
the quintette seem to be entirely en rapport one with the other, and 
play in the most perfect unison and harmony. Their personnel is 
distinctive ; all are young men with marked facial peculiarities. One 
of the violinists bears a striking resemblance to the pictures of the 
composer Mendelssohn— a fact of which be is probably aware and 
higntens as much as possible. The youthful flute-player wears a 
curl — in fact, a ringlet — over his forehead, which swings to and fro, 
when he makes his profound obeisance, in a very funny way. He, 
the leader and the Mendelssohn fac-simile are Germans, the 'celloist 
is a Hebrew, and the fifth member is the only one who has American 
features. The programme was well arranged, several of the numbers 
being entirely new to San Francisco ears. The melodious and fa- 
miliar " Traumerei " of Shumann's was given so exquisitely as 
to call forth at its close a prolonged " Ah!" of enjoyment, followed 
by enthusiastic applause. 

***** 

The concerted numbers were thoroughly enjoyable and excellently 
rendered. Mr. Hentschel, the flute soloist, bandies his instrument 
with feeling and delicacy ; his tone is sweet and clear, though some- 
times marred by a slight vibration. Mr. Rhodes, the leader of the 
Club, is a remarkably brilliantand finished performer. His "Souvenir 
D'Haydn" drew an encore, to which he responded with a selection, 
which displayed his skillful bowing and fine execution, but contained 
not one bar of melody. Mr. Blumenberg's 'cello solo was very fine; 
he is evidently a master of that instrument. Miss Carpenter, the 
prima donna, is a lady of fine presence and pleasing manners: but 
her voice was very disappointing. It is thin in the upper register, 
exceedingly unmusical, and has little expression. The " Quintette " 
would be sufficiently attractive without her assistance. By the way, 
is it a Boston " fad " or a quintette "affectation ;" each man wears a 
bright red silk handkerchief tucked in his vest. Possibly they think 
that thus they may attract the attention of the" rowdy West "of San 
Francisco, as the Mexican bull-fighter catches the eye of his animal. 

Cut bonof 

* *. * * * * 

A complimentary benefit has been tendered to Dan McCullough 
Treasurer, by Messrs. Al. Hayman and Wra. T. Carleton, to take 
place at the Baldwin Theatre on Sunday, January 27th. The Bald- 
win on this occasion will not be large enough to hold the throng of 
friends of the popular young Treasurer. So, take the advice of one 
who knows, and get your tickets early. The programme will be a 
fine one. 

***** 

With two such Claras as Clara Lane and Clara Wisdom, the Carle- 
ton Opera Company ought to be able to de-clara dividend at the close 
of the season. 

****** 

A second series of Mr. Rosewald's delightful orchestral matinees is 
announced to begin on Friday, January 25th, and to take place every 
alternate Friday thereafter. At the first matinee the orchestra will 
be assisted by Miss Cecelia Adler, the well-known soprano. 

******* 

The Louise Pyk concerts have been definitely fixed for the even- 
ings of the 8th and 19th of February. 

Blindness prevented by consulting Muller, the oldest reliable Optician 
in all eye difficulties. 13d Montgomery street, near Bush. 



Jan. ID, 1&9. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 




T r~7 H K forthcoming alectforj of officers In the California Athletic 
L. _J Club is likely to mark a critical period in the history of the 

organization. The reputation which the president and 
1 directors have made as promoters of clean, honest boxing 

contests is known throughout America. Not a breath of 
su-tpirion has ever yet attached to any contest held either in the 
Blab's gymnasium or elsewhere under its direction. The value of 
having such a name at their control is appreciated by the gambling 
element, which, led by a well-known local gambler, is laying its plans 
to capture the organisation. At the next election it is reported that 
two tickets will be in the tield, one backed by the honest members of 
the club, and the other backed by those who would have the gam- 
blers run things to suit themselves. The nominating committee 
VOuld i\o well to bear this in mind, and present such a ticket that the 
dishonest minority can present no reasonable excuse for kicking and 
getting up an opposition ticket. The gentlemen who are at the head 
of affairs, as well as rank and file of the members, may as well under- 
stand, first as last, that the very existence of the club depends on its 
maintaining an utnsmirched reputation. There is nothing on earth 
to keep the members together but the interest which attaches to its 
boxing contests, and once let the public question the character of 
these exhibitions and the club will be virtually a thing of the past. 
The gamblers have not perfected their plans so far that a little in- 
genious action will not disarrange them, and the time has come when 
the houest element must summarily squelch those who would turn 
the gymnasium into a den of thieves and fight-fixers. 

****** 

Some sly work has been going on at the Olympic Club rooms 
this week in the way of preparing a surprise party for Kitchen of the 
Acme Club, who all but knocked out Gaston Ashe not long ago. J. 
J. Corbett, the Olympic boxing instructor, had a heavy-weight 
named Hogan in hand, who undertook to best Kitchen. As the 
tournament started last night, the outcome of all the schemes that 
were laid cannot be told, as the contests came too late for an extended 
notice. The winners of the prizes may be assured of one thing how- 
ever, and that is that their victories will not settle once for all the 
amateur champion's feather class. The reason is that the Olympic 
Club Directors adopted an arbitrary classification of weights of their 
own instead of taking the usual ones. They divided the contestants 
into four classes — feather-weights, under llfi pounds; light-weights, 
Hf) to 135 pounds; middle-weights, 135 to 158 pounds, and heavy- 
weights, 15S pounds and over. There was no sense in this classifica- 
tion, and the Directors by adopting it barred ont many men who 
would otherwise have entered. The five classes should all have been 
represented ; the bantam-weights being under 116 pounds, the feather- 
weights from 110 to 120 pounds, the light-weights from 120 to 140 
pounds, the middle-weights from 140 to 158 pounds, and the heavy- 
weights all over 158 pounds. 

The Olympic Club has at last adopted the plans and estimates for 
their new gymnasium on Post street, and all that remains to be done 
is to gather in the money and get to work. We have several times 
given a description of the clubhouse and gymnasium, which, when 
completed, will be the finest of its kind in America. It is needless 
at this time to repeat the details. The lot has been cleared for build- 
ing, and everything is in readiness for active operations. It is meet, 
at this time, that a word or two of caution be said to some half-dozen 
or dozen kickers who have fought the project through thick and thin. 
They have, during the past six months, aired their grievance often 
and thoroughly, in season and out. Their protests and their objec- 
tions have not been heeded, and the club is committed to the most 
important step in its history. Now is the time when perfect harmony 
must prevail, or the club will be stranded. To these perennial kick- 
ers we would say that while the directors and the building committee 
may not be as wise or as energetic as they might be, now is the time 
for all objectors to hold their peace. We have more confidence in 
the business sagacity and tact of William Greer Harrison than we 
have in all the others who have anything to do directly with award- 
ing or superintending the contract. We believe that Mr. Harrison 
will be able to lead the club safely through this movement, and again 
we would urge upon all the necessity for united action. It will not 
do, six months hence, for the malcontents to get the ear of the 
Examiner and pour out their imagined woes. 

# * * * # 

During the next month it will not be an uncommon sight out in 
Golden Gate Park and at Central Park to see the six days go-as-you- 
please men training for the great contest which is to begin February 
21st. Already three pedestrians, well known here by name, are in 
the city, and will soon begin training. The men are Robert Vint, who 
has repeatedly covered more than 550 miles, Thomas Howarth and 
E. C. Moore, who has covered 554 miles in the allotted 144 hours. Vint 
is by all means the best man of the two, and he has the best record, 
he having once trotted 57854 miles. That was in 1881, however, and 
he is confident that he can cover considerably over 600 miles now that 



he is older and is m an invigorating atmosphere, ah three men be- 
lieve that Littlewood'n record <>i 828 miles will be beaten, and Prank 
Hal), the manager, will not be surprised il 650 miles or even Tun m 
made by the winner. The men will atari February 21st, and the 
tedium of their tramp will be relieved by sprint, races on the matu 
floor of the Pavilion. 

* * * * » 

We reiterate what we said last week with regard to the proposed 
boxing contests between Jackson and Cardiff or Kill en. Jaefcsonean 
easily defeat either man without half trying, as can also McAullffe. 
Joe is soon to atari East, to go under the tutelage of Hilly Madden, 
who will teach him something about sparring. Madden thinks that 
after he has trained McA ulille six months he will be a world-bealer, 
ami Madden is rarely oil' in his estimate of a man's capabilities as a 
fighter. 

# * * * * 

O'Connor, the champion oarsman of America, is expected to ar- 
rive almost any day. lie will have a hearty welcome, no matter if 
he did swoop down on California's coin in his match with Peterson, 
and if the match he has arranged with Jake Gaudaur for next month 
is to be a bona fide one, he can count on a big crowd. Gaudaur will 
be here shortly, as will Teenier, who is on his way to Australia to 
row Searle in pursuance with the articles signed for him by Edward 
Hanlan. 

McAlester& Jones, Real Estate Agents and Rent Collectors: Office 
422 Montgomery street. The best regulated office in the city. Men of expert, 
ence, having studied the wants of landlords aud tenants for 28 years; reli- 
able, prompt aud responsible iu the management of real estate, renting, 
selling aud collecting, and taking full charge of propert y at lowest rates. 

NEW BALDWIN THEATRE. 

Handsomest Theatre in America. Absolutely Safe. 
Lessee and Proprietor, Mr. Al. Hayman | Acting Manager, Alfred Bouvier 
Last Week but One. CARLETON OPERA COMPANY. This (Saturday) 
Evening— Last Time— Carletou's Famous 

HVEIZEC AIDO I 
And Saturday Matiuee, the Ever Beautiful 

Next Week— Last Week of the Oarleton Company— Monday, Tuesday and 
Wednesday Evenings and Saturday Matinee, 

Thursday Night— By Request, 

MiirnsriEiiaEiEK, J"A:r>r! 

Seats for Next Week now ready. Next Attraction— MODJESKA. |_ J flQ - 1 9 - 

Trand OPERA HOUSE. " 

Mr. Al. Hayman Lessee and Manager 

Last Two Weeks of the Kiralfy Season. Every Evening (including Sun- 
day). Saturday Matinee. Great Success! IMRE KIRALFY'S Famous 
Spectacular Drama, The 

BLACK CBOOKI 

The Famous Operetta Ballet ! Stalactic Revels ! The Princesses of the 

Mr, the Ougar Sisters! Mous. Arnold, the Great Grotesque! The Dare 

Brothers— Bibb and Bobb. 

Prices— 25c, 50c, 75c aud $1. No higher. 

Secure your seats in advance aud avoid the crush. [Jan. 19. 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Kreling Bros . . Sole Proprietors aud Managers 

Farewell Eugagemeut of Siguor Eurico Campobello. Flotow's Ever 
Popular Lyric Opera, 

MARTHA. 
Or, THE FAIR AT RICHMOND. 
The Entire Personnel of the Tivoli Opera Company! Grand Chorus and 
Orchestra. 
Monday Evening, January 21, 1889— Last week of the Grand Opera Season, 

XjA TIRA^XATA I 
Signora Ida Valerga aud Signor Campobello. 
OUR POPULAR PRICES— 25c and 50c. [Jan. 19. 

ALCAZAR THEATRE. 

Geo. Wallbnrod Sole Manager 

This (Saturday) Evening, January 19th; Entire Week; Matinee Saturday. 
Magnificent Revival of Clay M. Green's Melodrama, 

t:h::e ooijiDiELTsr g-iaustt.. 

Characters by Geo. Osbourue, L. R. Stockwell aud the Alcazar Theatre Com" 
pany. New and Realistic Scenery. 

Evening Prices— 25, 50 and 75c. 

Next-KATE MAYHEW in 

ZFAIDsTCIHIOlsri fJau. 19. 



BIJOU THEATRE. 

729 Market Street, - - - Opposite Graut Avenue. 

J. T. Wayman - Manager and Treasurer 

EMERSON'S MORIARITY ! ONE WEEK ONLY I 
Will Reopen Saturday, January 19th, with the popular favorite, BILLY 
EMERSON, and His New Troupe of MINSTRELS, under the management 
of Mr. N. D. Roberts. 

Popular Prices. [Jan. it*. 



MRS. DORA GRAY DUNCAN, 

PIANO-FORTE TEACHER, 
Is prepared to furnish Piano-jorte Music for Balls, Parties, Musicales, etc. 
Other Instrumental Music also provided if desired. 
Address— 1365 Eighth Street (Center Station), Oakland: 

Care of Bruen's Music Store. Broadway, Oakland; 

Or care of Matthias Gray Co., 206 Post Street, S. F. [Dec. 15. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 19, 1889. 



y-A OBE 
the 

(A lon 



BOOKS AND AUTHORS. 

OBERT LOUIS STEVENSON is expected in New York about 
e first of February. His health has been improved by his 
rtg holiday and the change of climate, and he promises to 
\_ resume his literary work as soon as he reaches his home. 
* # * * 

" The Tory's Daughter, " by A. G. Riddle, is a rather clever novel, 
with a decidedly Cooperesque flavor. The story lies along the Erie 
shore daring the troublesome times of 1812, and the stirring incident 
is treated with considerable skill. 

* * * # # 

H. Rider Haggard has become a vegetarian. He espouses the the- 
ory that to starve the tlesh is to nourish the spirit, and says he found 
that his former meat diet retarded his imagination. Mr. Haggard 
never struck us as deficient in this quality, but now that he means to 
subsist on cereals and garden greens, he may be able to write a novel ( ?) 
beside whose lurid pages "She" will appear the tame evolution 
of beef and mutton for dinner. 

***** 

11 The Witch In The Glass," S. M. B. Piatt's little volume of verse, 
comes very nearly under the head of juvenile publications, as so 
many of the dainty verses are addressed to children. It is exquisitely 
bound in creamy silk, sprayed delicately with wild roses and printed 
on pages of the finest texture. 

* * * * * 
Robert Browning claims that he wrote " Lady Geraldine's Court- 
ship," a poem of over four hundred lines, within two consecutive 

hours. 

***** 

In the " Florence Fables," Mr. William J. Florence, the well-known 
comedian, appears in an entirely different character from any with 
which he has made us familiar on the stage, or even the one he shows 
to his intimates off the boards. The " Florence Fables '' are, for the 
most part, not only sombre, but tragic — a strange quality, it seems, 
to emanate from the pen of this mirthful actor and greatest of prac- 
tical jokers. 

***** 

" The American Commonwealth," by Professor James Bryce, has 
received a three-column tribute from the pen of '' Nym Crinkle," 
who, indeed, gives book and author only their just deserts in pro- 
nouncing this work a masterpiece of fairness and accuracy, and a 
liberal and truthful estimate of the American people and the Ameri- 
can government. It is certainly a remarkable book to have come 
from the pen of an Englishman, and so strongly is it approved in 
America that prominent publishers have refused to issue a cheap, 
piratical edition in this country. 

***** 

Frank R. Stockton, says an exchange, is a small, wiry man, with 
electric eyes and a swarthy complexion. He measures you in his 
mind's eye much as a tailor does from tip to toe. He seldom speaks 
above a subdued conversational whisper, and never until spoken to. 
His copy is legible as print, and singularly free from erasions. In 
his library at Madison, N. J., he has a hammock, in which he thinks 
out his ideas, and he will, if necessary, spend three days in writing 
200 words; hence the mosaic perfection of his works. He will not 
write a short story for less than $1,000. 

*»***# 

" For Faith and Freedom," Walter Besant's last novel, is full of 
spirit and dramatic interest, and is written around and about a fine 
point in ethics, which, after breathlessly following the hero through 
the fire, the reader is left to solve to his own satisfaction. The scene 
is laid in England, during the time of the Monmouth rebellion 
whicn plunges all the principal characters of the story into depths of 
disaster. These characters are all consistent, delicately and distinct- 
ly drawn. The dialogue never becomes stilted or wearisome, and the 
novel is well thought out and well written from first page to last. 
***** 

Mrs. Coombs, the author of " As pommon Metals," has written a 
new story, ■■ The Garden of Medara," which is a tale of Roman life, 
and the result of several months of study in Italy. Mrs. Coombs is 
c msidered clever socially, converses agreeably, has a gift for dressing 
well, and acknowledges that she "is perfectly devoted to pretty 
gowns." 

***** 

Mr. Grant Allen's book, " This Mortal Coil," is as disagreeable as 
it is interesting. He writes cleverly, but he writes, in this case, 
about the most evil and odious of egotists, ar.d the reader is carried 
along, even through incident r. ther too melodramatic for the discrim- 
inating mind, by the skill of the author, but protesting all the way. 

* * * * * 

" Ouida " has recently been giving receptions at her villa, where, 
garbed in black velvet, she has received the curious few. She will 
never be noticed socially, and probably does not care so much about 
it now, although at one time she revenged herself bitterly enough by 
writing up, or rather carving up, the haughty Florentine women who 
refused her an entree into their salons. Ouida has taken to dressing 
her hair, for the first time in her life. She has always worn it float- 
ing over her shoulders a Ving&nue, but her forty-five years possibly 
suggested, even to her prejudiced mind, the advisability of a more 
dignified coiffure. 



RECKLESS DRIVING. 

One of the most reckless and brutal instances of fast driving ever 
witnessed in San Francisco was that of William Linehan and his 
brother on Sunday afternoon on the corner of Bush and Polk streets, 
by which Edna J. Frazer, a little child, was run over and killed, the 
two brutes in the wagon driving on immediately after the accident, 
leaving the child lying in the street. Linehan, the driver, was ar- 
rested and admitted to bail in a thousand dollars, which would seem 
to call for investigation as well as the crime itself. The defendant 
keeps a dairy at the Five-Mile House, and was driving home at a 
rapid gait when he drove over the child. These exhibitions of reck- 
less driving call for stern repression on the part of the police. It is 
a frequent sight to see pedestrians at crossings in danger from furi- 
ous driving, and a common sound to hear some brute holding the 
reins yell out in a threatening voice if people do not get out of his 
way soon enough to suit his drunken whim. The law declares the 
crossings to belong to pedestrians within reasonable bounds, and also 
prohibits the horse of one team from approaching within ten feet of 
the rear of the team in advance; but what officer ever interferes to 
prevent this law from being violated? It is only a few weeks since 
the writer of this paragraph saw a well-dressed man in front of the 
Baldwin, in crossing the street, nearly run down by one of these bru- 
tal milkmen; but he stepped back just in season to escape with his 
life, when the driver trailed his whip across his face with a leer on 
his own as he drove rapidly by. The gentleman followed, evidently 
intending to call an officer, when the milkman jumped from his 
team, knocked him down three times, and then leaped on his wagon 
and drove rapidly away before the victim could ascertain his number. 
All this happened between the Baldwin and the Tivoli, and no ar- 
rests were made. It is high time that some limit was placed to the 
reckless brutality of all drivers, whether of milk wagons or other 
vehicles. Mining-town methods are no longer admissible in San 
Francisco. It is to be hoped that the law will punish Edna Frazer's 
murderer. 



xzeststtir^^ciki. 




Insurance Company 

CAPITAL $,000,000, | ASSETS $2,250,000. 

D, J. STAPLES, President. I WILLIAM J. DUTTON, Secretarv 

ALPHEUS BULL, Vice-President. | B. FAYMONVILLE, Ass't Secretary. 

Agents in all prominent localities throughout the United S tates. [Aug. 25. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

ORGANIZED 1864. 

Principal Office 216 Sansome Street 

FIRE INSURANCE. 
Capital Paid Up in U. S. Gold Coin. $300,000.00 

Losses p'd since organi'n. $2, 667,366.43 I Reinsurance Reserve . .? 230 330 36 

Assets January 1, 1888 816,627.14 Net Surplus(overev'ryth'g) 277 963 78 

Su rplus for policy holders.. 808,294.14 [ Income in 1887 354^683.66 

OFFICERS: 

J.F.HOUGHTON President I CHAS. R. STORY Secretary 

J. L. N. SHEPARD,. . -Vice-President I R. H. MAGILL General \gent 

Directors of the Home Mutual Insurance Co.— L. L. Baker, H. L. Dodge 
J. L. N. Shepard John Curry, J. F. Houghton, John Sinclair, C. Waterhouse" 
Chauncey Taylor, S. Huff, C. T. Ryland, A. K. P. Harmon. [March 3. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS.... PORT COSTA, California 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain stored in Warehouses 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class Companies, or Grain sold if 
desired, at current rates. 

Office of the Company, 413 FINE ST., San Francisco, Cal. [Nov. 19. 

A6GREGATE ASSETS, $46,000,000- 

London Assurance Corporation of London [Established by Roval 

Charter 1720.] 
Northern Assurance Company of London [Established 1836.] 
Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool [Established 1867.] 
Connecticut Fire Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 
S. E. Cor. California and Montgomery Streets. Safe Deposit Building. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. . 

Capital Subscribed $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up j t 000, 000 

Reserve Fund (in addition to Capital) 2, 125, 000 

Total Assets July 1, 1887.. 5,809,629 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 
July 16.] 305 California Street, San Francisco. 



Jan. 19, 18M». 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



L8 



EARLY FRISCO REM2NISCENCES.-XXVI. 

UOKING back at the *80 decado, tunny things ooma up tn the 
Blind m happening during thai time which seem almost In- 
=d dispensable us appropriate events to record, yel :i few ol being 
J \ prohx natunillv Buggeats a judicious sitting. What one per- 
son might consider matters of interest, another person would 
not; so much depends on the persona] interest. An occurrence 
which would Include a reference t" s certain person, or number of 
persons, wootd be <>t some interest to them, and possibly i<> no one 
line. On the other hand, the possessors of names not mentioned a 
however trivial the event which includes them may be, are apt tu 
regard these rominiacenoes as incomplete if they are omitted. 
• • • ■ * 

An event decidedly worth recording is the first appearance of street 
railroads and oars En Ban Francisco. Previous to 1881, omnibuses 

ran from North Beaofa to South Part, the route being along Powell 
to Filbert, to Stockton, to Washington, to Montgomery, to Market, 

to Third and on to South Park, the return route being merely a re- 
fine. There were also stages running to the Mission Dolores, starl- 
ing from the l'la/a, and going out Kearny, Market and Folsom. The 
first horse-car road to start was the " Omnibus " line, controlled by 
the owners ol the old omnibuses. Its initial trip was made on the 
tir-t of January, »;i. Following after, in '62, came the North Beach 
and Mission line. Originally there were turnouts on Kearny street 
for the cars, as there are still on Montgomery. 

• • * » * 

If my memory is not at fault, when the North Beach and Mission 
line first began it ran only along the Mission branch, and only a por 
tion of that. It started from the corner of California and Montgom- 
ery streets, and ran along California, Buttery, First and Folsom out 
to Fourth street. The road was not opened at first beyond Fourth 
on Folsom, and it did not cross Montgomery street on California 
for some time. I well remember the excitement occasioned by the 
starting and arriving of the first cars from and at the corner of Mont- 
gomery and California. Later, when the Kearny street and North 
Beach division was opened, the California street division had a sort 
Of omnibus-shaped cars which were drawn by one horse and turned 
on a pivot. These were the pioneers of the " balloon " cars, which ; 
followed them on the Larkin street branch of the Sutter street road 

some years later. 

* • • * « 

My impression is that for some time the cars of this line went no 
further than Stockton street, near O'Farrell. 

a • # • * 

The third line to start was the Central. This was in about '63. For 
a long time the cars started from the corner of Bush and Montgom- 
ery, upper side. The cars then ran up Bush street to Dupont, and 
along Dupont to Post, and thence, as the line goes now. along Stock- 
ton and Geary to Taylor. In '64-'5 the terminus of the Central road 
was on Taylor street, below Eddy. This part of the city was but 
sparsely settled at the time, and it was almost like going out to the 
Park to-day— if, indeed, not more so — to take a ride to the end of the 
Central road. In time the line was opened through up Turk street, 
and out along Sixth. 

There were no one-horse bob-tails in those days. If I am not mis- 
taken, the first bob-tail was run on Woodward's line along Mission 
street. The" balloon " cars already mentioned were a different breed 
of dogs." 

****** 

Cable cars were first introduced on the Clay street road. This was 
early in the seventies— September, 1873. The next cable line was the 
Sutter street, which had been running as a horse line since I860. In 
1875 the line was altered into a cable road. For some time, up to 
1878 or 1879, the cable division of the Sutter street road ended at the 
corner of Sutter and Larkin streets. At that point you were trans- 
ferred into horse cars, which went along Polk street in one direction 
to Union, or along Larkin street down to Market. The cable contin- 
uation up Sutter street, and also along Larkin, was then opened. 
****** 

The Geary street line was started in 1880. However, this period is 
too nearly within the recollection of " New Timers " to warrant any 
further notice from an old one. 

******* 

Baseball, which of late years has acquired such gigantic propor- 
tions in the land, was in early days comparatively, if not quite un- 
known in California. Rounders was the great ball game at school 
and in the streets, unfrequented thoroughfares being often occupied 
by boys for a game. I remember, on many an occasion, playing 
rounders on Sutter street, above Powell, and on Pine street, between 
Mason and Taylor. It is true that then Pine street, at this point, 
was no more than an ungraded sand lot. But imagine such a thing 
now ! The first baseball club — I write from pure unassisted memory, 
and therefore under correction— was the Red Rovers, organized 
about 1858 or 1859. I do not remember any of the members. Then 
came the Eagles. The Eagles may really be called the pioneers and 
fathers of the game on the Pacific Coast. They had an elaborate 
club-room for meetings on Clay street, below Montgomery, adopted 
a uniform, rather quaint compared with the uniforms of to-day, and 
played the game in strict accordance with the latest rules. 



THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871.] 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up 1400,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 218 AND 220 SANSOME 8TREET, 

San Francisco, California. 
tiEOKUH L. BKANDEK, CHA8. 11. CU8HINQ, P. J. WHITE, 

President. Secretary. Woe-President. 

Board of Directors— 1>. Callaghau, P. J. White. J. M. Donahue, OBO, 

L. KrauiJrr, E, L. Goldstein, L. Cunulughain, M. Kauu, Planer Ames l>r 

C. K. Buckley. Dr. Wm. Joues, G. II. Wheaton, T. McMulliu, II. H. Wataon 

H. Dimoud, P. Bolaud. | Sept. 1. 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

CAPITAL, Paid in Full s 200.000.00 

ASSETS, December 31. 1887 ... 434.194.76 

LOSSES Paid Since Company was Organized 1.846.704.24 

JOHN H. WISE, President. 
CHAS. A. Laton, Secretary. 

Principal Office 439 California Street, 

(Safe Deposit Buildiug). [March 10.] San Francisco, Cal. 

THE SOUTH BRITISH 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW ZEALAND. 

capital si 0.0o0.u 

Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

Office— 213 and 215 Sansome Street San Francisco, 

A. 6. MTJRHAY, Manager. 

London Office — No. 2 Royal Exchange Auenue, Cornhill, E. C. [March 6. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $9,260,000 

Cash Assets 2,764.875 

Cash Assets In United States 1 ,398,546 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

GENERAL AGENTS, 
316 California Street. San Francisco. March20. 

ANGLO-NEVADA ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

FIRE AND MARINE.— Capital, Fully Paid, s2, 000,000. 
OFFICE, 410 PINE STREET. 

Bankers: THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

[8ept. 10.1 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 



CAPITAL 



..?5,0OO,O00 



AGENTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

Nov. 18 1 No. 316 California Street. San Francisco. 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1782.] 
American Fire Insurance Co. of New York [Estab. 1857.] 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
July 16.; 413 California Street, San Francisco. 

THE EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY, 

Assets $84,378,905 

Surplus $18,104,255 

This Society pays about five million dollars annually to the widows and 
orphans of deceased policy-holders. 

NORTH & SNOW, Managers for Pacific Coast, 

Oct. 27.1 405 Montgomery Street, 3. F. 

"IhTsWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

SWITZERLAND of Zurich— Capital, 5,000,000 Francs. HELVETIA of St. 
Gall— Capital, 10,000,000 Francs. BALOISE of Basle— Capital, 5,000,000 Francs. 
These three companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that 
may be sustained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the 
world In the settlement of all claims under an English policy, these com- 
panies will strictly adhere to the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds' 
and submit to English jurisdiction. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 410 California 
street, San Francisco. [June 9.J 



THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

CAPITAL JIO.000,000. 

INGHAM Genet 

420 California Street, «»S Francisco, Cal. [March 19 



CAPITAL 110,000,000. 

W. J. CALLINGHAM General Agent, 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 19, 1889. 



supervisor Mcdonald's resignation. 

The resignation of Supervisor McDonald, if it be pushed no 
further, will have been productive of good. It has called attention, 
in the most conspicuous way possible, to the trend things are likely 
to take under the new Board, and„to the extent to which public 
attention has been called to the subject, a substantial service has 
been rendered. That a ring has been formed to put things through to 
suit themselves admits of but little doubt. When a man like Super- 
visor McDonald is removed from the Finance and Fire Department 
committees, no doubt need be entertained of what is meant. The 
ring expects to incur expenditures and do things which it is known 
in advance Supervisor McDonald would not sanction. To the Fire 
Department, as run by Lieutenant Boss Rainey, the Supervisor from 
the Second is known to be specially objectionable. He has a way of 
looking into matters that prevents pickings and stealings. Until his 
advent in office somebody was always allowed large commissions on 
purchases for the Fire Department. He put an end to that kind of 
business, and that is why an end has now been put to him. To 
accomplish that purpose, the appointment ot the committees was 
taken out of the hands of the Mayor, and the action of the ring shows 
that there was a predetermined policy not conceived iu the public 
interests. The Boss dictated it. The uninitiated may wonder that 
Supervisor McDonald was permitted to be renominated for election to 
the Board ; but that is a way the Boss has. Mr. McDonald was too 
strong a man to attempt to " down " with safety; besides, two or three 
known honest men are always put on the ticket to make it look well, 
and to carry through the unknown rascals. That is why McDonald was 
put there. Having served that purpose of the Boss, he would make 
the worst kind of a mistake in further serving that individual by per- 
sisting in his resignation. It is his duty to fill out the term for which 
the people so handsomely elected him. He agreed to serve, and, in 
our judgment, cannot now honorably break faith with the city. 

FACTS FOR LEGISLATORS. 

It is one of the known facts of journalism hereabouts that the 
dailies are under such obligations to the " upper office " for the police 
news of the day that they dare not exercise their functions as censors 
in regard to any matter in which the police are interested. It is an 
unhappy fact, but it is a fact nevertheless. The press being thus muz- 
zled and the police officials, by a curious conjunction of circumstances, 
being given a perpetual tenure of office without responsibility to 
anybody, we witness the strangest sight ever presented under a popu- 
lar form of goverment. The most important public functionaries 
within the municipality have had a beginning but may not have an 
ending. Nobody can remove them, call them to account, or success- 
fully question their authority, no matter how shamefully it may be 
exercised. As we have seen they may not even be seriously criticised 
by the daily press, which is dependent upon them for its most im- 
portant news feature. In a Government by, through and for the peo- 
ple, we have a power above and beyond the reach of the people. In 
the very nature of things such a power is bound to become corrupt 
and dangerous, and that is precisely what the Police Department of 
this city now is and long has been. This the dailies know perfectly 
well, and it is safe to say that with one powerful exception they are 
all secretly in favor of that department being rendered amenable to 
some sort of control. It is impossible to resist the argument that a 
menacing and dangerous police oligarchy should have a limit set to 
its tenure of office. There is a subversion of our entire form of gov- 
ernment until that is done. That so monstrous a condition has be- 
come powerful enough to pervert the utterances of the press is the 
best evidence that an intolerable state of affairs exists for which a 
remedy cannot too soon be found. 



WHO SHALL APPOINT? 
Senator Yell has introduced a bill, the passage of which cannot 
be resisted by any known process of honest and fearless reasoning. 
It proposes to cure a very glaring defect in existing statutes. If the 
Supreme Court, as it was constituted some years ago, was right — 
which we have never yet admitted and do not now believe — there 
was no limit to the tenure of certain public officers, and no way of 
putting and end to it. That being the decision of the Court of last 
resort, it had to be submitted to. Senator Yell's bill is intended to 
provide a means whereby that section of the Constitution shall be 
rendered operative which says, in effect, that no State or municipal 
officer shall hold for a longer period than four years without re- 
election or re-appointment. The trouble is that no way now exists 
of determining who shall exercise the appointing power in certain 
cases. That is how it comes that our police upper office is perpetual. 
Senator Yell proposes that the power to appoint shall be vested in 
the Supervisors of each city and county. Theoretically he is right. 
The Supervisors are the duly elected representatives of the people, 
chosen for the express purpose of regulating municipal affairs. To 
doubt them is to distrust the people. To set them aside for any ap- 
pointed Board or Commission is to discredit popular sovereignty and 
set it aside. But the Mayor is also a popularly elected official and 
the experience is that the people generally succeed better in electing 
a good Mayor than an honest Board of Supervisors. There would be 
no objection to the appointing power being in his hands. It cannot 
too soon be placed somewhere. Until it is the Legislature acknowl- 
edges itself impotent, and meanwhile a gross outrage upon the rights 
of the people continues to be perpetrated in San Francisco. 



THE SAMOAN DIFFICULTY. 
What Secretary Bayard has determined to do in regard to the 
Samoan difficulty is clear enough. There is no question ot war at all 
about the matter, the sensational dailies to the contrary notwith- 
standing. There is no question in dispute, and consequently nothing 
to go to war over. The Governments of the United States and of 
Germany are in entire accord in regard to the independence of 
Samoa. There happens to be, at this time— as there has frequently 
been before— a tribal war going on between the adherents of two rival 
chiefs, and, naturally, the treaty powers having citizens with large 
interests at Apia, are anxious that they shall be protected. The Ger- 
man Minister at Washington, acting under instructions from his 
Government, has assured Secretary Bayard that the treaty rights of 
the United States and of the treaty powers will be " respected under 
all circumstances." That is clear, beyond misapprehension, and 
leaves nothing further to be desired on that point. The German 
Minister asks Secretary Bayard to " join in devising some way to re- 
store calm and quiet to the Islands." The Secretary replies, accept- 
ing the invitation, and stating that in consequence thereof, " Rear Ad- 
miral Kimberley, commanding our naval forces in the Pacific, has 
been ordered to proceed in his warship. Trenton, to Apia. I have 
great confidence in his wisdom and benevolent discretion, as well as 
in that of the naval commanders of other national vessels, which 
have been sent by the respective Governments to Samoan waters to 
promote satisfactory arrangements in the spirit of comity which in- 
duced your Government to invite the active co-operation of the 
United States in restoring law and order." From all of which it is 
apparent that the relations between ourselves and Germany are of a 
most amicable character, and that both parties are engaged in a 
mission of peace. 

A POINT WELL TAKEN. 
Now comes the " Examiner " and complains of the Call, and for 
cause of action alleges that its contemporary has wickedly, and with 
malice aforethought, sought to hold it responsible for the expressions 
of opinions on the so-called labor problem credited in its columns to 
the people it has interviewed. The Examiner repudiates the opinions 
and its responsibility therefor. It says that if it were the Call that 
were so charged the case would be very different. That journal, it 
says, takes care that the opinions expressed in the interviews it pub- 
lishes agree with its own, and declines to use any others. That being 
its policy, it of course would have no right to complain at being in- 
dentified with the views it selects for publication. But that would ob- 
viously be a very unfair rule to apply to a journal which lets all 
shades of opinion find expression whether it coincides with them or 
not. The point is well taken. The Examiner is right, Interviewing 
is a valuable adjunct to the live journalism of the period, but it is a 
sham, a delusion and a snare if the interviewed are to be allowed no 
independence of thought, bat are to be invariably compelled to shape 
their opinions to accord with those known to be held by the paper 
seeking to use them. The public desire to know, and frequently have 
a great interest in learning exactly what certain men think in regard 
to matters upon which they can speak with authority. The journal 
that furnishes them with an audience is responsible only for the cor- 
rectness of its report, and not for the views they express, unless it 
editorially declares otherwise. The weakness of the interviewing sys- 
tem is that it makes men say things they never said in order to gain 
the weight of their authority to help along some set purpose the in- 
terviewing journal has in view. In that case it is a cheat, a decep- 
tion and a fraud, and that is just what published interviews too fre- 
quently are. 

CONTEMPTS OF COURT. 

The time is at hand when contempts of court will have to be 
defined by statute. At present the judge is clothed with the extra- 
ordinary power of df termining what he will consider a contempt of 
himself. This power we have inherited from the long-established 
practice in England, where it has always been felt that it is so diffi- 
cult to determine what may or may not be an obstruction of the 
court's proceedings that it is better to leave the whole matter to the 
determination of the judges, who can be depr-nded on to be wise and 
discreet in the exercise of exceptional authority. They know that 
the abuse of their powers would soon lead to their being taken away. 
But men are finding their way on to the judicial bench in the United 
States, especially in the new States and Territories, who can be more 
surety relied upon to make an ill-advised use of their power to pun- 
ish for contempt than a judicious one calculated to command the 
respect of the community. Judge Barnes, of the United States Court 
of Arizona, would seem to be a judicial officer of that kind. He 
recently hauled before him S. C. Bogg, proprietor of the Tombstone 
Prospector, and fined him $300 for an editorial expression of opinion 
that mentioned no names, criticised no pending litigation, and con- 
tained nothing upon which a libel suit could have been founded. 
The objectionable words were these ; " The county ring is being aug- 
mented by the initiation into the mysteries of the order of those high 
in office, who should halt before dragging their judicial ermine into 
the slime of political bias." This the judge considered a reflection 
upon himself, declared it a contempt of court, and fined the luckless 
editor the amount stated. It is clear that Judge Barnes is not a fit 
man to intrust with the large powers conferred upon judicial officers. 
He should be required to step down and out. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTER. 



16 



' Bear Um Crier! " " What the Jwil nrt ihon ' " 
" Oue that will play the devil, air, with you." 



M 



OW, tete-a-tete, we sit at last, 

And while l help the salad, 
Ma belle dime, with eyes downcast. 
Hums o'er my favorite ballad, 
And says: " On, love, are we not wise 
To steal these hours from sorrow? 
Anil quaff the cap, as old Time Hies, 
With no care for the morrow? " 
By Jove, these chops are finely broiled; 

How fresh tho>e uutereresses. 
I hope the capon is not spoiled— 

But no, the fume confesses, 
Now wafted through onr door, ajar, 

So free from all dis-savor, 
That rises still, our lucky star. 
To bless that capon's flavor. 

Pier soft white hand she lays in mine, 

The while we chink our glasses, 
And whispers: " In our grand design, 

Each moment, as it passes. 
Is freighted, dear, with love of you— 

Philosopher, who brought me 
To separate the false from true. 

And still, unwearying, taught me 

■' That life is not a place to sigh, 

That joy is as w r e make it, 
That merriment goes hurrying by, 

And, if we'd overtake it, 
We have no time to mourn the past, 

No time to pause or linger "— 
The waiter coughs outside the door — 

I raise a warning finger. 

Oh, capons, that we twain have eat! 

Oh. snug dens where we 've tarried 
In converse, close and long and sweet! 

But, now. alas! she 's married. 
And when we meet on street or mart 

(She still delights in feeding)— 
She bows, I bow, no sign of heart, 
, But all is perfect breeding. 

Senator Murphy, a brainy little man, has taken the lead in the 
Legislature in the introduction of bills. One of Mr. Murphy's bills 
provides for the pensioning of superannuated policemen. I might 
suggest that there should be a rider to that bill ordiining that the 
widows and orphans of all inoffensive citizens shot down or clubbed 
to death by the police, be entitled to a pension from that same fund. 
Thus would the bill receive the approbation of all sensible people, 
and the glory of Murphy, the law giver, hold its own even with Mo- 
ses arid Eycurgus. Senator Murphy's second bill provides for the es- 
tablishment of a new police courc to deal exclusively with Jury cases. 
1 look forward to the time when trial by jury shall come to be regard- 
ed as a relic of the barbaric past. I should like to hear something 
from Senator Murphy on this question, some good, strong language 
declaring that trials by haphazard juries fail to attain the end aimed 
at, and that three intelligent judges on the bench after hearing the 
testimony for the prosecution and defense, can better declare the 
guilt or innocence of the prisoner than forty citizens lug^ d by a depu- 
ty sheriff from the streets. 

I should recommend Brother Moody to persuade Judge Murphy 
that he has a distinct vocation for the ministry. When Judge 
Murphy was a simple District Attorney he was a bluff, blusterous 
sort of prosecuting officer, who sat down upon a criminal without 
any regard for his feelings, and looked upon a witness for the defense 
as a soulless ruffian who should be crushed out of existence. Now 
the Judge is mild as zebra's milk, and his lectures to the convicted 
criminal have the odor of new-mown hay. He coos softly to the 
poor wretch in the dock and gives him, in addition to his sentence, a 
dose of wisdom, which so demoralizes the miserable recipient that he 
begs to be taken out to the court corridor and hanged on the spot. 
Therefore do I think that Moody and Murphy would make a good 
revivalist team, and, moreover, the names would look well on the 
bills. 

The " Examiner " proposes to carry any number of laborers free 
to the southern country to pick the raisins and make the grapemen 
happy ; but it has nothing to say about taking them back. This is 
one of the reasons why the unemployed tight shy of the Examiner's 
labor train. He cannot endure the idea of being planted far, far 
away from the lunch counter in some inhospitablecountry, and have 
the Examiner's brakemen incontinently fire him off when he strug- 
gles to return to the fleshpots of Egypt. 



The Customs and the Quarantine are at war. Colonel John 
Fogarty has put on his shirt of mail and baa challenged Major 
and Doctor McAllister to mortal combat, " It is better," aaya 
Colonel Fogarty, " that there should be tifty ouee of small poi than 
have one bale of silk smuggled ashon- without the payment of duty." 
" It \s belter." >ay> Major McAllister, • that all the silk in the ship 
should be Bhoved ashore than I should be exposed to bedevil men I <-i 
the press and Board of Health if any fellow with tin- appalling pus- 
tule upon him wanders along the water-front." Henoe, tbls great 
conflict of authority. Thebest way to decide this most seriou 
troversy would be to have Doctor and Major McAllister vaccinate 
Colonel John Fogarty, and, as soon as the operation whs finished, ac- 
cord Colonel John Fogarty the privilege of vaccinating Major and 
Doctor McAllister. The result would be that the City and County Ol 
San Francisco would be deprived of its Quarantine otlicer and Deputy- 
Surveyor for many months to come. 

The experience of Mr. Bishop is an old story. Two gentlemen 
sold a piece of land to Mr. Bishop, giving him the promise that they 
would lay out a beautiful public park opposite his property. Mr. 
Bishop departed to speculate in other climes, dreaming that upon 
his return the park trees would be well grown, the fountains playing 
and beautiful nursery maids conducting their charges along the 
winding avenues to the aforesaid park. The two real-estate gentle- 
men did nothing of the kind; in fact, they did quite otherwise. They 
let the park idea go to the dickens, and started in to build houses for 
rent to an unpicturesque class of tenantry. Naturally, Mr. Bishop 
is mad. But bless you, Mr. Bishop, if your Episcopacy knew as 
much about the wiles and guiles of real-estate agents as I do, you 
would not have believed in the park proposition until you saw the 
gardeners planting the daffy-down-dillies and fished with a bent pin 
in the marble fountain for the golden carp. 

Officer Harry Hook took a flying shot at a sneak thief one day 
this week, and a fragment of lead landed in the eye of an over-inquis- 
itive citizen. This is an illustration of the case of the pitcher that 
goes too often to the well coming to grief at last. Policemen have 
been so accustomed to consider the thoroughfares of San Francisco 
as their target grounds that they have never hesitated to draw a bead 
on any sort of a fugitive, without reflecting that bullets travel far, 
and have no intelligence beyond simple direction. Possibly about 
the best method to avoid possible accident is for every un.irmed citi- 
zen, the moment he marks the approach of a policeman at any gait 
faster than a walk, to slap up his iron shutters and adjourn with his 
family to the cellar until the leaden hail is over. 

The number of legislators who have sworn to go to the Paris 
Exposition this year are getting a little impatient at the delay in 
Sacramento of anything like the arrival of a big sack. No danger, 
however, of it not turning up in time. It is written in the stars that 
this year will see the State treasury suffer, and this fiat is inexorable. 
But what a horrible calamity it would be if, for some reason or other, 
nobody wanted to rob the State this year, and our lawmakers would 
have simply to earn their money, without the possibility of a dime 
on the outside. It would do more to check political ambition than 
anything that could occur in this State for a century. 

The suicide of Mr. Horatio Moro, the young British Hebrew who 
cut his throat with his own razors, should be a warning to young 
Englishmen of that persuasion who come to this coast. Moro, after 
spending an hour at the Bohemian club, listening to the jokes and 
stories of those gay lads, was overcome with despondency, and he cut 
his throat. The tragic character of this melancholy incident did not 
end here. He was attended by two trained nurses, he was cablegram- 
ed about, and the result was he died. Now, had he been a poor, un- 
known tramp, whom nobody took any interest in, he might have cut 
an inch deeper and have been a well man to-day. 

There is a lamentable dearth of issues just now. We used to have 
a gas issue, a witer issue aud a railroad issue. All these have disap- 
peared, so perforce we are compelled to fall back upon our Super- 
visors, and find out what approach the new gang has selected for its 
march upon the city's sack. For march it will as long as the tide 
ebbs and flows in the Golden Gate. And he who does not march, but 
turns up his nose at peculation, is regarded by the brigands as an 
imbecile, fit for the asylum for the insane. 

Faint echoes of something about to be done in regard to a new 
postoffice are heard from Washington. Now, taking everything into 
consideration, I'd back the new postoffice to beat the City Hail, al- 
though the ground has not been selected for the former, and the lat- 
ter has had about twenty years' start. 

Miss Veneer, of Van Ness avenue, had a hard time getting ready 
for the party the other evening. Her little brother had mislaid her 
flowers, her maid had mislaid her hair, and she didn't want to go to 
the party labeled a bald-headed daughter of the Golden West. 

Mrs. Langtry had to wade through the snow recently from a the- 
ater in Illinois to her home. Well, snow is cooling, and from all we 
can learn of the career of this estimable lady.it will do her no 
harm. 

"When that Eastern crank ran away from officer Mahoney, the 
other night, and dropped a silver teapot and some odds and ends in 
the line of plated cutlery, he called it the rift in the loot. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 19, 1889. 




|( my news! I'm goin' Eastl I've 

I^fT^^^^TS*^ I keen wan tin' to go for a long while, 

r'iiV^^*^ 2 ^^ J__y 'n Marguerite has just willed 't I 

y^&'P should go along with her. Mrs. 

M'Mullin promised 't she'd take the best kind o' care of me, but Ma 
wouldn't consent till after they'd gone. You see, I just teased her 
so, night 'n day, 't at last she had to give in for the sake o' peace 'n 
quietness. Bui only think o' havin' a fine time to Noo York; 'n then 
Washin'ton, with the inauguration, too! Ain't that lots o' joy for 
your little friend? Ned says, " What on top o' this earth are your 
numerous friends goin' to do without your weekly letter?" But I 
reckon they'll survive— don't you? I don't mean to neglect 'em en- 
tirely, that's sure; 'n whenever anything special turns up in my 
travels 't's likely to interest dear old 'Frisco folks, you'll get a screed, 
never fear. 

The old Judge was polite enough to say 't the naughty society peo- 
ple 't holds Mag in terror Ml break out loose when her quick eye 'n 
sharp tongue is off guard like; but Mag ain't dead, 'n she'll keep 'em 
in mind, you bet, 'n if they don't behave theirselves, why, little Mag 
Ml touch 'em up when she gets back again, that's all. I told Ma 't if 
it was the last act o' my career, I must drop you a au rivers line, 'n 
give you a few notes o' the pink 'n white german (I don't mean Von 
Schroeder, but the Newhall cotillion. Nellie said first thing after we 
got there 't she guessed there 'd been a auction sale of a lot o' tulle 
that day, 'n I couldn't help thinkin' she was right, for there was 
such yards 'n yards of it hangin* from the gas fixtures, on the 
walls, over doors, 'n so forth, till you couldn't rest. Then in between 
the pink 'n white draperies was branches o' green ferns 'n things- 
Most o' the girls gratified Newhall by wearin' the prevailin* colors, 
though a few suited their own tastes— the black-eyed belle, for in- 
stance, and Mrs. Stuart Taylor for another. You bet some o' the 
dark-skinned females was keepin' up a quiet swear to 'emselves, 
when they got peeps in the glass, to see how awful unbecomin' the 
pink was, 'cept to fair wimnien. 

Bean appears to a got huffy. Anyhow, he's goin' off East, too, 'n 
so Ed. Greenaway Ml shine alone, 'n wealthy grateful ones can buy 
more cuff buttons, studs 'n scarf pins, though candor compels me to 
affirm 't wealthy folks don't get stuck that way in general. 

The new figgers 't was no end talked about was real pretty, though 
you should a seen the different ways 't some couples went through 
the paper hoops in the circus act. I tell you it takes agility 'n 
youth to do the jump racket, 'n you'd a pitied some stiff-jointed has- 
beens if you could a seen 'em. When it come to the figger where the 
dancers caught hold o' different ends o' ribbon, 'n at a signal all 
pulled 'n found some one had hold o' the other end o' the piece, I 
asked the Moral belle 't was just ahead o' me if she didn't wish 't all 
reachin' out were as sure of a catch-on, 'n you should a seen how real 
mad she looked ! 

The ci-devant Bossess's fair cheyild made her first appearance since 
her return. She had on a elegant costoom, but somehow she don't 
get much attention. I reckon the men is afraid o' the old woman. 
If I dared I'd tell you of a pronounced flirtation 't went on most o' 
the evenin'. It began some weeks ago, 'n has been rlourishin' like a 
serial novel — " continued in our next " to all the parties, *n teas, 'n 
afternoon promenades. (Mag 's seen 'em, you bet, strollin 1 along, 
dippin' into candy stores 'n takin' dummy rides.) All 't I can say is 
it passes me what fools some wimnien are. With more 'n their share 
o' the good things o' this life they still, like the horse-leech ('t the old 
J udge tells about), cry for more ; 'n the worst part of it is 't it 's what 
comes under the head o' " strictly forbidden " 't attracts 'em the 
most. The old-timer 't used to follow that line since childhood no- 
body seems to mind; whether 'tis 't it is looked upon as her natural 
condition to be fly or not, one thing is sure, 'n that is 't she has the 
gayest kind of a time 'n nobody says 's much 's boo ! She ain't no- 
body's goose, neither. They say 't the chap 't doffed the toga is the 
propellin' power at present, but of that, to use one o' Mrs. Percy Sel- 
by's pet expressions, Quien sabe! Several society beaux had a sort o' 
dazed look, 'n I asked Henry Redington what was the matter (he 's 
of a enquirin' turn o' mind 'n knows what 's goin' on generally, or 
thinks he does), 'n he said 't there was a rumor flllin' the air 't old 
man Fletch was goin' to wed the heiress, 'n so no wonder so many 
fellahs 'ts been livin' on hope should look ready to die o' despair. 

An' now, before I say a lingerin' adoo, I'm goin* to give a sort o' 
valedictory to my special friends, 'n you'll tell 'em, won't you? To 
the amiable Fat Dentist I would say in the words o' Pat, " More 
power to your elbow," 'n in the roh o' Benedict revivous, when you 
draw, draw it mild. Mag's had a lot o' fun with you, given you lots 
o' free ads, 'n made you quite a well known character; in fact, "Mag's 
Fat Dentist" is equally well known in Noo York as here. His con- 
frere, the great original Fat Boy, erstwhile o' the 'Frisco press, has 
gone from our gaze 'n passed into the oblivion where his Jingleside 
preceded him. To the pretty, dimpled favorite, as used to was, Mag 
extends a hearty commendation un the absence of airs which most 
folks bring back from '* furrin parts." Henry Redingt.Qn has the 



earnest advice to make hay while the sun shines, for brotherly love 
don't always continue. The big blonde 'n the dumpy matron o' the 
French colony Ml rest tranquil no doubt till some big show Ml draw 
'em out to pose in the Grand Op'ra House, or chance bring a successor 
to the handsome Italian doctor for their lorgnettes to rest upon. The 
CJasbbag is having such vials o' wrath poured upon her wicked old 
head 't there I leave her. Mag wishes the society fiddler may get up 
one peg higher, but begs him not to get overstrung in his strain for 
social honors, for things snap sometimes, 'n though fiddlers always 
scrape away on one string, it takes a skillful beau to make it endur- 
able. 

The old Judge says he'll have a lot o' riddles all ready for me when 
I come back, but I asked him to give us a special good-bye one. So 
the old fellah kind o' rumpled his hair, 'n says, " What is the differ- 
ence between the Ishmael of Bible history and the Hager of our 
period? Because the former had every man's hand against him— 
and the latter has a tongue against every woman." La me! 

To Tom Bell Mag extends her felicitations upon the pleasant at- 
mosphere of his domestic life. Should any of his friends esteem it 
as bein* of a dusky shade, be can reply with the intelligence 't Sable's 
fashionable this season. 

As within the limits o' this letter it 's just next to impossible to 
tackle all her friends, Mag wishes to bid 'em, one 'nail, a affectionate 
adoo, 'n hope 't when she appears upon the scene again (how's that 
for a toney phrase?) 't they Ml all be alive 'n kickin'. So now to 
yourself, to quote from Shakespeare, " Parting is such sweet sorrow, 
't I would say good-bye until to-morrow." Ned here remarks, "for 
goodness sake, dry up," so I dry, 'n sign myself always 'n for ever 
your little friend, Mag. 

P. S.— P'raps— mind you, I don't say I will, but p'raps — I'll drop 
you a line from Washin'ton, if anything happens worthy o' remark. 
M. 

At the Maison Riche you will find the best 
That can tempt the taste of the toniest guest 
In all the broad and expansive West. 

Messrs. Deutz & Geldermann's 
GRAND VIN d'AY 




GOLD LACK SEC! 

In Magnums, Quarts and Pints, 

OF THE FAMOUS 1884 VINTAGE. 

For Sale in bond or duty paid by 

Charles Meinecke & Co., 

Sole Agents Pacific Coast, 

HAND-MADE SHOES, $8.00. 
FROM THOMAS', LONDON, 

15 New Montgomery St., 



CTnder Qranri Hotel. 



GO TO 

Gk "W. CLAEK & CO.. 
653 Market Street, 

FOR 

WALL PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES, 

i And CORNICE POLES. 

The Larcher & Moe Schools 



LANGUAGES, 



70 Flood Building, Sau Francisco. Hamilton Hall, Oakland. 

Edward Larcher, Theodore M. Moe, Principals. 



Jan. 19, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTER. 



17 



GOTHAM GOSSIP. 

Nim Y"HK. January B, 1890, 
i I 1 11 1: raeant noilaiuenl over tha banting of the Bilectrlo Sugar 
\_ J bobble hu linn a good deal of poatburuona notoriety i" 
^^ ■• Professor" Friend, wilh whom the fraudulent «oheine origi- 
nated, rht Friends an, I the Howards, the family of Mrs. 
Friend, had a superb boine out on Bast Sixtieth street, but 
Iba Professor owned a private stable on Wlty-third street, where be 
kepi twenty-seven One li.>r-e*. an, I a ball doaen handsome oarriages, 

Mi- ha, I a mania lor beinx driven about town, ami in "\>ite of his wcll- 
slookeil atable and numerous private conveyances, In' ran a coupe 1 

I, ill ai on,- ol tin- uptown stables, which averaged two hundred and 
fifty dollar^ a month. When- he drove to is food lor private specula- 
tion hut he used to eall a 00004 early in the morning, keep it nearly 
all day. go home for an hour's sleep in the afternoon, and sally forth 
again on wheels ai dusk, to be gone until morning. Hedrank heavily, 
bul never touched anything but brandy, and he boasted that he spent 
at least one thousand dollars a week, and the greater part of it on 
women. Friend died, probably, of alcoholism, during the blizzard 
of last March. His Funeral was a melancholy cortege of two hired 
sleighs, one bearing the body , and inside the driver, on the box of 
this sleigh-hearse, sat father-in-law Howard. In the sleigh following 
there were two men— naniesunknown— and thus through snow-block- 
ed streets crawled the strangest rich man's funeral ever seen in Go- 
tham town. Of course, when the circumstances were known, they 
provoked inquiry, but no satisfactory reasons were given, although 
Howard sa:,l that the news of Friend's death would have caused un- 
easiness anions; investors in the Electric Sugar scheme. The man 
Howard gained more or less notoriety in New York and Brooklyn as 
a son of revivalist and curb-stone preacher. He spent Sunday nior- 
ninga OH the City Hall steps, whence he exhorted and prayed over 
the rabble with the assistance of a brother in the Lord named Leech. 
Bul in the heart of this g lly man there seems to have been a yearn- 
ing after the flesh pots of Egypt, and after the death of old Friend he 
blossomed forth in diamonds and swell clothes, and gave up his Sun- 
day prayer meetings on the City Hall steps. The widow Friend is 
an immensely fat. coarse-looking woman, who, during her residence 
in New York, made herself vastly conspicuous driving through Cen- 
tral Park, in a low Phaeton, behind a pair of spotted calico horses. 
She sold out her husband's stables for something less than five thou- 
sand dollars, and with the Howards has gone to live at Milan, Michi- 
gan, where it is said they have invested in real estate over three hun- 
dred thousand dollars of " Electric Sugar" moneys. 

Ella Wheeler Wilcox is said to be writinga play, and the announce- 
ment of her dramatic intentions has brought down upon her chest- 
nut head the usual amount of newspaper guying which greets the 
each new effort of the '• Sweet Singer of Michigan." It has been vari- 
ously reported of the forthcoming drama that it will be a " passion 
play," that it will "melt the type." that publishers will not dare print 
it or managers produce it; but a glance backward over the tiery lit- 
erature which has braved the light of day duringthe past year should 
encourage Ella — if indeed she needs any encouragement — to pour her 
burning thoughts unclothed upon the page. 

Mrs. Atherton's second novel. " Hermia Suydam," which was sat 
upon by a jury of eight, while under consideration by Belford, Clarke 
A Co.. and pronounced the most immoral book in the English language, 
is to appear early this month. Mr. Fred Soniers, of the Current Lit- 
erature Publishing Company, will bringout the book, and was anxious 
to do so from the first. That it is an immoral story is a matter of 
personal opinion, but that its so-called immorality partaketh not of 
the fleshly and erotic school to which Mrs. Wilcox aspires to be the 
apostle and Anielie Rives the bead devil, is absolutely certain. 

This point was gratituitously conceded by the octave of critics who 
based their objections on its rampant radicalism, and declared it to 
be as revolutionary and dangerous in its influences, socially, as Rob- 
ert Elsmere proved to be from a religious point of view. The plot 
is certainly daring to a degree, unconventional, but quite " possible," 
which probably explains some scruples of the critical eight. " Her- 
mia Suydam " is a New York girl, born in poverty, but of excellent 
family,' plain to a point approaching positive ugliness, painfully con- 
scious of this unfortunate fact, and cursed, withal, with a fatal pas- 
sion for things beautiful. Condemned by her poverty and depend- 
ence to an existence, against whose narrow restrictions and paucity 
of color her whole nature is in protest, and this nature being an imag- 
inative, romantic and passionate one, -she gives herself up to a mor- 
bid sort of ideality, largely nourished by her eager and feverish peru- 
sal of books of the Ouidaesque school of literature, and by this pro- 
cess, long continued, becomes startlingly unconventional, not to say 
ungirlish, in her views of what life should be. A large fortune falls 
to her, unexpectedly, and she immediately resolves to realize every 
one of these ideals. The remainder of the book is devoted to an ac- 
count of her attempt to make in her own life a practical application 
of her somewhat appalling theories. As, among them, figures a fetich 
like adoration of Love in the abstract and an equally fierce contempt 
for the marriage relation as applied to it, some idea may be gathered 
as to what the critics meant by the revolutionary tendencies of this 
book. But the careful and evident application of the Spencerian the- 
ory of the inevitable, plays a strong part in the story. It is the doc- 
trine of cause and effect. The heroine is considered from childhood, 
and in every one of what may at first strike the reader as freaks can 



be traced the cause ol the theory that each act ol ■ life is bul the di- 
rect result of s preceding act, ami this seems to give some foun- 
dation for m> speculation that one fair Ban Francisco sutbon 

written her Incident over an undercurrent of Sp,-nc,-rian philosophy. 

Ballard Cbaio. 

" Hbllo, 1829! ' " Hello I" " Uoraghaa's, California Harketl Yes." 

■■ si\ quart* of oysters, fair and fresh, fur a party, p.d q." 

FURNITURE. CARPETS, UPHOLSTER!, 



FURNITURE DEPARTMENT, 

recently added to our business, 
contains nothing but N E W 
GOODS. 

CARPET DEPARTMENT 

is now daily receiving the new 
SPRING PATTERNS. 

UPHOLSTERY DEPARTMENT 
has just been replenished with 
LATE NOVELTIES. 

W. & J. SLOANE & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail, 

CARPETS ! FURNITURE ! UPHOLSTERY ! 
6 41-647 MA R KET STREET. 

THE LEAD EES OF FASHION ! 

FINE PARIS WRAPS, 

IMPORTED ULSTERS, 

ELEGANT TEA GOWNS, 
MODJESKAS, 

NEWMARKETS, 

JACKETS, JERSEY WAISTS, 
Chidren's Cloaks and Suits, Monkey Furs, etc. 



The Largest Stock, the Latest Styles, and the Best Pitting Cloaks and Suits 
offered on the Coast, and at the Lowest Possible Prices. 

FINE DRESSMAKING TO ORDER A SPECIALTY. 

Packages delivered free of charge in Oakland, Alameda and Berkeley. 
Telephone 803. 

FRATINGER'S, 

The Leading Cloak and Suit House, 



105 Kearny Street. 



[Nov. 21. 



Electric Improvement Co. 

ELECTRIC STREET RAILWAYS, 

AMERICAN SYSTEM OP ELECTRIC ARC LIGHTING, 

STANDARD UNDERGROUND CO.'S LEAD-COVERED CABLES, 

MATHER SYSTEM OP INCANDESCENT LIGHTING, 

ELECTRIC LIGHT WIRES, LAMPS, ETC. 

Estimates furnished for Electric Railways, Electric Light and Steam 
Plants. 

OFFICE, 217 SANSOME STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



JAS. DUFFY & CO, 

I35TTEBIOB DECOBATOBS. 

WALL PAPER— Endless Variety of Patterns, 
FIRST-CLASS WORK GUARANTEED. 



CARPETS, WINDOW SHADES, 

81 J Market Street, Flood Building, 



ETC. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 19, 1889. 




LL appearances indicate that the men consti- 
tuting the Legislature of the State, now in 
session at Sacramento, are mainly of the " put 
a nickel in the slot " kind, and while the circus 
lasts those engaged in drawing immigration 
to the State would perhaps do well in not directing the attention of 
land-seeking strangers to the affair. It is not a credit to the State, 
nor does it constitute a recommendation in the eyes of those who 
contemplate settling and becoming land owners and tax payers. 
Under the new Constitution and the far-reaching effect of general laws, 
against which the provisions of special municipal charters cannot 
stand, the Legislature has the power to do great harm, with an appar- 
ent present inclination to do the least possible amount of good. The 
Legislature is more than an offset to our glorious climate. Certainly 
no other reason than the session of the Legislature is apparent as a 
reason why the real estate market has suddenly began to sag. Ever 
since the one hundred and twenty " Honorabies " arrived at Sacra- 
mento the market has been more or less in the dumps, after having 
survived the holidays and brought into the new year an unprecedent- 
edly heavy business. But then as people get used to everything, 
even to a period of plague and pestilence, it is to be hoped that they 
will also become callous to the danger lurking at Sacramento, espec- 
ially since the firm of Marcus D. Waterman & Co. stands between 
the people and the Legislature. A good and active real estate market 
is confidently looked for, but there is no denying the fact that for the 
current week matters have slowed down somewhat. 

However, San Francisco's real-estate market has always been no- 
ticeable for its tits and starts. Months pass without a ripple of 
excitement, when some one arranges an auction sale of a piece of 
land which, heretofore, no one considered as choice in any respect. 
Then buyers appeared suddenly by the dozen, and there results a 
spasm of activity which extends to all neighboring lands, lasts for a 
couple of weeks and ceases. Dullness, more or less in degree, re- 
sumes its sway, and with it also higher prices. Such is practically 
the history in brief of our market during the last five years, which 
has witnessed a rise in prices, averaging fully fifty per cent., without 
any particular activity at any time. Nor is there any likelihood of a 
change so far as this feature is concerned. The laud in the outskirts 
is being gradually absorbed, and the march westward is steady, with- 
out seeming interruption. It now begins to look as if the ocean will 
be reached in about five years. 

The news of the week can be compressed into a small compass. 
The auction market is a fair indication of the manner in which the 
condition of things is interpreted by the leading offices, and of sales 
of this kind there are noticed but very few and comparatively unim- 
portant ones during tbe month of January. 

Among the principal events are the report that the Young Men's 
Christian Association has bonded the lot on the corner of Mason and 
Ellis street, recently sold for $1-15,000. The association intends to sell 
its Sutter-street property. Ellis street, and particularly the neigh- 
borhood of Mason, can stand a little more Christianity. Another 
report which has become current is to the effect that the Clay-street 
Savings Bank is the real purchaser of the Tucker building, at the 
southwest corner of Montgomery and Sutter streets, and that it in- 
tends to remove its banking office there. The institution will have 
to move if it intends to be remembered by the general public. The 
Hibernia Savings Bank, on the other hand, is already to the front 
with invitations to architects to submit plans for its new building at 
the corner of McAllister and Jones streets. It is said that the bank 
intends to put up a structure something*after the style of the Bank 
of California, the whole to be devoted to its own business, instead of 
putting up a general business block, which might produce rents. 

The week's record of sates does not contain much that is interest- 
ing. The most important transactions are 50x137:6 on the north 
side of Eddy, 137:6 feet wet of Taylor street; 40x57:6 on the west 
side of Dupont street, 20 feet north of Pine ; 31 :4xl37:6 on the north 
side of Ellis street, 210:7 feet west of Powell, $24,000; 45:10x137:6 on 
the east corner of Spear and Harrison streets, and 23:4x160 on the 
west side of Third street, 256:8 south of Bryant street. These com- 
prise all the leading transactions in the older parts of the city. In 
the residence portions tbe sales were not much more numerous. 
They include, in the Western Addition, 51:6x137:6 on the north side 
of Broadway, 103 feet west of Baker; 63:9x137:6 on the north side of 
Golden Gate avenue, 275 feet east of Masonic avenue ; 137 :6xl37 :6 on 
the south side of Vallejo street, 137:6 east of Buchanan street; 68:9x 
137:6 on the south side of Geary street, 137:6 feet east of Fillmore, 
$4,000; 31 :3x90 on the southeast corner of O'Farrell and Buchanan 
streets; 28:1x127:8 on the north side of Washington street, 246:10 
feet west of Broderick street; 137:6x412:6 on the southwest corner of 
Page and Pierce streets ; and in the Mission , 54x101 on the south side 
of Eighteenth street, 81:10 feet east of Fair Oak street, $2,800; 74x260 
on the north side of Seventeenth street. 222 feet east of Douglass; 
50x125 on the west side of Douglass street, 210 feet south of 24th 



street; 51:4x114 on the south side of 28th street, 203 feet east of 
Sanchez; 180x228 on the northeast corner of Twenty-second and 
Castro streets ; 51 :8xll4 on the south side of Twenty-third street, 125 
feet west of Diamond, and 325x100 on the east side of Hampshire 
street, 100 feet north of Twenty-fourth street, $9,100. 

The watar-front is about to undergo some changes at the foot of 
Market street. The work of constructing the sea-wall has now 
reached the ferry slips, and the structure is about to be carried fur- 
ther south. This will necessitate a rearrangement of the slips and 
offices, but it is thought that the ferry service will not be seriously 
interfered with pending the construction of the sea-wall. It is only 
to be regretted that, at the present time, neither the Harbor Com- 
mission nor the railroad people seem inclined to provide such a struc- 
ture and facilities as should be furnished in a city of San Francisco's 
position. 

Placer County has arranged a fruit and agricultural exhibit in the 
Starr-King Building, on Geary street, that is well worth seeing. En- 
terprise of this kind is bound to tell. 

The chances are favorable that Congress will appropriate $800,000 
for San Francisco's Post Office site. Simultaneously there seems to 
be arising an opinion that this building site will have to be sought for 
somewhere in the neighborhood of the new City Hall. 

If in gentleman's furnishings you would be neat, 

Just go to Carmany, Kearuy street, 

And you'll find that in goods he can't be beat. 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon.— This celebrated Whisky is for sale by all 
first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark— star within a shield. 



$1 A WEEK BUYS A HOME ! 

ELMORE COLONY TRACT. 

Five Acres for $75, payable SI per week. 
Ten Acres for $150, payable $2 per week. 
Twenty Acres for $300, payable $4- per week. 
Forty Acres for $600, payable $8 per week. 

Immediate possession given upon first payment; no interest and 
no taxes until paid for in full; title United States patent; no brush 
or undergrowth upon the land; in Tehama County, opposite the 
celebrated Stanford vineyard ; the cheapest land for the location in 
the State of California ; was assessed this year at a fraction over $10 
per acre. 

Persons wishing to see this land should go to Kirkwood, via Davis- 
ville, and apply to our branch office there, at KIEKWOOD, Tehama 
County, 

California Land Association, 

C. T. DENNIS, Manager, 
Or apply to this office. 

Only a little more will be sold at this price, when we propose to 
advance it to $20 per acre. 

1,000 farms for sale in all parts of the State, comprising orchards, 
vineyards, stock ranges, fruit farms, timber lands, unimproved lands, 
country homes at all kinds of prices, ranging from $100 to $100,000. 

For full information, maps, catalogues, etc., write or apply in 
person. 

THE CALIFORNIA LAND ASSOCIATION, 

634 MAEKET STREET, S. F., 
Jan. 19.1 Opposite Palace Hotel. 

CARRIAGES. 

We invite your attention to our recent ar- 
rivals of HIGH GRADE work, at reduced prices. 
BUSINESS BUGGIES A SPECIALTY. 

A. A. JACKSON & CO., 

33 Market Street, S. F. 

GEORGE GOODMAN, 

Patentee and Manufacturer of 

ARTIFICIAL STONE, 

IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 
Schillinger's Patent for Sidewalks and Garden Walks a Specialty. 
June 9.1 Office, 307 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block, S. F. 

To Architects ! 

The Directors of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society invite Architects 
to submit plans for their contemplated building at northwest corner of Mc- 
Allister and Jones streets. Particulars will be furnished by the secretary. 

San Francisco, January 12, 1889. FJ&n- 19. 



Jon. 19, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



10 



BIZ.' 



The Bullion product for 1888 Is tin- largest yet reported, amount- 
ing to }U4 in ,.vi.' iiii.l which i* some ten millions Bmitrr than in the 
year preceding. Montana heads the list with her JS2.000.000, Color- 
ado second with t- 1,750.000; California and Nevada a good third with 
their $12,000,000, respectively. o( the foregoing output: 130,000,000 
Qold, saj 20 per cent.; *">l 000,000 .silver, say IT per cent.; $18,000,000 
Copper, say 16 per cent.; fll.000,000 Lead, say 11 percent. 

Overland shipments Eastward for the month of December by the 
southern l'aeitie Company aggregated 26,112,500 pounds, and fur the 
year 1888, 166.412 200 pounds; tor December, 1887, l'I.TIs.uki pounds, 
and (or the year 1887, I1S.347.400 pounds ; for Peeember. isso. -jo.iiio.- 
000 pounds. 'and for the year l--;. 102,701.001.) pounds. San Francisco 
beaded the list as a shipper for Hecember, say 13,027.500 pounds, or 
mora than half of the whole. Leading items were as follows : Wine, 
8 713.350 lb-..; Wool, 2.375,566 lbs.; (.'aimed Goods, l,!)(i2,220 lbs.; 
Coffee, 256,680 lbs. ; Sugar, 334 ,010 lbs.; Quicksilver, 54.000 lbs. 

Qreenand Dried Fruits, Beans, Barley. Lumber, Shingles, Borax, 
Brandy, Canned Salmon, Leather, Hides, etc., were liberal in 
amount. 

Business in general is by no means active in any trade department. 
Even at the Produce Bxchange Call Hoard there is a great lack of en- 
thusiasm in dealing in futures, and what is lacking in actual business 
seems to be made up in light and trifling, and that is made the most of 
by some witticisms in the daily commercial press departments of sev- 
eral papers, and thus greatly lowering the dignity of their calling. An- 
other vessel, the 3rd, has left Calcutta for this port with Bags and 
Bagging Material, thus making ample provision for what now promises 
to be an immense grain crop upon the Pacific Coast. The price of 
Standard Calcutta drain Sacks for June-July delivery has of late been 
advanced to ~%c. The market for Quicksilver is poorly supplied ; 
price. $13 per flask; 000 flasks shipped direct East from the New Al- 
maden mines. 

The Pacific Mail Steamship San Bias, hence for the Isthmus, car- 
ried in transit for New York 3,189 ctls. Barley, 34,035 lbs. Borax, 
20.015 lbs. Copper, 97,500 lbs. Dried Fruit, 24.866 gals. Wine, etc.; 
value. $38,697. To Central America— 2,169 bbls. Flour, 30 M feet Lum- 
ber and Merchandise; value. $26,300. ToPanama— 1,119 bbls. Flour, 
10.034 lbs. Beans, 150.000 lbs. Rice, 6,462 lbs. Sugar and Merchandise ; 
value, $15,000. To Mexico— 297 bbls. Flour. 284 flasks Quicksilver, 
4.741 lbs. Tallow and Merchandise; value. $36,331. 

Flour to Londonderry, per Br. ship Eurydice, 19,613 bbls, value 
$85,350, shipped by Starr & Co. ; to China, per City of Peking, 7,211 
bbls., and to Japan. 307 bbls. The Zealandia, for Australia, 7,500 
bbls. ; value, $35,970. The previous steamer to the Colonies carried 
2.500 bbls. These are unusual shipments in that direction. From 
the Orient we have the steamship Arabic, bringing for cargo 35,372 
mats Rice, 1,205 pkgs. Tea, 305 bags Coffee, 225 bags Spices, 548 bales 
Jute. 1,651 rolls Matting and 6,500 pkgs. Chow-chow; also in transit 
for Eastern cities, to go overland. 368 pkgs Merchandise, 913 pkgs. 
Tea, 1,167 pkgs. Silk; for British Columbia, 2.000 mats Rice; for Cen- 
tral and South America. 3,450 mats Rice, etc. 

The steamer City of Peking, hence for the Orient on the 15th inst., 
carried in Treasure $559,565. Say to Hiogo— Silver Bars, $96,000; to 
Yokohama— Mexicans, $40,000; to Hongkong— $350,795 in Silver, $3,- 
710 in Gold. 

The combined receipts of Flour and Wheat reduced to grain for the 
cereal year, dating from July to January, thus compare with the 
year preceding: July 1, 1887, to January 15, 1888, 7,189,705 centals; 
July 1, 1888, to January 15, 1889, 10,813,570 centals, thus showing a 
large increase for the current season. The Wheat market is at pres- 
ent very sluggish for both spot and futures; the export requirement 
light. We quote Spot Wheat at $1.42X@$1.45. Flour is also in 
buyers' favor, say $4.50@$5 for Extras, and for Superfine $2.50@$3 
per bbl. 

The Dairy supply is very liberal for the season. Choice roll Table 
Butter, fancy, 25c. ; good, 22Kc.@24c. ; fair, 18c.@20c. Cheese, 12^c. 
@15c. Eggs, 28c.@30c. for store; ranch, 32c. Poultry from the East 
is in liberal supply, checking high prices. Apples and Oranges are in 
full supply, and prices of the lower grades very cheap. .Fancy 
Oranges rule high. Bananas and Limes are plentiful. 

There is considerable building activity going on in every part of the 
city. Upon Bush, Market and other business streets costly and sub- 
stantial fire-proof buildings are being erected that are both creditable 
and ornamental. There are comparatively very few good buildings 
to rent. Houses of seven to eleven rooms, modern style and finish, 
that rent from $60 to $75 per month in good localities, are in great re- 
quest, while houses in undesirable streets of six to seven rooms can 
be had for $25 per month, are not so easily rented as the former, and 
are more numerous. The want is for good modern-built houses with 
plenty of sun. This latter seems to be the all-important consider- 
ation. 

The freight market is for the moment rather slack for Grain ship- 
ments for Europe, but few British iron vessels were diseDgaged, and 
42s. 6d. U. K. the present nominal rate. 

The steamship Zealandia, for the Colonies with the Government 
mails and passengers, sailed on the 15th inst., via Honolulu, she hav- 
ing been detained here three days waiting the arrival of the English 
mail; also merchandise of the value of $114,521, consisting in part of 



7,500 bbls. Flour. 1 ,045 oa. Canned Is, 2,081 cs. Sain 22.300 lbs. 

Oodflsb; 14.010 lbs. Dried i'mii. she mI-o carried to New Zealand 
Salmon. 1,821 lbs. Bops. etc. 1 1, r Honolulu cargo 
consisted of Codfish, B icon, Hams and other produce. 

The steamer City ot Peking's cargo t'o- China and Hongkong, was 
rained at $53,168, and consisted In part of 7,211 bbls. Flour. 1,166 li>*. 
Ginseng, 100 cases Canned Goods, 1,100 lbs. Bacon and Ham, 
lbs. Cheese, etc. To Japan, Merchandise, value, $16,216, say SO] bbls. 
Flour, 129 pkgs. Leather, 21.171 lbs. Sugar, 7,168 lbs. Butter, etc, To 
Manila. 2,487 lbs. Hams. To Penang, lOOcases Salmon, ToSama- 
rang. 5u cases Canned Goods. To Bourabaya, 60 cases Salmon and 20 

rases l ':tnnt'il I foods. 

White, tiik hattkk, is jnst the boss 
To L'ivr you a imt iii shiniest gloss, 
Or Derby or felt, whichever y<>u need. 
You'll tluil that Wliilo is right In the lead. 
630 Commercial street. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, 

Nos. 309 and 311 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California, 
Sole Agents Purimaohos Fire-proof Cement, "indestruct- 
ible and infallible." 
Sole Agents for " Bull Dog " brand of Bass' Ale and Guinness' 
STOUT--Bottled by Robert Porter & Co. 

Sole_Agents Johnson's Elephant brand English Portland 

Cement, 
general agents-national assurance co. of ireland ; 

atla3 assurance co. op london ; 

boylston insurance co. of boston. 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE, 1887. 
THE GOLD MEDAL AWARDED TO THE 

NATIONAL BREWING CO., 

Was given not for export or fancy display, but for the best 

Lager Beer Brewed on this Coast. 



FIRST PRIZE AGAIN MECHANICS' FAIR, 1888. 



[Dec. 16 



PARKE & LACY, 

21 and 23 FREMONT STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MINING, WOOD AND IEON WORKING MACHINERY. 

[rjNGINES, BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS, 
BELTING, OILS AND SUPPLIES. 

A. LUSK & CO., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
Packers of the following celebrated brands: 
A.. LUSK BEAR BRAND, 

J. LUSK CANNING COMPANY, 

SAN LORENZO "ACKINO CO. 



H. B Williams. 



W. H. DIHOND 



A. Chesebrodgh. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & GO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

UNION BUILDING, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS, 

Agents for Pacific Mail Steamship Company, Pacific Steam Navigation Com- 
pany, The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship Company, "The Californ:a Line of 
Clippers," from New York and Boston, and "The Hawaiian Line." 

J. D. Spreckels & Bros., 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Agents for Spreckels' Line of Hawaiian Packets, S. 8. Hepworth's Ceutri 
fugal Machines, Reed's Patent Pipe and Boiler Covering. 
327 Market Street, corner Fremont, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

CUNNINGHAM CURTISS, & WELCH, 

WHOLESALE STATIONERS AND BOOKSELLERS, 

327, 329, 331 SANSOME STREET. 

ITeh, 19. 1 

S. h. Jones. E. D. Jones. 

S. L. JONES & CO., 

Auctioneers and Commission Merchants, 
207 and 209 California Street. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 19, 1889. 



THE WOR LD, FLESH AND DEVIL 

BOSTON men. tbat is, a few of them, writes Rene Bache, have 
discovered recently a capital solution of the between-the-acts 
problem. It is not agreeable for a gent — the term is used ad- 
visedly — to make a dozen people get upon their feet and fold 
up their seats to let him pass three or four times during the 
play. It is not pleasant, as any one who had tried it will admit, to 
squeeze pasta row of reluctant women and ill-natured men, who stick 
out their feet so that you cannot help treading upon them, and 
grumble if you so much as happen to step on one of their hats. To 
do this twice for each drink procured is almost too much trouble, 
and thus it is that a new invention, not yet patented by a local 
apothecary, appears likely to acquire popularity. It is simply a 
gelatine capsule, like those used for nauseous medicines, but larger 
and filled with the finest old bourbon. One dozen of them tit neatly 
into a small box, of a convenient size for the pocket, and half that 
number is guaranteed to induce just that mellow condition of incip- 
ient intoxication which accentuates so accutely a gent's enjoyment 
of a stage performance, particularly if there is an incidental ballet 
divertissement. The capsules, upon being placed in the mouth, dis- 
solve immediately, the dose contained in each being so nicely calcu- 
lated as to bring a comfortable condition of inebriety during an en- 
tire evening within easy reach of the sedentary tippler. 

Mrs. August Belmont, says the Philadelphia Times, has the finest 
collection of sapphires in this country, though Mrs. William Astor 
is credited with possessing the finest single one. When one of the 
younger Astors was married, a dainty present was given her by her 
uncle. It was her wedding slippers. They were of white satin, 
elaborately seeded with pearls, put in a white satin box, on the inside 
of which, in pale colors, were "lady slippers," and on the outside 
china asters. The sentiment was really very pretty, and the work 
was most artistically done. 

The new Japanese Minister, Mr. Mutsu, has one of the most beau- 
tiful homes and interesting households in Washington, writes a cor- 
respondent. His wife is a bright and refined woman, but a little 
timid because she does not speak English. He is a scholarly man, 
and well informed concerning the affairs of the United States and 
politics of Europe, as well as topics connected with his own country. 
He talks English but little, but is improving rapidly by experience. 
They have three children— two sons, and a daughter fourteen years 
old, who is now at school in that city, and has for a companion Miss 
Kuki, the daughter of the former Minister. It is a custom in Japan 
for rich men who have no children of their own to adopt them, and 
Mr. Fura Kawa, a gentleman of enormous wealth, has adopted Mr. 
Mutsu's eldest son, a j'oung man eighteen years old, who has taken 
the name of his adopted father, although he is living at present with 
his natural father, the Minister, and studying law at Columbia Col- 
lege, Washington. Mr. Sato, the Secretary of Legation, was edu- 
cated at Greencastle, Ind., and speaks English fluently. 

A circular, very private and particular, says the New York Times, 
has been very quietly circulated among the fifty sponsors of the Mc- 
Allister balls— that is, the Patriarchs and several other bodies, essen- 
tially of the same composition, who dance, eat and drink so famously 
at Delmonico's. The plan is to buy the Lorillard house at $300,000, 
alter and refurnish it at a cost of another $100,000, and then form a 
company of 400 shareholders at $1,000 apiece. No name is suggested, 
but we should think that McAllister's Academy would be suitable. 
The premises would be positively sacred to the Four Hundred, for no 
other entertainments than theirs would be given therein, and thus 
they would be still further distinguished from common people than 
they are already. ^ 

The carriage horses of Queen Victoria are destitute of tails, or 
rather, are gifted with only a few scrubby, mangy-looking wisps of 
hair in the place where the tails ought to be. Some well-known 
Americans, paying a visit to the royal stables, expressed great sur- 
prise at the paucity of the caudal appendage bestowed, by nature, 
upon Her Majesty's steeds, but was assured by the head groom that 
" they looked h'all right h'in 'arness," therewith producing two pairs 
of long, luxuriant, artificial tails, which are cunningly adjusted to fit 
the necessity, and which go on daily as an important feature of the 
" 'arness." 

Mrs. James G. Blaine, Jr., has her photographs on exhibition in 
Sarony's big Broadway window. She is an exceedingly handsome 
girl, with very blue eyes and a quantity of richly tinted blonde hair. 
Her figure is handsome, too, cast in the Junoesque mold, and her 
features are strong and regular. She grows younger with every fresh 
newspaper paragraph. We have now got her down to nineteen, and, 
as she can scarcely appear under the title of infant phenomenon, her 
enterprising manager has only a year or so left to knock off her age. 



A writer in the Philadelphia Times says: Without being unkind to 
women, I want to say that very few of them know how to wash their 
faces, not only so they will be clean, but so the skin will remain 
white, firm and tight— this tightness preventing wrinkles. Here is 



the recipe: Fill a large bowl full of hot water — I mean hot. not 
tepid; then bathe your face thoroughly, using for this purpose your 
hands, which have been called by a scientist a wash-rag with a brain 
in it. Don't just give your face a dab or two, but let it know what a 
bath means; then, while it is still feeling the effect of the hot water, 
give it another bath in cold water; then dry it with a soft towel. Do 
not believe for an instant that rough towels are good for a fine skin; 
you might just as well use a currycomb to keep your bang in order. 



The violin gown, says an Exchange, is one of the tea gown's latest 
rivals. So many young women have set themselves to practicing 
with the bow that the violin gown is the attire in which these musical 
aspirants are most likely to be found of an afternoon. The violin 
gown most often is of a creamy primrose color, the tint which con- 
trasts most splendidly with the dark red of the polished wood, a pale 
yellow silk skirt, held by a sash of crepe, with fringed ends, tied to 
hang low in front, a round waist, with lace sleeves in soft puffs about 
the arms and coming only to the elbows, forms the basis of the violin 
gown last seen. Clusters of deep red artificial roses, delicately per- 
fumed, were fastened in the draperies, and a large opal glowed from 
a bracelet on the wrist. The opal is the jewel most frequently worn 
with the violin gown. When the violin is under the chin, and the 
bow is held high and the first staccato notes begin, then the opal is in 
its glory. 



The ladies of Birmingham have subscribed for two splendid pres- 
ents for Mrs. Chamberlain, says the New York World. One is a very 
rich necklace of seventy-three selected pearls strung on fine silk with 
a single diamond clasp. It cost $2,000. Another gift is a diamond 
six-pointed star composed of fifty-five stones of the finest water. 
These are set in silver, with a gold mount, and form either a brooch 
or a hairpin. The center diamond weighs one and a quarter carats, 
and between the rays of the star are shorter projections, each bear- 
ing a smaller brilliant. For wearing it as a pendant it is provided 
with an ordinary broochpin, but for use as an ornament in the hair 
there is a pin with a spiral spring attached, so as to cause the diamond 
to sparkle brilliantly with each movement of the head. The star is 
contained in a case of chocolate-colored velvet and has the monogram 
M. E. C. in saw-pierced silver. 

An important field by J. M. Litchfield 
Is filled to perfection. If you ask, "Which field?" 
Just wend your way to 12 Post street, 
And try a suit of their garments neat, 
Where gentlemen always the best will meet. 



A cable dispatch to the World says the Queen of Wurtemburg has 
joined the King at the Hotel Splendide. There have been further 
rows in the royal household over Messrs. Woodcock and Hendry, 
the King's American favorites, who were dismissed about six weeks 
ago on the demand of the Stuttgardt Cabinet. They have, however, 
remained in the neighborhood, fully expecting to be recalled, and the 
King has been most anxious for them to return. The (J,ueen, how- 
ever, is a very strong-headed woman, with all the imperious qualities 
of the imperial house of Russia, to which she belongs, and after 
consulting with the Ministers she has put her foot down and decided 
against the King's proposal. It is asserted that were the Americans 
to return she would immediately leave the King. But he has to be 
treated with particular consideration on account of the precarious 
state of his health. His life at the Hotel Splendide is, however, on a 
much more inexpensive scale than on the occasion of his former 
visits to the Riviera. 

Mr. Parnell, according to a London letter, is not an easy man to 
interview. He is utterly free, both in private and public, from the 
effusiveness that longs to overflow into confidence. He is far from 
an ungenial man; indeed, having often traveled with him under all 
kinds of circumstances — and travel is a great test of man's amiability 
— I can say truly that 1 never found a fellow-traveler more agreeable 
and more unselfish. He carries into the smallest details of his life a 
high-bred courtesy, which is a far higher proof of his good birth and 
breeding than his descent from so many of the statesmen of Ireland 
and his relationship to many of the best families in England. But he 
is distinctly not an effusive man, and of all subjects that of which he 
least likes to speak is himself. It is doubtful if be ever spent a mo- 
ment of his whole life in self-analysis, and if he ever did so he has 
certainly never communicated the result to anybody. 

George Vanderbilt, the millionaire son of the late William H. 
Vanderbilt, has purchased a tract of about 3,000 acres of valuable 
land near Ashville, N. C, says the New York Herald. The young 
Crcesus, whose modest shrinking from publicity is well known, is not I 
quite ready to take the world into his confidence as to the use he in- . 
tends to make of this most extensive tract. There appear to be I 
reasons for believing, however, that Mr. Vanderbilt will eventually \ 
astonish the public by developing as a philanthropist on a grand 
scale. It is said— and it is not contradicted by Mr. Vanderbilt— that 
his object is nothing less than the establishment of a college for 
women. The large scale on which the work has begun— the acquir- 
ing of 3.000 acres of the finest land in the Southern country— show 
that if this is Mr. Vanderbilt's intention, the institution will be of 
noble and splendid proportions and of wide and generous scope. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTER. 



Jan, 19, 1889, 

"MAN OR DEMON." 
'T* T i* nearly forty year* since all Paris was Hocking to see Frederic 
i Lamaitre In a certain gri&ly melodttma bearing the above tide. 
c) Tho story ol tin- play was simple; the plot turned upon one 
__ ghastly pivot— demoniac possession. A physician, a man of 
icteuoe and enlightenment, reOned, Intellectual, of blameless 
life ami gracious bearing;, beloved and respected by the world he 
adorned, was possessed by devils. Ln the broad light of day, to the 
exercise of his profession, In society, be ww his own man, all went 
well frith him ; bnl with night and solltade the demon came and took 
possession of his victim, and impelled him to deeds of blood. 

Through the darkened theatre there thrilled a silent horror that 
held the crowded audience spell-bound, as the man of science flung 
a handful of DOWder into his crucible, and. in the lurid light that rose 
around blm was seen the awful change from man to monster. The 
tall, slim figure of the physician, graceful and elegant in his neat 
evening dress, swelled to gigantic dimensions, brawny, muscular, the 
form of a savage Hercules, while the fashionable modern dress 
changed to the blue blouse and blood-red cap of the sansculotte. The 
Face changed, too; the pale, refined features thickened, the brows 
grow penthouse-like above the lurid gleam of the malignant eyes; 
while, with a cry that had nothing in it of humanity, the transform- 
ed creature rushed forth to revel in rapine and murder. 

i>ne fact gave an additional and extraneous interest to the per- 
formance. Those who knew the celebrities of the city were able to 
recognize the curious and startling likeness which Lemaitre, in his 
make-up as the physician, bad contrived to present to one of the 
princes of modern science. Marc Avalon, the celebrated chemist — a 
man who. at something less than forty years of age, had reached the 
very pinnacle of professional success, who had given laws to science, 
and had made discoveries which had advanced the progress of chemi- 
cal experiment further in his twenty years of labor than his prede- 
cessors had done within a century, iSo striking was the resemblance 
as to be at once perceived and remarked upon, both at the first per- 
formance of the play and in the public press. It was even thought 
that Marc Avalon would take offense at this appropriation of his out- 
ward semblance, and possibly make it the subject of a lawsuit; but 
the great chemist seemed amused, and even flattered, when he read 
the comments of the critics upon this particular feature of Lemaitre's 
characterization. He went to see the play— was interested: went 
again— saw Lemailre in his dressing-room, and made several sugges- 
tions which intensified the grim realism of the scene in the laboratory. 
It was observed by and by that Avalon was present nearly every 
night during some period of the performance. He generally occupied 
one particular avant-scene, and kept himself perdu, but those few per- 
sons who were able to sec his face, as he sat in the shadow of the curtain , 
remarked upon its intent expression and the keen delight he seemed to 
derive from the actor's masterly embodiment of an unreal character. 

It was during the run of this play that Paris was startled by a series 
of murders more hideous than any crime that had shocked society 
during the reign of the Citizen-King; murders which bore a horrible 
resemblance in being to all appearances motiveless, and the work of 
a monster, whose sole desire was to steep himself in the blood of an 
unoffending victim. 

Paris and the police of Paris were on the alert, looking for the 
Chourineur. It was by that grim name the murderer was talked of 
in those circles where slang is the only language. Cauler, the chief of 
the secret guardians of the public safety, had worked till he was 
weary; weary of his own false lights and failures; wearier of other 
people's futile and sometimes idiotic suggestions. He was sitting in 
the April twilight before a cafe on the Boulevard des Italiens, not 
many doors from the Ambigu Theatre, sitting alone at one of the lit- 
tle marble tables, taking his demitasse after a temperate dinner, and 
listening idly to the conversations around and about him. He was oft 
duty, restingajaded brain, yet the old habit of listening and putting 
two and two together at all times and in all places was so strong upon 
him that his ear was on the alert unconsciously, and his brain soon 
awakened to interest in the talk of two men at a table near his own. 
They were of the flaneur species both, one young, one middle-aged 
men who knew their Paris, evidently. " Here he comes," said the el- 
der man, looking down the boulevard toward the Grand Opera. " I 
felt sure he would pass us before 8 o'clock; he is there every night." 
" Not every night, surely? " said the other. " I have seen the piece 
at least half a dozen times, and he was in the theatre every time. Men 
have told me the same thing. It is a kind of mania — a diseased van- 
ity — I suppose. He likes to see himself on the stage— the central fig- 
ure, the cynosure of every eye." 

The man they spoke of approached and passed toward the theatre. 
Tall, slim , well-dressed .with alight overcoat over his evening suit, pale, 
with a fixed look about the eves, a curious mobility about the mouth. 
" He looks harassed and ill," said the young man. 
"Overwork, brain pressure," said the elder. " 1 should not be sur- 
prised if I were to hear within the next few months that Marc Ava- 
lon had gone off his head." 

Cauler rose and followed the great chemist into the theatre, follow- 
ed him to the door of his avant scene, and then went round the other 
side of the house, and got a stall from which he could observe the face 
in the shadow of the curtain as well as the lowered lights would allow. 
The idea of this prince of science being on the verge of lunacy had 
started a curious train of thought in the brain of the skilled detective. 
He hung about the vestibule till he saw Marc Avalon leave the the- 



21 



atre, and was able to keep linn in sight without appearing to follow 

him. An elderly man, who looked like S doctor, aCCOSted the sa- ' 
vant as he went out. and tile two men walked along. They went into 
the cafe, came out in .i quarter "f an hour, when Avalon bailed 

The detective followed him in another. The tly deposited him at 
his own house in the Kue St. Guillaume. Cauler drove to the end ..I 
the street, dismissed his oab and went back to Marc Avalon 'a dour- 
way on foot. The lions,- in which the chemist lived was a fine old 
mansion in a quadrangular court, dull, dignified, respectable. It was 
a moonless night, and the courtyard was black as Erebus at this hour, 
save for one lamp which burned dimly over the porte-cochere. There 
was plenty of cover for the detective. 

He saw the light of a lamp travel slowly through two rooms upon 
the second floor and finally settle in a third room. 

The external Venetian shutters were closed, but there was no cur- 
tain drawn within, and the lamplight shone betwixt the wooden bars. 
M. Cauler took up his position in the embrasure of a doorway lead- 
ing to the offices, an obscure doorway in a corner of the great, grave 
house, as if he meant to stay there half the night. A curious waste 
of power, one might suppose, this night-watch in the Rue St. Guil- 
laume, but of late Cauler had been wasting much power in hunting 
will-o'-the-wisps across the morass of Paris, and one ignus futuus is 
as good as another. To-night it was Cauler's whim to watch the 
windows of Marc Avalon. 

The lamplight continued undisturbed for an hour and a half. The 
third quarter after one tolled heavily from the tower of Notre Dame 
yonder, and other church chimes repeated the solemn measure. .Sud- 
denly those windows on the second floor grew dark. This time the 
light did not travel from room to room ; it was extinguished on the spot. 
" The man of science has gone to bed," said Cauler, with a touch of 
disappointment. " 1 may go home and get my supper." He waited 
some minutes notwithstanding, and, looking up, presently he gave a 
cry of triumphant surprise. " Dieu de Dieu ! I have bit it this time," 
he muttered. 

There was a light shining through the shutters of those three upper 
windows— a light more vivid than the shine of the domestic lamp, a 
fiery crimson glow, such as he had seen in the theatre three hours 
ago, in the famous laboratory scene. It lasted three or four minutes, 
and then came darkness again. This time Cauler had no idea of going 
home to supper. He waited for the expected opening of door or window. 
It came presently ; a window on the ground floor was cautiously 
lifted and a man stepped out into the courtyard— a man wearing a 
blue blouse and a red cap, a ruffianly-looking brute, with big, pro- 
jecting teeth, like the fangs of a wild beast, and long, coarse black 
hair, like the hair of a wild beast. 

This brutal figure crept stealthily across the yard and out of the 
porte cochere, Cauler following more stealthily ; for the walk of the 
blouse there was the overacted caution of the novice, in the walk of 
the detective there was the subtlety of the man accustomed to hunt 
his fellow men. 

He followed that creeping figure, slouching across the road, doub- 
ling, winding, his hand clutching something in his breast. Cauler 
followed him from the Rue St. Guillaume to the Quai des Grands 
Augustins, across one of the bridges to the Cite, from the Cite by 
another bridge to the region of the markets; never lost sight of him, 
yet on the way contrived to call in at a station of night police and to 
enlist a couple of policemen in the chase. The three contrived to 
keep Blue-blouse in sight, wind and double as he might; watched 
him as he accosted a night wanderer in a dark alley, and saw her fly 
from him, scared at that grim face and panther teeth under the red 
cap. They followed him through the intricacies of a labyrinth of 
squalid streets which has long disappeared, saw him stop to speak to 
a woman, more wretched than perhaps she who had fled from him 
half an hour before— saw him bend to speak to her as if in friendli- 
ness, then with a sudden clutch fasten one livid hand upon her throat, 
while the other hand was thrust into his breast. 

Quick as they were to spring upon him, they were not an instant 
too soon. Another second and that long knife would have done its 
deadly work, as it had done thrice before in the streets of Paris. The 
Chourineur, the murderer of the Rue Ste. Marguerite, the Rue de la 
Lanterne, and the Rue des Feves, was found. Yes, this was the so- 
lution of the mystery. Homicidal mania, the fatal outcome of a brain 
wrecked by overwork, day labor and night labor— the too ardent 
thirst for knowledge, the too keen ambition to achieve. It had need- 
ed but a spark to fire the brain, and the spark had been found in the 
suggestion of the drama at the Ambigu. Marc Avalon had watched 
and brooded over the play till it bad become a reality to him, and he 
had yielded to the irresistible impulse that drove him to act out the 
idea in hts own person. 

He died before the end of a year in a state lunatic asylum. In 
searching his laboratory the police found more than one set of fangs, 
carved in ivory which the chemist had laboriously fashioned in imi- 
tation of the actor's hideous make up. It was discovered, too, that 
he had carried his experiments with the magnesium lights, then lit- 
tle known, far beyond the mechanism of the theatre; but confessions 
made by him later to the doctors of the asylum revealed that he had 
firmly believed in his possession of occult knowledge by which he 
was able to assume diabolical attributes and diabolical power. — Ex. 

Ed. Note: The reader will at once notice the family resemblance between 
this Parisian melodrama of forty years ago and the IJr. Jekyllaud Mr. Hyde 
of to-day. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 19, 1889. 



LLOYD TEV1S President. San Francisco, 
JNO. i VALENTINE. Vice- PRESIDENT 

anb Gen Manager San Francisco. 
JAMES HERON Secretary San Francisco. 
H. B. PARSONS. Asst. Sucr New Tore. 
H. WADSWORTH, Treasurer, San Francisco. 

office of the 
Vice-Pres't and Gen'l Manager. 



elk, Jarflo & 4 om P mt 8> 

3cm eF-tci-ucioco, 'Dccc-wtGet- 31, 1888. 

Dear Sir: The following is a copy of our Annual Statement of precious Metals produced in the States and 
Territories west of the Missouri River (including British Columbia, and receipts by express from the West Coast States 
of Mexico) during 1888, which shows aggregate products as follows : Gold, $30,468,052; Silver, $54,348,420; Copper 
$18,261,490 ; Lead, $11,263,630. Total gross result, $114,341,592. 

As stated repeatedly, the facilities afforded for the transportation of bullion, ores, and base metals, by the 
extension of railroads into mining districts, increase the difficulty of verifying the reports of the products from several 
important localities ; especialty is this the case in the reports from Colorado and Montana. And the general tendency is 
to exaggeration when the actual values are not obtainable from authentic sources ; but the aggregate result as shown 
herein, we think may be relied on with reasonable confidence as approximately correct. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES. 


Gold Dust and Bul- 
lion by Express. 


Gold Dust and Bul- 
lion by other 
Conveyances. 


Silver Bullion 
by Express. 


Ores and Base 
Bullion by Freight 


TOTAL 




$9,160,083 

2,876,275 

601,566 

94,112 


$916,008 


$ 652,652 
6,858,520 


$1,334,725 
2,570,808 


$12,063.46? 
12,305,603 




100,000 

30,000 

820,000 


701,566 








124,112 








820,000 




2,635,000 
5,100,000 

277,720 
3,100,000 

193.598 

712,600 

2,390,716 

950 

479,400 


3,700,000 

11,500,000 

3.479.138 

17,725,100 

183,641 

850,798 

453,216 

1,195.673 


2,350,0 
15,776,000 
3,800,383 
5,930,400 
2,782,040 
3,460,470 


8,685,000 






32,376,000 


Utah 




7.557. Z 4I 






26,755,500 




50,000 
100,000 
100,000 


3,209,279 




5,123,868 




2,943.93 2 






1,196,623 








479.400 












Total 


$27,622,020 


$2,Il6,008 


$46,598,738 


$38,004,826 


$114,341,592 







The gross yield for 1888, shown above, segregated, is approximately as follows: 



Gold . . . 
Silver.. 
Copper . 
Lead . . . 



.26A 5 o- $30,468,052 

•47i¥(f 54,348,420 

•I5t¥o- 18,261,490 

. 9tuV 11,263,630 



Total $114,341,592 

ANNUAL PRODUCTS OF LEAD, COPPER, SILVER AND GOLD IN THE STATES AND TERRITORIES WEST OF THE MISSOURI RIVER, 1870-1888. 



YEAR. 


Production as 
per W. F. & Co's State- 
ments, including 
amounts from British 
Columbia and West 
Coast of Mexico. 


Product after 
deducting Amounts 

from British 

Columbia aud West 

Coast of Mexico. 


The Net Products of the States and Territories west of the Missouri River, exclusive of 
British Columbia and West Coast of Mexico, divided, is as follows: 


Lead. 


Copper. 


SILVER. 


Gold. 


1S7O 
1S7I 

I«72 

1873 

1874 

1875 

1876 


$54,000,000 
58,284.000 
62,236,959 
72,258,693 
74,401,045 
80,889,057 
90,875,173 
98,421,754 
81,154,622 
75,349,501 
80,167,936 
84,504,417 
92,411,835 
90,313.612 
S 4,975,954 
90,181,260 
103,011,761 
104,645,959 
114,341.592 


$52,150,000 
55,784,000 
60,351,824 
70,139,860 
71,965,610 
76,703,433 

87.219,859 
95,81 1, 5S2 
78,276 167 
72,6S8,888 
77,232,512 
81,198,474 
89.207,549 
84,639,212 

81,633.835 

87,311,382 

100,160,222 

103.327.77° 
112,665,569 


$1,080,000 
2,100,000 
2,250,000 
3,450,000 
3,8oo,O0O 
5,100,000 
5,040,000 
5,085,250 
3,452,000 
4.185.769 
5.742.390 
6,361,902 
8,008,155 
8,163,550 
6,834,091 
8,562.991 
9,185.192 

9.63L073 
11,263,630 




$17,320,000 

19,286,000 

19,924,429 
27,483,302 

29,699,122 

31.635,239 
39,292,924 
45,846,109 
37,248,137 
37,032,857 
38,033.055 
42,987,613 

48,133,039 
42,975,101 

43,529,925 
44,516,599 
52,136,851 

5 o,S33,884 
53,152,747 


$33,750,000 




34,398,000 




38,177.395 




39,206,558 




3S, 466,48s 




39,968,194 




42,8S6,935 


1877 

1S78 

1879 

I880 
iSSl 
ISS2 
18S3 

r884 
18S5 
1SS6 
1SS7 
iSSS 




44,880,223 




37.576.030 




31,470,262 


$ SgS.ooo 
I,I95,O0O 

4.055.037 
5.683,921 
6,086,252 
7.83S.036 

9.276.755 
10,362,746 
18,261,490 


32,559.067 

30,653,959 
29,011,318 
27,816,640 
25,183,567 
26,393,756 
29,561,424 
32,500,067 
29,987,702 



The exports of Silver during the past year to Japan, China, the Straits, etc., have been as follows: 
London, $25,793,207; from Marseilles, $r,i2S,6SS; from Venice, $ ; from San Francisco, $14,621,431 

Total. $41,543,326, as against $43,oo6,6iS last year. Pounds Sterling estimated at $4.84. 



From 



Jan. 18, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



rllvii'teb Stotao of SReootco. 



STATEMENT OF THE PRODUCT OF GOLD AMI SILVER IN THE REPUBLIC OF MEXICO, REVISED AND CORRECTED FROM 1877 TO l8S8. 



YEARS. 


Gold. 


Silvlk. 


Total. 


1878 1S79 


$747,000 

88l,OQO 

942,000 
1,013,000 

937,000 

956,000 
1,055,000 

914,000 
1,026,000 
1,047,000 
1,031,000 


$24,837,000 
25,125,000 
26,800,000 
29,234,000 
29.329.000 
29,569.000 

31,695,000 
33,226,000 
34,112,000 
34.600.000 
34,912,000 


l25.5S4.OOO 
26,006,000 
27,742,000 
30,247,000 
30. 266.OOO 
30,525,000 
32,750,000 
34,140,000 
35,138,000 
35.6.17,000 
35.943.000 






1881 

1881 -1SS2 

1881-1883 

884 


i88s 


1S85-1S86 


[886-1887 

18-17-1888 




Total 


$10,549,000 


$333.439.°°o 


$543,988,000 





EXHIBIT OF COINAGE OF GOLD, SILVER AND COPPER, IN THE REPUBLIC OF MEXICO, F.iOM THE 1ST OF JULY, 1873, 

TO THE 30TH OF JUNE, 188S. 



YEARS. 


Gold Dollars. 


Silver Dollars. 


Copper Dollars. 




866,743 
862,619 
809,401 
695.750 
691,998 
658,206 
521,826 
492,068 

452.59° 
407,600 
328,698 
423,250 
425,000 
410,000 
340,320 


iS,S46,o67 
19.386,958 
19.454,054 
21,415,12s 
22.0S4.203 
22,162,987 
24,018,528 
24.617,395 
25,146,260 
24,083,921 

25,377,379 
25,840,72s 
25,850,000 
25,600,000 
26,711,000 


15966 


IN74-IS75 


187S-1S76 


30,654 

9,035 

4L364 


1876-1877 

1877-187S 


187S-1S79 


1S79-18S0 

1SS0-1SS1 


14,035 
42,258 


1S81-1S82 

1882-1S83 


11,972 


1SS4-1S85 




1SS5-1SS6 .• 




1SS6-1S87. 




1887-1888 








Total 


|8,3S6,o69 


fo50,594,6oS 


$203,296 







Summary.— Totals : Gold, £8,386,069; Silver, $350,594,608; Copper, $203,296 ; Grand Total, $359,183,973- 



EXHIBIT OF THE COINAGE OF MEXICO FROM THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE MINTS IN 1537, TO THE END OF THE FISCAL YEAR OF ] 



Colonial Epoch. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Copper. 


TOTAL. 




$ S.497.950 
19,889,014 
40,391,447 


$ 752,067,456 
441,629.211 
888,563.989 


$200,000 


$ 760,765,406 




461,518,225 




342,893 


929,298,329 






Independence. 


$68,778,411 


$2,082,260,656 


$542,893 


$2,151,581,960 




$ 557.392 
45,040,62s 


$ lS,575.569 
740,246,485 




$ 19,132,961 
790,522,290 




$5,235,177 


Republic. 


$45,598,020 


$758,822,054 


$5,235,177 


$809,655,251 


Eagle coin, from 1st July, 1S73, to 30th of 
June, 1S88 


$S,386,o69 


|3So.594.6o8 


$203,296 


$359,183,973 







SUMMARY. 

Colonial Epoch— from 1537 to 1S21, $2,151,581,960; Independence— from 1S22 to 1S73, $809,655,251 ; Republic— from 
1873 to 1SS8, $359,183,973. Total, $3,320,421,184. 

The exhibits of production and mintage indicate a steady development of the mining interests of the United States 
of America, and also of Mexico; and, with the increasing facilities of railway communication fostering every department ol 
industry, the outlook for a continued growth in the product of precious metals is flattering. 

JOHN J. VALENTINE. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 19, 1889. 



8 



PERSONALITIES. 

" " AY GOULD never answers a begging letter. He receives them 
at the rate of a dozen a day, and some very singular specimens 
of the art. A recent appeal was from a young girl, living a 
little distance from New York city, which stated, in pathetic 
terms, that " Papa" had lost a great deal of money and was 
unable to give her a pony cart promised for a New Year's gift, and 
" wouldn't Mr. Gould please send her the money. A cart could not 
possibly cost over $150, and she was sure he never would miss that 
amount." It is unnecessary to say that Mr. Gould made no excep- 
tion to his rule in the case of this modest young woman. 

Mr. Gladstone asserts that if the first line of any passage from 
Homer be given him, he can quote the entire page. 

The Duchess d' Uzes, who is reported engaged to be married to the 
General, Boulanger (pending the divorce), is a sculptor of some, 
talent. She signs " Manuela " to all her artistic efforts, this being 
the name of a young man with whom she had a love affair in her 
early youth. So far she has been, in other respects, faithful to this 
memory, but constancy hath her limits, and "Manuela" has gone 
down before the sword of Boulanger. 

Miss Letitia Aldrich, a neice of Senator William Stewart, has ex- 
changed a social career at Washington for a professional life on the 
boards, and has joined Palmer's Jim the Penman company in their 
Western tour. Miss Aldrich is a dark-eyed, clever-looking girl, with 
any amount of pluck and perseverance behind her dramatic talent, 
and strongly resembles Miss Bessie Hooker, whose handsome face is 
well known in San Francisco, and who is now conceded to be one of 
the beauties of the American colonv in Paris. 



One of the best-dressed women in Europe is Maria Pia, Queen of 
Portugal, as she is also the possessor of some of the most beautiful 
jewels, her parures of rubies and diamonds being famous. Although 
her manner is somewhat reserved and cold as compared with that of 
the King, who is most sincerely loved by his subjects, she has earned 
for herself the popular title of "Angel of Pity," on account of the 
prominent part she takes in the principal charities in the country. 
The working of some of these charitable enterprises is personally 
superintended by Her Majesty, who devotes a certain portion of her 
leisure to studying the reports, and thus becomes acquainted, with 
every detail of the various organizations. 



Mrs. Cleveland is said to be translating a novel from the French, 
but purely for her own amusement, and with no idea of publication, 
although no sooner did an inkling of her literary fad reach the ears 
of the publishers than she was overwhelmed with otters from the 
best established firms. She is a brilliant French scholar and writes 
an easy, clever letter, and her friends claim that her literary efforts 
are far above the average translations which reach the eyes of the 
public. 



Count Melchior de Vogue, the new " Immortal," occupies the pe- 
culiar and delicate position of Father Confessor to the fashionable 
world of Paris. Not that he is in holy orders, but it is his blessed 
mission to settle all fine points of difference among the mondaines, 
and it is said that he has settled more social rows and warded off 
more scandals from distinguished names than be could count twice 
over on his ten aristocratic fingers. He gradually found himself in 
this original and, one can imagine, sufficiently difficult position by 
means of his good common sense and his infinite tact and discretion. 



Mrs. Larelda Wallace, the mother of General Lew Wallace, is a 
strong advocate of Woman's Suffrage, and has been stumping the 
State of Arkansas in the interest of the cause. She is very eloquent, 
and her age and earnestness have everywhere won her great consid- 
eration and some enthusiasm. 

Rumor has it that George Vanderbilt, the youngest son of the late 
William H. Vanderbilt, is to write a book that will deal with the early 
history of New York— when it was New Amsterdam. He is the only 
one of the family who has literary tastes, and in his case they are 
very marked. He cares nothing for society, has no small vices, and 
is happiest when he is in his library in the Fifth avenue Vanderbilt 
palace, a room that is a very Paradise of rare books and manuscripts, 
and all else that could inspire a scholar and antiquarian. 

The Duchess of Marlborough, formerly the wealthy Mrs. Hamers- 
ley, has become a professional beauty in London. She used to be 
immensely stout, but is said to have brought down the superfluous 
adipose tissue, and now weighs only about one hundred and forty 
pounds. She and the " noble Juke " have furnished a superb home 
in London, and her photographs are for sale both in London and 
New York among " English Professional Beauties." 



Ouida began her literary career by writing short stories for the 
English magazines, for which she was glad to receive £1 a page. Her 
English publisher now pays her $7,000 for every book she writes. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE, 



Nevada Queen Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Tuscarora Mining District, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 21st day of December, 1S88, an assessment (No. 4) of Fifty Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, room 52, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 28th day of January, 1889, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made he- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the 25th day of February, 1889. to pay the 
deliuquenl assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

HENRY DEAS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 52, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. [Dec. 29. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company, 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California; loca- 
tion of works— Silver Star Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
on the 27th day of December, 1888, an assessment (No. Zy of Twenty-five 
Cents (25c) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, room 69, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 31st Day of January, 1889 will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the 25th day of February, 1889, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. ■ 

Office— Room 79 Nevada Block, No. 30y Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. |"Dec. 29. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Savage Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of Business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
on the 7th day of January, 1889, an assessment (No. 721 of Fifty Cents (50c) 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United states gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, room 4, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 11th day of February. 1889, wilt be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the 4th day of March, 1889, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 

Office— Room 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. * ["Jan. 12. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Union Consolidated Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works — Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 4th day of January, 1889, an assessment (No. 37) of Twenty-five 
Cents (25c) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, room 11, No. 303 California street, San Francisco, 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 8th day of February, 1889, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold ou FRIDAY, the 1st day of March, 1889. to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses I 
Of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. M. BUFFINGTON, Secretary. 

Office— Room 11, No. 303 California street, San Francisco, Cal. [Jan- 12. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

North Belle Isle Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works — Tuscarora, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held j 
on the 3d day of January, 1889, an assessment (No. 14) of Fifty (50) [ 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, pay- 
able immediately iu United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office 
of the Company, No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shallremain unpaid on 
The 6th day of February, 1889, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at publrc auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 27th day of February, 1889, to pay 
the deliuqent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. W. PEW, Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Fine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. [Jan. 12. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



Gould & Curry Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 61 

Amount per Share 30 Cents 

Levied . January 10, 1889 

Delinquent in Office February 14, 1889 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock March 7, 1889 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. | Jan. 12. 

Complete sets of Artotypes can be had at the News Letter office, Flood 
Building, corner Market and Fourth streets. Price, ten cents each. 



Jan. 1!>, 188!) 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



25 



PHONOGRAPH! 

Tin- Pacific Phonograph Company, holdings license 
for the States of California, Nevada and Arizona, are 
now ready to receive orders for the lease of Phonographs 
and Phonograph-Graphophones. 

Tin' Company will receive its proportionate share of 
instruments as rapidly as they can be delivered from 
the factory, but in consequence of the largo territory to 
be Bupplied, the number will probably be limited for the 
next six months, and they will be supplied to subscribers 
in the order of their applications. 

The instruments are perfect recorders of the human 
voice in conversation or song, and of instrumental music 
of every possible character and kind. It speaks for itself 
as against all adverse criticism, and the credulous and 
skeptical are alike bewildered at the wonderful perfec- 
tion of its work. 

It is simple in its mechanism, andean be manipulated 
by the most obtuse novice with a few hours' instruction. 

It is a rapid and faultless stenographer. As a letter- 
writer is fluent as speech, and transmits the exact tone 
of the correspondent's voice. It is a perfect musician 
for the human voice or any musical instrument. 

Every record once made can be reproduced an indefi- 
nite number of times. 

'i he Phonograph and Phonograph-Graphophones will 
be exhibited to those who desire to become patrons, at 
the office, 323 Pine Street. 

Having thus far but one of each instrument, we can- 
not at this time make our exhibition more general. 

THE SAN FRANCISCO AND OAKLAND MUTUAL LOAN ASSOCIATION. 

The Directors of the San Francisco Mutual Loan Association, having 
issued the full number of 5,000 shares of stock permitted by the charter, 
and receiving continued application for shares, principally from laborers 
and mechanics who intend to avail themselves of the facilities offered by 
these meritorious institutions to build homes for their familiesaud lay aside 
a portion of tlieir wages in a safe and remunerative place, have decided to 
organizes new society, to be called "The San Francisco and Oakland' 
Mutual Loan Association." 

The By. Laws of the San Francisco Mutual Loan Association have been 
substantially adopted, and the same Directors and officers who have brought 
this corporation to its present remarkable success have kindly consented to 
serve in the new Association, which is a guarantee of its honest manage- 
ment and success. 

By the sixth aunual report of the San Francisco Mutual Loan Association 
it will be seen that in the short spaee of six years its members have paid 

into the Association ' $198,222 

And have earned 62,; 86 



Making an accumulation to the credit of the members $255,808 

This large sum is safely loaned out to the members themselves, first 
mortgage real estate security aud shares of the Association only being ac- 
cepted as security for loans. The large earnings made by the Association 
will be seen by the following list, which shows the amount paid on each 
share, the earnings aud the present value: 

Series. Paid in. Earned. Present value. 

First $72 00 .*. $28 23.7 $100 23 

Second 60 00 21 12 81 12 

Third 41 00 15 67.. 63 67 

Fourth 36 00 9 59 45 59 

Fifth 24 00 5 85 29 ftt 

Sixth 12 00 2 53. 14.3 

The books for subscription to 1,500 shares of the first series of the San 
Francisco and Oakland Mutual Loan Association are now open at the offices 
of the Secretary, 307 Sausome street, adjoining the Bank of California, in 
Sau Francisco, during business hours, and corner Seventh aud Willow 
streets, West Oakland, on Monday and Thursday, between 6 and 8 o'clock 
p. M. 

Each person is allowed to take not less than five nor more than fifty 
shares. Children can subscribe by their parents or guardians, and married 
women can take stock in their own name. 

THOMAS J. WELSH, President, 
A. Sbarboro, Secretary. [Jan. 19. 

LOUIS R0EDERER CHAMPAGNE. 
The Highest Grade Champagne in the World. 

C-A.E.TE BLAETCIEB" 

(WHITE LABEL) 3 

A MagQificeut JRich Wine. 
" G-J3,J±.35TJD "VI35T SIEC " 

{BROWN LABEL) ' 

Perfection of a Dry Wine. 

See that every Bottle bears the private label of 

MACONDRAY & CO., 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 




ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 



If you have caepets that need to be beat, 
Send to the S. F. Carpet Beaters, 23 Tenth street. 
8. Ferguson's work is prompt and neat. 



Loca- 



St. i_< - tie Milium Company. 

Looalton of piinolpn business— 8»n Frsaolsoo, California 

.'.'■rk.s Gold mil. Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice [a hereby givon that at attesting of the Board of Directors, hv\<\ mi 
the fourteenth 1 1 ittai day ol January, IBB*, an assessment (No. 2)oI Five Cents 
(6c.) per share was, levied upon the capital stock <>f the corporation, pay- 
able Immediately in [Jutted States gold coin, to the Secretary »i 1 1 1 « - on 
the Company, mom 7i', Nevada Block, No. 80y Montgomery street, Sao 
Francisco, California. 

Auy stuck upon which this assessment shall remain uupaid on 

The elqhice th (18(h) day ol February. 1889, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be .sold on MONDAY, the eleventh (11th) day of March, 1889, to 
pay the delinquent a^eshinent, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
peaces of saie. By orderof the Board of Directors, 

W. E. DEAN, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block. No. 309 Montgomery street, Sau Fran- 
cisco, California, fjan. 19. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Overman Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— Sau Francisco, California; loca- 
tion of Works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice iB hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the 15th day of January, 1889, an assessment (No. 59) of Tweuly-flve Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporatfou, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, No 414 California street, Sau Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain uupaid on 
The 19th day of February, 1889, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 12th day of March, 1889, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

GEO. D. EDWARDS, Secretary. 

Office— No. 414 California street, San Francisco, California. [Jau. 19. 

^ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Best & Belcher Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Fraucisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Virginia City, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meetiug of the Board of Directors, held 
on Thursday, the tenth (10th) day of January, 1889, an assessment (No, 42) 
of Twenty-five (25) Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secre- 
tary, at the office of the Company, Room No. 29, Nevada Block, 309 Mont- 
gomery street, Sau Francisco, Califoruia. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

Friday, the Fifteenth (16th) day of February, 1889, will be delinquent, 

and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on THURSDAY, the seventh (7th) day of March, 1889, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors 
F L. OSBORN, Secretary. 

Office— Room 29, Nevada Block, No. 303 Montgomery street, Sau Frau- 
cisco, Califo ruia. [Jan. 12. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

May Flower Gravel Mining Company, 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works-Forest Hill, Placer County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the fourteenth (l4thi day of January, 18f>9, an assessment (No. 44) of Fifty 
Cents (50c ) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, 328 Montgomery street, room 24, Sau Francisco, Cal. 

Auy stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

The eighteenth (18th) day ol February. 1889, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the eleventh (11th) day of March, 1883, to 
pay the deliuquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. Bv order of the Board of Directors. 
F J. MORIZIO, Secretary. 

Office— 328 Montgomery street, room 24, San Francisco, Cal. | Jan. 19. 

HENRY C. HYDE, 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR - AT - LAW. 

MICROSCOPICAL EXAMINER 

Of Handwriting, Inks, Papers, etc., in the Detection of Forgeries, 

Counterfeits and Imitations. 

4 1 1 V, CALIFORNIA STREET. San Francisco 

T7 QR Social Gatherings, whether 

Public or Private, there can he 

no more Elegant a Wine used than 



FINE TABLE 
WINES 

FROM OUR 

CELEBRATED ORLEANS 
VINEYARD. 




Producers 
of the 



Eclipse Champagne 

Its Delightful Taste, Delicate Fla 
vor and Absolute Purity should be 
sufficient recommendation to all true 



R CLIPS R 

Champagne 

530 Washington o't. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



In 



s; of Good Wine. But its crown- 



ing quality is, that, unlike Imported 
Champagnes, it has neither Brandy 
nor Alcohol added to it, and therefore 
even its freest use ne ver leaves one 
with a headache. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 19, 1889. 



THE GOLDEN GATE SPECIAL 



Commencing December 8, 1888, 

WILL LEAVE ) 

2:00 P. M. -Is A N FKANCISCO 2:0O P. M. 
( Every Saturday ) 

CONNECTING AT 

coxrnsrciii bltjffs j^isttd Chicago 

WITH ' 

Special Trains for all Eastern Cities. 
SOLID VESTIBULE TRAINS, 

COMPRISING . 

Pullman Drawing-room Sleepers, 

Dining Car, Smoker, 

Bath, and Barber-Shop. 

SLEEPING-CAR RESERVATION C \N BE SECURED IN ADVANCE 
613 $ MABKBT A STREET, ] 613 



(ABKET STREET,! 

San Francisco. 
[Dec. l.J 



DIVIDEND NOTICE, 

Office of the Mount Diablo Mill and Mining Company, 

San Francisco. January 14, 1889. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the above-named Company, 
a divideud (No. 12) of forty cents per share was declared, payable on MON- 
DAY, January 21, 1889, at the office of the Company. Transfer books will 
close on Wednesday, January 16, 1S89, at 3 o'clock p. M. 

R. W. HEATH, Secretary Mt. Diablo Mill and Mining Company. 
Office— No. 318 Pine street, rooms 16 and 17, Sau F rancisco, Cal. [Jau. 19. 

DIVIDEND 7 NOTICE. 

People's Home Savings Bank 
has declared its semi-aunual dividend as follows, and will be paid at tbelr 
banking offices on Market and Fourth streets, in the Flood Building, onaud 
after January 2, 1889: Ordinary Deposits, at the rate of 4.25 per cent, per 
annum; Term Deposits, at the rate 5.10 per cent, per annum; Stockholders, 
at the rate of 6 per cent, per annum. On all deposits the percentage is 
furthermore apportioned from date of deposit, the deposits thus bearing 
interest for ihe entire term of deposit. 
J. K. WILSON, COLUMBUS WATERHOUSE. 

Secretary and Cashier. [Dec. 29.] President. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, 
N. E. Corner Montgomery and Post Sts., 

San Francisco, January 2, 1889. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this 

day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of 4 l 4 per cent, per annum On 

alfdeposits for the six mouths ending December 31, 1888, free of all taxes, 

and payable from and after this date- 

Jan. 5.1 . ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



The German Savings and Loan Society, 

526 California Street. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1888, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five and one-tenth (51-10) percent, per annum on Term Deposits 
aud four and one-fourth (4%) per ceut. per annum on Ordinary Deposits, 
payable on aud after Wednesday, January 2, 1889. 

Dec. 29.] GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society, 
Northwest Corner of Powell aud Eddy Streets. 
For the half year ending December 31, 1888, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of five (5) per cent, per annum on Term Deposits, and 
four (4) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable 
on and after WEDNESDAY, January 2, 18S9. 
Dec 15.1 VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society, 

619 Clay Street. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1888, a dividend has been declared, 

at the rate of four and eighty one-huudredths (4 SO-100) per cent, per annum, 

on all deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Wednesday, January 2, 

1889. 

n ec . 29.1 CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE^ 

The Pacific Bank, 
has declared its regular semi-annual dividend, at the rate of eight per cent, 
per annum, ou the par value of the capital stock, and the same will be paid 
at its bauki ug house, ou the northwest corner of Pine and Sansome streets, 
San Francisco, on and after January 2, 1889. 
O. P. MINER, Secretary. [Dec. 29.] R. H. MCDONALD, President. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hawaiian Commercial and Sngar Company. 

Dividend No. 12 (Thirty Cents per share) of the Hawaiian Commercial 
aud Sugar Company, will be payable on and after FRIDAY, February 
1. 1889, at the office of the Company, 32T Market street. Transfer books will 
close Friday, January 25th, at 3 p. m. 

jau. 12.1 fc* H. SHELDON, Secretary. 



ANNUAL MEETING, 

Utah. Consolidated Mining- Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Utah Consolidated 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the Company, room23, Nevada 
Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California, on 
Wednesday, the thirtieth (30th) day of January, 1 889, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing year 
and the transaction of such other business as may come before the meeting. 
Transfer books will close on Saturday, January twenty-sixth (26th), at 12 
o'clock M. 

• A. H. FISH, Secretary. 

Office— Room 23, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. [Jan. 19. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

The California Powder Works. 

San Francisco, 12th January, 1889. 
Notice.— The annual meeting of the Stockholders of The California 
Powder Works will be held at the office. of the Company, No. 230 California 
street, on 

Monday. 4th February. 1889, at twelve (12) o'clock M. 
Transfer books will close on 1st February, at noon. 
Jan. 19.J JOHN F. LOHSE, Secretary. 

"Tnnual meeting. 

North Commonwealth Mining Company. 

The regular auuual meeting of the stockholders of the North Common- 
wealth Mining Company will be held at the office of the Company, No. 310 
Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, California, on 

Tuesday, the 22d day of January, 1889, at the hour of 12 o'clock M. 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Thursday. January 17, 1889, at 3 
o'clock p. M. J. W. PEW, Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. [Jan. 19. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Belcher Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Belcher Silver 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the Company, room 8, No. 
327 Pine street, Sau Francisco, California, on 

Tuesday, the 29th day of January, 1889, at 1 o'clock P.M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may properly come be- 
fore the meeting. Transfer books will close ou Saturday, January 26th, at 12 
o'clock M. JNO. CROCKETT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 8, No. 327 Pine street, Stock Exchange Building, San 
Francisco, California. [Jan. 19. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Home Mutual Insurance Company. 

Conformably to the provisions of Section 1 of the By-Laws of this Com- 
pany, the next annual meeting of the stockholders will be held at its 
principal office, No. 216 Sansome street, San Francisco, California, at 1 
o'clock p. u., on 

Monday, January 21, A. D. 1889, 
for the election of Directors to serve until their successors shall be elected 
under the provisions of the By-Laws. Polls will be open from 1 to 4 
o'clock. CHAS. R. STORY, Secretary. 

San Francisco, January 2, 1889. [Jan. 12., 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Oceanic Steamship Company. 
The regular annual meeting of stockholders of the Oceanic Steamship 
Company will be held at the office of the Company, 327 Market street, San 
Francisco, California, on 

Monday, the 21st day of January, 1889, at the hour of 11 A. M.. 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
vear, and the transaction of sflch other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Thursday, January 10th, at 3 o'clock 
p.m. ] | Jan, 12.] E. H. SHELDON. Secretary. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Crocker Gold and Silver Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Crocker Gold and 
Silver Mining Company will be held at the office of the Company, room 26, 
Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California, on 
Monday, the 21 si day of January, 1889, at the hour of 1 o'clock, 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and toe transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Thursday, January 17th, at 3 P. M. 

AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 
Office— Room 26, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. Uau. 12. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Del Monte Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Del Monte Mining 
Company will be held at the office of the Company, No. 310 P. ne street, 
rooms loaud 17, San Francisco, California, on 

Wednesday, the 23d day of January. 1889. at the hour of 12 o'clock M. 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Friday, January 18. 188J, at 3 o'clock 
P. m. J- W. PEW, Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. [Jan. 12. 

ANNUAL MEETIN6. 

Anglo-Nevada Assurance Corporation. 
The fourth annual meeting of the stockholders of the Anglo-Nevada 
Assurance Corporation will be held at the office of the corporation, at No. 
410 Fine street, San Francisco, on 

Monday. January 21, 1889, at 3 o'clock P. M., 
Jan. 12.J LOUIS SLOSS, President. 



Jan. l!», 1889. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Train* Lomvo and »r« Due lo Arrive at 
SAN FRANCISCO: 

have I From January IS. I8F9. I arrive 



7:S0a. 
7:30 a. 

SOOa. 



10:30 a. 
•12 00m. 
•1:00 p. 

flMr. 



I 



4:00 p. 


4:30 p. 


•4:30 p. 


5:80 p. 



i for Utjwfcrdi, Nili'MUtd Sauj 
I Jose ...... . 

[fbr Sacramento, and for Red-* 
j din* via Davis i 

uforMarUaes, VaUeJo, Calirto j 
| ga aud Santa Ro»a . 
(For KUea, tea lose, Btooktoa, 
\ Gali. lone, Beonunento 
( Mary.-vlUe end Bed Bluff 
(Lm Angelaa Bzprass, for Pree-i 

< uo, Sauta Barbara aud Los> 
i Annies.. > 
. Tor Hay wards* aud Nile* 

FOt Hay ward n and Nik's 
Sacramento River Steamers 
(Golden Uatv Special, for* 
I Council Bluff? aud Beat , 
(For Hay wards, Nilea aud Sauj 

I JOM i 

(Ceutral Atlautie Express, for* 
I Ugdeu and East ) 

♦.For Stocktou aud $Miltou ; fori 

< Vallejo, Calistoga aud San-> 
( ta Bon. f 

iFor Sacramento aud forf 
Knight a Landlug via Davis., 
Poi Hues, Sau Jose aud Liv-| 
ermore i 

For Hay wards and Klles 

f Shasta Route Express, tor") 

I Sacrameiito, Marysville. I 

Redding, Portlaud, Puget f 

I, Souud and East . J 

(Suuset Route, Atlautie Ex- 1 
press, forSauta Barbara, Los 1 
Angeles, Demlng, El Paso, f 
New Orleans aud East J 



'12:46 r. 
7:15 P. 
6:15 P. 

6:45 P. 



2:15 P. 
•3:46 P. 
••6:00A. 

119:46 P. 
9:46 a. 
11:46 a. 
10:15 a. 



•8:45 a. 
7:45 a 



South Pacific Coast Railway Division. 



,3:00. 



17 :20 P. 
5:50 P. 



. For Newark and San Jose 

, (For Newark, Centerville, Sam 
*:ioa. < Jose. Felton, Boulder CreekS 

( and Santa Cruz J 

(For Centerville, San Jose, Fel-i 
2:15 P.I \ ton, Boulder Creek and> 

i ( Sauta Cruz ) 

i -lip | For Centerville, 8an Jose, Al-j 
1 • I ( madeu and Los Gatos ( 

Northern Division (Fourth and Townsend Sts). 

For Meulo Park and Way Stations 
'For San Jose, Gilroy, 'Ires) 
Pinos, Pajaro, Sauta Cruz, 
Monterey, Saliuas, San Mi 
guel, Paso Robles aud Tern- 
pleton (San Luis Obispo) 
aud principal Way Stations. 
For San Jose, Almaden aud 

Way Stations . \ 

For Cemetery, Menlo Park ( 

and Way Stations } 

For 8an Jose, Tres Pinos, » 
Santa Cruz, Monterey, and> 
principal Way Stations. . ; 
iFor Sau Jose aud principal* 
( Way Stations ( 

For Melilo Park and Way Stations 
For Menlo Park aud Way Stations 
\ For Meulo Park aud principal / 
| Way Stations ( 



7 :50 a. j 


8:30 a. 


10:30a. 


12:01 P. 


•3:30 P. 


4:30 P. 


•5 -.OOP. 
b :30 p. 


+11:45 p. 



•7:56 a 

6:35 a. 

f7:40p. 



a. for Morning. p. for Afternoon, 

•Sundays excepted. ^Saturdays only. 

(Sundays only. ^Saturdays excepted. ■ 

|[Fridays only. **Mondays excepted. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST AND BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3 o'clock p. M., for YOKO- 
HAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at Yoko- 
hamawith Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Steamer. 1889. 

Arabic Thursday, January 24. 

Oceanic Wednesday, February 13. 

Gaelic Saturday, March 2. 

Beloic Thursday, March 2P. 

Arabic Saturday, April 6. 

Oceanic Tuesday, April 23. 

Gaelic Saturday, May 11. 

Belqic Saturday, May 25. 

ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES. 

Cabin Plans on exhibition aud Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at the 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, or at 
No. 202 Market street ( Union Block) San Francisco. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 
GEO H.RICE, Traffic Manager. f Jan. 12. 



MY GIRL. 

A little corner with Its crib, 

A little [nag, b spoon, ■ bib, 

A Little tooth bo nearly white, 

A little rubber ring to bite. 

A Little plate all lettered round, 

A little rattle to resound, 

A little creeping— see I she stands, 

A little step 'twill outstretched hands. 

A little doll with flaxen hair, 

A little willow rocking chair, 

A little dress of richest hue, 

A little pair of gutters blue. 

A little school day after day, 

A little "schooltna'aru" to obey, 

A little study — SOOn 'tis past — 

A little graduate at last. 

A little muff for winter weather, 

A little jockey-hat and feather. 

A little sack with funny pockets. 

A little chain, a ring and lockets. 

A little while to dance and bow, 

A little escort homeward now, 

A little party somewhat late, 

A little lingering at the gate. 

A little walk in leafy June, 

A little talk while shines the moon, 

A little reference to papa, 

A little planning with, mamma. 

A little ceremony grave, 

A little struggle to be brave, 

A little cottage on a lawn, 

A little kiss— my girl was gone. 

— Hamilton Times. 



27 
SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 

— AND— 

SONOMA VALLEY RAILROADS. 

"THE DONAHUE BROAD-GAUGE ROUTE." 

COMMENCING SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, I 
until further notice, Boats aud TraltL. will 
leave from aud arrive at the Sau Fraun 
suiiger Depot, MARKET-STREET WliARK, ait 
follows: 



A Good Investment.— The San Francisco 
and Oakland Mutual Loan Association is a 
most excellent organization, with a definite, 
helpful object in view. Books for subscrip- 
tion to Hfteen hundred shares of the new ser- 
ies of stock issues are now open at the Secre- 
tary's offices, 307 Sansome street, San Fran- 
cisco, during business hours, and on the cor- 
ner of Seventh and Willow streets. West Oak- 
land, Mondays and Thursdays between six 
and eight o'clock p. m. Women and children 
can subscribe, and thus have a good invest- 
ment in the shares of the association. 



The Hotel Vendome, San Jose, will open 
February 1st for the reception of guests, and 
the formal house-warming and opening ball 
will occur on February 22d, when the attention 
will be divided between Washington's birth- 
day and that of the bouse. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's Steamers will sail 
For New York via Panama, 
S. S. Acapulco . . Wednesday, Jan. 23, at 12 noon. 
TakiDg Freight and Passengers direct for Aca- 
pulco, Champerico, San Jose de Guatemala, Aca- 
jutla, La Libertad, La Union, Amapala, Coriuto, 
Punta Areuas aud Panama. 



For Hongkong via Yokohama, 

S. S. City of Sydney Monday, Feb. 4, at 3 p. m. 

8. S. City of Rio de Janeiro .Feb. 21st. at 3 p. m. 
8 S. City of New York Monday, March 11, at 3 p.m. 
8.8. City of Peking .Thursday, March 28, at 3 p. m. 

Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and return at 

reduced rates 
For Freight or Passage apply at the Office, cor- 
ner Firstand Branuan streets. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

General Agents. 
Geo. H.Rice, Traffic Manager. [Jan. 19. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

Carrying U. S., Hawaiian and Colonial Mails. 

Will leave the Company's Wharf, foot of Steuart 
and Folsom streets, 

For Honolulu: 
S. 8. Australia (3,000 tons) . .Jan. 29, 1889, at 3 p. M 

Fop Honolulu, Auckland and 
Sydney, Without Change: 
The Splendid New 3,000-ton Iron Steamer 

Alameda Saturday, Feb. 9th, at 3 p. M 

Or immediately on arrival of the English mails. 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar- 

JOHN D. SPRECKELS & BKOS., 
Jan. 19.1 General Agents. 



Leave S. F. 


Destination. 


Arrive in s, f. 


Week 

Days. 


Sundays 


Sundays 


Week 

Days. 


7:40 a.m. 8:00 a. m. 
8:30 p.m. 5:00 p.m. 
5:00 p.m.I 


Petaluma 

aud 

Santa Rosa. 


10:40 a.m 
6:10p.m 


8:60 a.m. 
11:40 a.m 
B;06p, m. 


::::::! ■.:::•: 

7:40a. m.|8 :00a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 


Fulton 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Cloverdale <& 

Way Stations. 


6:10 p.m. 


11:40 a.m 
6:05p.m 


7:40 a.m. 


8:00a.m. 


Guerueville. G:10p. M. 


6:05 p.m. 



3:30 p. M. Is :00 a. m. 



Sonoma ami ,,, ,,, 

Glen Ellen. ;W-40a.m. 8:50a. K. 



GOLD, 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for White Sulphur 
Springs, Sebastopol and Mark West Springs: at 
Geyserville for Skaggs Springs, aud at Cloverdale 
for Highland Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, 
Lakeport, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Bartlett 
Springs, Ukiah, Vichy Springs, Navarro Ridge, 
Mendocino City aud the Geysers. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days—To Petaluma, $1 75; to Sauta Rosa, *3: to 
Healdsburg, $4 ; to Cloverdale, $5; toSouoma $1.50- 
to Glen Ellen, $2.25. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for 8unday only- 
To Petaluma, $1 50; to Sauta Rosa, $2; to Healds- 
burg, $3; to Cloverdale, $4 50; to Guerueville, $8; 
to Sonoma, $1; to Glen Ellen, J1.50. 

From San Francisco for Point Tiburon and San 
Rafael, Week Days— 7:40, 9:40 a. m.; 3:30, 500, 615 
P.M. Sundays— 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M.; 5:00 p. M. 

To San Francisco from San Rafael, Week Days— 
6:20, 7:55, 10:40 A.M.; 3:40, 6:05 p. M. Sundays— 810 
9:40 a. M.; 3:40, 5:00 p. m. ' ' 

To San Francisco from Point Tiburon, Week 
Days— 6:50, 8:20, 11:05 A. M.; 4:05,5:30 p. m. Sun- 
days— 8:40, 10:05 A. M. ; 4:05, 5:30 p. M. 

On Saturdays an extra trip will be made from 
San Francisco to Sau Rafael, leaving at 2:00 p. m. 
H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

General Supt. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 

CVTICKET OFFICES— At Ferry, 222 Montgomery 
Street and No. 2 New Montgomery Street. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: 

The steamers MEXICO and UMATILLA direct 
for VICTORIA, B. C, aud Pt'GET SOUND ports 
at 9 a. M. every Friday. 

The steamer UMATILLA, sailing every other 
Friday, at 9 a. m., connects at Port Townsend 
with Steamers IDAHO aud ANCON for Alaska. 

Foe PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with 
the O. R. AND N. CO., every four days. 

FOE SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, San 
Simeon, Cayucos, Poet Harford, 8an Lois Obis- 
po, Gaviota, -Santa Barbara. San Buenaven- 
tura, Hueneme, San Pedro, Los Anoeles and 
San Dieoo, about every second day. 

Foe EUREKA, ARCATA and HOOKTON, Hum- 
boldt Bay, Tuesday, at 9 a. m.— LOS ANGELES. 

For POINT ARENA, MENDOCINO, etc., ever* 
Monday and Thursday, at 4 p. m. 

TICKET OFFICE-No. 214 Montgomery street, 
Near Pine. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 

Sept. 1.] No. 10 Market street, Sau Fraucisco. 

CUNARD LINE. 

NEW YORK TO LIVERPOOL via QUEENSTOWN. 
From Pier 40, North River— Fast Express Mail Service. 

Gallia.. Jan. 19, 6:30 a.m. I tlmbria Feb.16, 5:30 a.m. 
Servia Jan. 26, 1pm. I Servia . . Feb. 23, noon. 
Etruria Feb.2, 6:30 a.m I Etruria.Mar. 2. 5:30 a.m. 
Aurauia. ..Feb. 9, noon. | Aurauia March, y, 11 a.m 

Cabiu passage, $60, $80 and $100: intermediate, 
$35. Steerage tickets to and from all parts of 
Europe at very low rates. 

For freight and passage apply to the Company's 
offices, 4 Bowling Greeu, New York. 

VERNON H. BROWN & CO., General Agents. 

Good accommodations eau always be secured on 
application to WILLIAMS, DIMOND 4 CO., Ageuts 
Sau Francisco. [Jan. 19. 

Ton can live at home and make- more money at work fot us 
I than at anything else In the world. Either sex : nil aucs. Cost- 



ty outfit FUEE. Terms FHEE. Address, TBUE & Co., Augusta, Maine. 



28 



8 AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 19, 1889. 




" — 7 ROM what has recently transpired in the German, colonizing 
/ schemes, it was to be* expected that the debate which took 
U place iii the German Reichstag on Tuesday last on the sub- 
ject of the colonial estimates took the form it did. Although 
the vote on the question of supply was in favor of the Govern- 
ment, the occasion was notable for the decided stand taken by the 
Liberal leaders, and for their pluck in attacking Bismarck. It was 
said at a Liberal meeting of the Deputies previously, that the pre- 
tended anti-slavery campaign was only a pretext for masking the 
failure of the colonial policy, and of this there is little doubt, as until 
the powers at the German Foreign Office found themselves in a mess 
about the colonization projects, never a word was said about sup- 
pressing the slave trade, for which they never cared a straw, but in 
order to induce England to help them ont of the scrape, all of a sud- 
den they feigned great solicitude about its suppression. The discus- 
sion that took place in the Reichstag proves that a broad gulf'and a 
bitter antagonism exists between the different parties in affairs of 
State, and from what transpired at this sitting, it may be conjectured 
what will occur when the East African bill is put before the House. 
Bismarck is evidently desirous of keeping on good terms with Eng- 
land to help him pull the chestnuts out of the fire, and then— On suce 
Vorangconenjette Veeorce. It is evident that the English public is 
imbued with the idea, and rightly too, that all the trouble of Ger- 
many in her colqriial schemes is solely of her own making, and that 
it is not the business of England to help her out of them. 

Sir R. Burton, the fellow-traveler of Captain Spekein former African 
explorations, and one who ought to know, in speaking of the position 
of affairs at Suakim, says, in a letter to the Times, that to make the 
game worth the candle there, England must clear it of its Egyptian 
clique and re-embark the last Egyptian soldier en route to the Valley 
of the Nile. He would not expose British troops to the climate of the 
Red Sea littoral, but the Indian Sepoy could resist the exile until 
such time as peace could be made with the tribes; a native Soudan- 
ese contingent be raised, armed and disciplined, and the country 
settled on the firm basis of commerce and friendly intercourse. Fur- 
ther he says to his countrymen: After dispersing the Dervishes, 
seize the earliest opportunity of showing your magnanimity and 
come to terms with the gallant enemy upon the express condition 
that no Egyptian official, civil or military, shall ever pollute the land 
with his presence. And, if this step fail — which it will not — to restore 
peace, atonement will at least have been offered for the bloody mis- 
deeds of the past.. In advocating this treatment of the Suakim 
affairs, Sir Richard presumes that the public is no longer blinded 
about the British occupation of Egypt. He s.ays the English entered 
the country for a purpose, which, as all experts know, wa? entirely 
Utopian. It will be impossible to teach the Moslems of the Nile Val- 
ley our civilization, but we shall remain among thetu upon suffer- 
ance; we shall be even welcome, after a fashion, to the fellah, so long 
as we half tax him, abate the nuisince of the Pasha, the Bey and the 
Greek village usurer. But this means that we must continue there 
for an indefinite time. The embarkation of the last British soldier 
will be followed by horrors far surpassing the worst " plagues of 
Egpyt" in the olden days. 

English statesmen are not the only ones who have been harrassed 
and oppressed by the condition of affairs on the Red Sea littoral. 
The Italians have had their little difficulties there also, and apropos 
of them, a good story— true or not we do not say — was current in 
Rome some little time ago. It is reported that Signor Crispi, the 
head of the Ministry, was seen kneeling before Michael Angelo's 
famous statue of Moses, in the Church of San Pietro in Vincoli, and 
was heard to fervently ejaculate: " Tell me, I beseech thee, Moses, 
how you managed to extricate yourself from the Red Sea." Unless 
the English rulers are cautious, there is every probability that they 
too may be greatly in need of the information yearned for by Signor 
Crispi. 

Signor Crispi, Italian Prime Minister, is without doubt an able man, 
but he is. neither an able nor a cautious minister, and he is by no 
means a man of war; therefore, the more important is it to notice 
that he not only recently used bellicose languagein the Italian cham- 
ber, but also permitted one of the ablest financiers in Italy to retire 
from the Cabinet rather than stint the public service, and in the end 
we fear he is likely to prove the Nemesis to a nation which still in its 
teens has not sufficient strength and resources to bear the strain of 
an ambitious and war-like policy. In Italy enormous sums have 
been voted for military purposes without a word of remonstrance, and 
her resources have been strained almost to the snapping point. The 
resignation of Signor Magliani, the Italian Chancellor of the Ex- 
chequer, who, through his position, is fully cognizant of the finan- 
cial state of the country, immediately after the carrying of a vote for 



£6.000,000 solely for the purpose of armament, is a warning that 
should be heeded by every Italian patriot.- It is tantamount to a 
declaralion that any further charge in taxation for military opera- 
tions will plunge Italy into immediate bankruptcy. It would be a 
good idea if Mr. Gladstone, while sojourning in Italy, and who did 
so much in helping to establish Italian unity, would give the Italians 
a little wholesome advice, of which they seem to stand in much need, 
which might be of good service to them in keeping them our of diffi- 
culties which Signor Crispi seems to be leading them into. It is stated 
when Mr. Gladstone is in Rome he will insist on an interview 
with the Pope in order to discuss the Irish question, but whether he 
will succeed in bringing the Pontiff over to his peculiar views is 
rather dubious. His Holiness may courteously listen, but we fancy 
Mr. Gladstone will certainly listen in vain. Although the re- 
port of Monsignor Persico, who was sent to Ireland by the Pope 
to investigate the existing state of affairs there has not been 
made public, we can fairly well judge of its nature from what 
Leo XIII has since said to his Irish children, which, roughly 
paraphrased, the remarks of the Pontiff would be in effect about 
as follows: You are demanding certain concessions and changes 
in government, and your agitation is lawful if conducted on 
a constitutional basis. But I am not the first occupier of the See of 
Rome who has been obliged to caution you to consider your ways. 
Gregory XVI twice had occasion to rebuke you and some of your 
prelates. Pius IX was constrained to check certain lines of agitation 
and sent Cardinal Cullen to keep you in order. I my&elf , in my letter, 
De Parnellio, warned you not through greed-of gain to mistake evil 
for good. Since then you have gone from bad to worse, and I hear- 
ing varying accounts of how things were, determined to send a man 
of tried prudence and sagacity, a skilled diplomat and an unbiassed 
witness, to report to me the truth. His report has filled me with 
anxiety, and I was obliged to write and forbid the use of what you 
call boycotting and plan of campaign in your agitation, such methods 
being unlawful and immoral. I regret that my utterances are not 
attended to, and I write again, desiring prompt and cheerful obedi- 
ence, i Should this not be rendered, you will incur spiritual penalties 
and censures, and possibly find yourselves under an interdict. As 
Mr. Gladstone seems to be able to.persuade some folks that black is 
white, if he gets the chance he may possibly convince the Pope that 
boycotting and the plan of campaign is the correct thing in Ireland. 

Muller's Optical Depot is frequently so crowded leaving only standing 
room: first come first served the rule. 135 Montgomery, near Bush. 

COLD WEATHER GOODS! 



M. J. FLAVIN & CO. 

" A COLD SPELL ! " 

We offer for the approaching cold and rainy weather everything in the 
line of 

Cardigan Jackets, Overcoats, Woolen Under- 
wear, Rubber Clothing, Woolen Hosiery, 
Gloves and Woolen Overshirts, 

At Greatly Reduced Prices. 

M. J. Flavin & Co., 

924= TO 928 HVCA-ZEaiKIIEl? STRIEIET, 

THROUGH TO ELLIS. 

Illustrated Price List Free on application, with new calendar for 1889. 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 

.A. QTTIET HOME, 

CENTRALLY LOCATED, 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT ANDjATTENTION. 

April 7. 1 WM. B. HOOPER. Manager. 




I ESTABLISH ED 1 800.] 
Vol. XXXIX. f*N fKANOI*e N l mber_32. 

Neavs Better 

Dcvorca to thc Leammo Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 

"y Journal of Thought. It (j to he found on file l'n a'' 
changes and Mart* throughout civilization, and is a rrtoantted authority on 
Banking, Insurance, Mining unit other Stocks— nil J\ieijlc Coast Industrie* 
and A 

•tntatistic icorlit the News Letter long since attained a front place, 
its columns are continuously ouottd from by papers scattered ov' r the 
. 
it ait A H Hum, its large circulation and injUuntial position make 

it particularly usefuL 
Printed and Published every Saturday hu the Proprietor, FREDERICK Marriott, 
Rood Building, Fourth and lfarfe t 8breet$, San Francisco. Annual Sub- 
scription, tnetuain | tie* aiot fon-uia, £5; Foreign, $r r . 
Registered at the Postofhce at San Francisco, California, as second-class matter. 

SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1889. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



LlAJklHG Ajri 
a Repudiating City and County. 1 
The Latest About lTohtbttlon.. . l 

American Railroad Securities 

Abroad ... .. i 
The Monroe Doctrine at the Pres- 
ent Time -.2 

Ballot Keform 2 

The Public Pound 2 

The Church Question, . 2 

n and Sloffgiug J 

Biiu.i Han's Buff a 

The District Attorney's Office.... 3| 
Tlu ihlldren's Playground ... . 3 
A niow at the Trusts 3 

4 

Borne Pet Animals— Dl Vernon... 5 
Sparks .6 

new War/are of the Now World.. 7 
Susannah Id a Parisian studio 7 
My Guide— Philip Margrave. (Tale) 8 
Early 'Frisco Kcmiuiscences 9 



Pleasure's Wand ... 

Bnortlng 

The World. Flesh and Devil 

Personalities 

Financial Review 

TOWD Crier 

Letter From Bologna 

Scientific and Useful. 

Real Property 

" Bis" 

Varieties 

Ivory ami Gold 

An Opinion That is an Opinion. . . 

News Lotter Postscripts. 

Suubeams 

Library Table. : 

Pot-Pourri— Poetry 

The New South 

Voodooism and Cannibalism in 

Hayti 

Deterioration of Cala. Cooks. ... 
Comments on Foreign Affairs 



AMERICAN RAILROAD SECURITIES ABROAD. 
The holders of American railroad securities abroad have taken 
alarm at the results of the rate-cutting war, and are considering 
what ought to be done about it. The Atchison, Topeka and Santa 
Fe* has just passed its dividend for the first time in years. Other 
roads have either done the same or declared an unusually low divi- 
dend. The consequence is that American railroad securities are 
greatly depressed in the money markets of the world. The London 
Statist, in recent issues, has very strong articles on the duties which 
the large financial institutions of both the United States and Great 
Britain owe to clients to whom they have sold American railway se- 
curities. It contends that the consequences of rate wars have become 
so disastrous to all concerned that some heroic remedy must be re- 
sorted to. Its remedy is apparently a very simple and common- 
sense one. It is that the holders of securities shall be sought out, 
registered and organized in such a manner as to make them influen- 
tial in the election of directors of the several companies; that when 
this is done, supposing that similar steps are taken on this side of the 
water, the offending railway officers shall be admonished by the 
voice of authority to desist from the practice of throat cutting, and 
that any one who thereafter offends shall be deposed as soon as the 
voting power can reach him. This is simply putting into operation 
the maxim that shareholders should protect themselves. Why they 
have not done so heretofore is because they have had no rallying 
point, no leaders and no organization. The Statist strongly holds 
that the large banking houses, and they alone, can supply this 
want. They have the knowledge which it is impossible for scattered 
shareholders to possess. They have the influence which the holders 
of the purse always have in times of financial distress. They are in- 
terested in seeing the securities on which they advance money made 
safe. They are peculiarly concerned in warding off any money crisis 
which the continued depression of railroad securities is likely to bring 
about. There is probably no railroad of magnitude in the country 
whose shareholders would decline to come to their call in a case of 
danger of suspended dividends. There is certainly none whose bond- 
holders would not seek refuge in that quarter in case of default of 
interest. The remedy proposed by the Statist is even more neces- 
sary among American shareholders than among English ones, be- 
cause the interests affected by the mad railroad wars of the period, 
are enormously larger here than there. When these interests are 
organized they will be all powerful, and thenceforward we may ex- 
pect to see railroad property managed with a reasonable regard for 
the rights of those who own it. Rate wars do no permanent good to 
anybody, but are productive of evil to all concerned. If not checked 
they will soon result in a serious set back to the industrial and finan- 
cial development of the country. 

The Borneman jury has a stiff job before it. By the way, that 
method of Mr. Borneman's— cutting out a page of his books when 
an ink-blot displeased his [esthetic eye— is something new in the ac- 
counting line. 



A REPUDIATING CITY AND COUNTY. 

Thf City of PlaoerviUa And the Ooontj of El Dorado, of which 
the said city forma h part, an |uat now being used very much to the 

detriment of the | d mime and credit ol California by nun 

Baatern newspapers. Two weeks ago we gave a sample from a New 
York paper of the kind .if criticism tbal Is being Indulged In at the 
expense ol our State. The facts were then unknown to ua, and we 
believed that a gross injustice was bi to both the City of 

Placerville and ESI Dorado Oonnty. We did not believe -we could 
not believe thai any section of a Btate bo jealous of her credit as Cali- 
fornia Is had been deliberately guilty, as was oharged. ol repudiating 

its honorably incur ret! liabilities. No Si ate in the Union baa B better 
record in the matter Of debt-paying than California. Years ago, 
when the Legislature incurred a debt specially prohibited by the < Ion- 
stitution, which the State might have legally, and even equitably, de- 
clined to recognize, she preferred lo ;i - nine the. obligation and pay 
the money rather than be subjected to the suspicion of being a repu- 
diating State. It was. then, with mortification that we read the sweep" 
ing charges made against our credit. We knew they were unjust so 
far as the State as a whole was concerned, and we believed they were 
equally so in regard to the city and county to which special reference 
was made. We believed we were doing the citizens of l'lacerville a 
service by calling their attention to the serious allegations of fraud 
and dishonesty leveled against them by reputable journals in the 
East, and by giving them an opportunity to answer the slanders. 
We furnished them with evidence of how our " exhibition on wheels " 
was being met with newspaper paragraphs, charging, with every cir- 
utnstance of detail, that California, and especially l'lacerville, in tha 
County of El Dorado, was not a fit place for an honest man to live in 
who did not wish to be robbed. Certain legal proceedings, said to 
have been had at Placerville, were cited as evidence that we are '• a 
lawless, debt-repudiating and rascally people." When we reprinted 
the slander from the Syracuse (N. Y.) Standard we did not doubt, for 
a moment, that the slander could and would be quicky and effectively 
answered. With feelings of chagrin and mortification we learn that 
no answer is possible. The damaging charges are true — too true. 
The City of Placerville has her corporate seal and the names of her 
Mayor and Councilmen attached to certain lawfully issued bonds for 
which she received full value, but which she now neglects and refuses 
to pay. No defense is even pretended to exist for this act of repudia- 
tion, and the face value of the bonds would long ago have been col- 
lected by due process of law but for a line of action which puts 
Placerville beyond the pale of civilization. When it was learned that 
a mandamus was about to issue to compel payment, the Mayor and 
Councilmen resigned, and the citizens of Placerville have ever since 
refused to elect their successors, and so it is that there is no one upon 
whom a legal process can be served. All the officials are refugees 
from justice, and the public sentiment in the city and county seems 
to approve their conduct. Some way must be speedily found to right 
this glaring wrong. The telling of it by exchanges all over the 
country is doing California more harm than our best efforts at ad- 
vertising the State are doing good. We do not at present know how 
a remedy can be most easily applied, but the Legislature is compe- 
tent to do that, and it should do it without hesitation or delay. This 
blot on the escutcheon of the State must be wiped out forthwith. 
Placerville can and must pay her debts. 

THE LATEST ABOUT PROHIBITION. 

Prohibition in Kansas has just been reported on by people who 
are not prohibitionists. Whatever the reader's views may be upon 
that subject, it will be interesting to listen to what these people have 
to say. They are business men, who profess to look opon the matter 
from a practical and economical standpoint. They are the Stock- 
holder's Committee of the Farmers' Loan and Trust Company of 
Kansas, and they say they refer to the subject as " a matter of finan- 
cial interest to our stockholders, and with no other motive than to 
apply the deductions obtained therefrom to the value of Kansas in- 
vestments." In Leavenworth County the saloons were closed in 
March, 1887, and commitments to the Penitentiary sank from thirty- 
six in 1886 to thirteen in 1887, and five during the first half of 1888. In 
Atchison County the saloons were closed in 1886, and sentences to 
the Penitentiary decreased from twenty-three in 1885 to thirteen in 
1886 sis in 1887, and but one during the first half of 1888. The Peni- 
tentiary has one hundred and four fewer inmates than a year ago, 
and " the jails of the State are practically empty." The proportion 
of paupers, which was one to every 750 persons in 1886, is now only 
one to 1,350. " Our observations," the committee says, " leads us to 
believe that this movement is a grand success in Kansas, which adds 
and will continue to add value to all the lands in the State," and they 
conclude by expressing the hope that the facts cited are " a strong 
argument in favor of loans in a State advancing so rapidly in moral 
as well as material progress." That is a new way of putting the case 
for prohibition, but it is one entitled to due consideration and to 
whatever weight may be justly attributed to it. We all know that 
the ability of a sober man to repay his creditor, all other things being 
eaual is likely to be greater than that of the man whose habits are 
not those of sobriety. If what is true of the individual is, in a still 
ereater degree true of the community as a whole, it follows that it is 
in every way safer, more profitable and better to loan money to a 
neonle with prohibition laws than to those without them. At any 
rate, that is the argument whiob experience has put mw the mouths 
of the Kansas bankers. 



-— — ■ ! — 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 26, 1889. 



THE MONROE DOCTRINE AT THE PRESENT TIME. 

If the utterances of certain of our public men in regard to foreign 
affairs, were intended tu be taken in other than a Pickwickian sense, 
it would be very clear that some of our politicians were inclined to 
"bite off more than they can chew." They are asserting that no 
nation, save the United States, must take part in completing the 
Panama Canal, or in doing any other act or thing on any portion of 
the North and South American continents. They so assert them- 
selves, because, whilst disavowing all thoughts of interfering with 
other lands, they claim a right to a kind of exclusive protectorate 
over all Americans from the region of the Esquimaux at the 
North to that of the Patagonians at the South. The Monroe doctrine 
for the time being is made to mean, in its applicability to the affairs 
of the Panama Canal, that we intend to touch nobody and, by .lingo, 
nobody shall touch us! Yet we are sending our powerful navy four 
thousand two hundred miles away down the South Pacific to drive 
the Germans out of an island there and, if necessary, crush and 
destroy their few old rotten warships. What part of the Monroe doc- 
trine applies to this transaction is not stated. One million of the 
most industrious, saving and worthy citizens of a friendly Republic, 
which greatly helped us in our hour of need, have sunk the vast sum 
of $320,000,000 in prosecuting the work of building a canal necessary 
to the commerce of the world. The whole of that amount will be 
lost to Frenchmen, and nearly a million families will be ruined if the 
canal be not pushed to completion. They ask their government to 
assist them by guaranteeing a loan or in such other way as may seem 
best. At this point the Senate of the United States interferes and 
declares, in substance, that if the French Government dares to do 
anything of the kind there will be war. Our good friends of " La 
belle France " may suffer general bankruptcy, ruin and want; but 
that is their individual affair, with which we are in no manner con- 
cerned. It is enough for us that we do not desire to build the canal 
ourselves and intend that nobody else shall. Just why we have 
formed that intention we do not clearly comprehend, but, no matter, 
we know we have formed it, and mean to go on pretending that we 
will fight for it, if necessary. In all this we take no account of the 
wishes of the independent State that really owns the territory through 
which the canal passes. The States of Colombia are anxious above 
all things that the French Government shall go on and finish the 
canal. We should feel the same way if we were in their place, and 
would feel greatly wronged if a stronger power interfered to crush an 
enterprise necessary to our life and well being. 

But then the Monroe doctrine must be maintained at all hazards. 
What is that doctrine? It was a mere recommendation by President 
Monroe in a message to Congress in 1823, which resulted in no favor- 
able indorsement in Congress and in no executive action. Four of 
the powers of Europe — Kussia, Austria, Prussia and France — having 
witnessed the overthrow of Napoleon, formed what was called the 
" Holy Alliance," and desired to convert the young Spanish-Ameri- 
can republics into monarchies, with sovereigns under their control, 
as Napoleon III. tried to do with Mexico in recent years. Great 
Britain, through Mr. Canning; endeavored to persuade this govern- 
ment to join her in thwarting this design. Mr. Monroe yielded so 
far as to say in his message that " any such attempt would be dan- 
gerous to our peace and safety;" but the matter stopped there. Two 
years afterwards the House of Representatives, as if wishing to re- 
cord a different opinion from that of the President, passed a resolu- 
tion on the same subject, in which it declared that" the people of the 
United States slould be left free to act in any such crises in such a 
manner as their own honor and policy at the time may dictate." 
That is the first, last and only authoritative pronouncement by Con- 
gress on the subject. There is nothing in it to justify the present 
strained interpretation of a doctrine never anywhere precisely formu- 
lated. Both " the honor and policy "of the United States at this 
time dictate the wisdom of allowing Frenchmen to go ahead, finish 
the canal, and rescue their spent money if they can. 

BALLOT REFORM, 

It is remarkable what a concensus of opinion there appears to be 
all over the country that a reformed ballot, which will secure secrecy 
and destroy the motive for bribery, has become an imperative neces- 
sity. There is no doubt but that the last Presidential election was the 
most corrupt in our history, and that it has done much to quicken 
the public conscience and create a demand on the part of honest and 
thoughtful men for reform. There is scarcely a Northern State that 
is not at this moment engaged in either passing or discussing with a 
view to its becoming law, a measure upon this subject. There is also 
a remarkable agreement that the ballots must be printed and dis- 
tributed by the State, to the end that, as nobody can be sure how a 
man votes, nobody will care to buy his vote. That is found by the 
working of the system elsewhere to be the essential feature in any 
truly reformed ballot. The law must take the voting paper into its 
own hands exclusively. The law must initiate it, print it, hold it, 
guard it, protect it against the touch of any person notits authorized 
agent, and deliver it to the voter, as he approaches to vote, out of the 
reach of all other persons. The system is not new. It has been tried 
elsewhere with satisfactory results that are beyond dispute. The 
way to do a thing is to do. it. Where there is an honest intention to 
adopt a really secret ballot there can be no difficulty in accomplishing 
the desired end. The way to do it is known wherever the politicians 
are not the sole guardians of the people's right to vote. 



THE PUBLIC POUND. 
This disgrace to San Francisco still flaunts its defiant, blood- 
stained, mud-bedraggled banner in the face of every decent oitizen of 
the city. The efforts to have the present disgraceful proceedings 
abolished and a better order of things established and maintamel has 
conle to nought. The hoodlum dog-catchers ran riot, and the per- 
secutions and cruelties endured by the poor animals are an outrage 
on civilization. A meeting was held at the rooms of the Society for 
the Prevention of Cruelty to. Animals on Thursday, January 24th. 
when the report of the Committee on Public Pound was read, which 
showed that the recent petition to have the President of that Society, 
Jacob Z. Davis, appointed pound-keeper had received nearly twelve 
thousand signatures, which shows .the general disgust prevalent 
everywhere, except among the hoodlum element, and the feeling that 
something should be done to remove the disgrace that will rest on the 
city so long as the present pound-keeper retains the office. The 
petition was presented to the Board of Supervisors, and on January 
Hth was referred to the Committee on Health, Police and House of 
Correction, consisting of Messrs. Philster, Barry, Becker, Ellert and 
McDonald. This committee reported the bill back without recom- 
mendation, with a dissenting minority report from Supervisor Ellert. 
who strongly recommended declaring the post of pound-keeper 
vacant and appointing Mr. Davis to the place. This matter came 
up on the 21st, and, in discussing the reports, Mr. Bingham moved 
an indefinite postponement, seconded by Mr. Barry, when Mr. 
Shadbourne, the Society's representative, spoke, being frequently in- 
terrupted in a brutal way by Mr. Lindo. After further discussion, 
the petition was again referred back to the Committee on Health and 
Police and House of Correction for further consideration. There the 
matter rests at present. It is to be huped that the better class of our 
citizens will make themselves heard in this matter and follow up the 
petitions with vigorous action and energetic language, until the Board 
of Supervisors will shake off the clutch of Jake Lindo and his infa- 
mous hoodlum dog-catchers and relegate the keeping of the ponnd to 
other management, which will not so constantly reflect upon the 
humanity of San Francisco. Let us have more petitions if necessary, 
and, if something more is needed, let us have that, whatever it may 
be decided to be. San Francisco should not rest until the public 
pound disgrace is remedied and its head deposed. 

SLOGGERS AND~SLOGGING. 

We venture to suggest that the California Legislature can win a 
crown of glory and an imperishable wreath of laurel if they will 
amend the present law on slogging matches— amend them firmly, 
clearly, and put an end, once and for ever, to certain brutal practices 
that have recently disgraced our metropolis. We have, upon our 
statute books, a salutary law approved by all good citizens, which 
prohibits " prize fighting in any hall or place where an admission 
fee is charged." This wise law has been shamelessly evaded by cer- 
tain athletic clubs of San Francisco, under whose auspices fights have 
been arranged, halls engaged and combats of the most brutal and de- 
grading character conducted. " No admittance fee " was charged, to 
be sure. None but " members of the club " were admitted, but, pre- 
paratory to the dehumanizing exhibition, the doors of " membership " 
had so widely opened as to admit pretty much every well-dressed 
ruffian to whom it would be a delight to behold one brawny human 
beast bruise and pommel and defacea fellow being. There was " no 
charge for admission," but the memberships' privilege of seeing the 
beastly performance was sold in some instances for no less than 
thirty dollars, and for three long hours several thousand mad, ex- 
cited, frenzied citizens watched a stalwart negro from Australia 
pound, bruise and disfigure a shapely young Irish-American— native 
son of the Golden West! Was the present law simply aimed at the 
collection of " an admission fee," or was it enacted for the purpose of 
putting a stop to " knock-outs" or " fights to the finish?" Of course 
there can be but one answer to this question. It was not the com- 
paratively innocent collection of an admission fee, but the brutal and 
brutalizing exhibition that the law was intended to suppress. It is 
the duty of this Legislature to so amend the law that this end shall be 
accomplished, and we hope and believe that they will, without need- 
less lapse of time, work this much needed reform. 



THE CHURCH QUESTION. 
Do as large a proportion of people go to church now-a-days as did 
when the old men of to-day were boys? The answer to that question 
is likely to be influenced by the answerer's peculiar horizon or by his 
immediate environments. If he should happen to live in one of the 
wilder regions of our State, he may well doubt whether people go to 
church at all, and he may even believe that Sunday has become an 
exploded institution. Even in San Francisco he maybe pardoned for 
thinking that church attendance is by no means what it was when he 
was a boy. But San Francisco is improving in that respect, as Mr. 
Moody was quick to discover upon his recent arrival. That church 
going the world over is not decreasing but is greatly increasing is an 
established fact, and this is as true in regard to the United States as 
of any other country that can be named. Figures recently published 
show that there are 115,010 churches and 17.072,^78 communicants in 
the United States. The vast sum of $163,000,000 has been raised for 
home and foreign missions in the last twenty years, and there is an 
average church attendance of four to one as compared with twenty 
years ago. 



Jan, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



3 



BLIND MANS BUFF. 
■tam N, w York daily, baring been told that H. M.SI 
ihe explorer, was loal somewhere or other in A.I 
terailued to send one*of its correspondents in icarch "t him. rhlfl 
was hardly an origin*! idee, having been exploited many years ago 
nuoh bigxer New York daily dispatching this same Stanley to 
hunt tor Livingstone. With a Hue sense ol the ludicrous, tho New 
York If or Jo* has chosen afr.Thomas Btevena as its Stanley-hunter. 
Mr. Stevens is Lhe gentleman who r> >dc rom San PranciBco 

to New York, crossed the Atlantic by the usual prosaic means, and 
then " wheeled himsell i a small portion ol Asia. 

Hi' took ■ passing glance at India, did a few miles in China, glanced 
at Japan and Hnaily landed at the Golden Gate a hero— among 
cyclists! Mr. Stevens undertook this journey as a perambulating 
advertisement for a firm ol bicycle manufacturers, and, at the 
seme time, contributed occasional letters t«> a migarine connected 
with out-door sports. Be ia a g I cyclist, and e«r ted h s pay. 

Unluckily, on ins return he listened t«> the advice of sumo " d — d 
atured friends,* 1 and w rote a book. Now, writing is one of the 
Mr. Stevens was never constructed tor. As long as his journey 
lay along the beaten track he worried ahead pretty merrily by re- 
basbing the gnide>books and the yarns of former tourists, but as 
soon as he got on virgin soil and bad a chance to be instructive and 
entertaining— to show the highest form of a writer of travels, in fact, 
to lie like a fisherman — he became as dumb as an oyster. 

His literary style needs a wig. As a traveler and explorer, he 
proved himself totally devoid of the slightest instinct of how to place 
himself m rapport with the strange peoples he journeyed among; 
and thai even when Introducing u novelty to them— that curbed in- 
vention ol Sbaitan, the bicycle ! 

And this is the man chosen to break ground in (to him) a new 
continent, and to take the lead of a band of natives in a march 
through some thousand miles of difficult, dangerous or deadly coun- 
try ; and all to play a game of blind man's bud' with two veterans who 
know their Africa as thoroughly as Kmin Pasha and H. M. Stanley! 

There is a phase of fUnniness about Mr. Stevens' " instructions," 
which is suggestive of a practical joke on the part of the New York 
World. He is to proceed in the first instance to Zanzibar. If on ar- 
riving there the fate of Eruin and Stanley is decided one way or other, 
he is to make a study of the East African slave trade and transmit 
his ideas in a series of letters. If the fate of the lost should be 
" doubtful,'' he is to proceed at once to Wadelai, and if he then finds 
they are in the hands of the Mahdi, he is to proceed to the Mahdi. 
This seems a cruel joke, but then it in some measure accounts for 
the WorW* choice of Stevens — they could spare him better than any 
one else. Hut they should have given him his trusty bicycle. Let us 
Suppose that by great good luck Mr. Stevens had escaped the Masai, 
the SawabilH and the Nyam >'yam tribes; what a sight for sair een 
it would be to see him " scorching " (bicyclists' term. — Ed.) into 
Khartoum! And imagine El Mahdi in the gate of the city, interrupt- 
ing himself in the infliction of justice at the approach of this uncanny 
apparition, with the words : "In the name of the Prophet! What 
manner of camel is this that the Kafir dog bestrideth? Would he 
practice incantations upon us? Take off his head ! " A sorry jest on 
Stevens, O New York World, to set a child to do a man's work. 



THE DISTRICT ATTORNEY'S OFFICE. 
The Legislature, by express enactment, conferred upon the Board 
of Supervisors of San Francisco the power of appointing the third 
assistant District Attorney for this city and county. There must 
have been a reason for taking away the power of appointing one of 
his deputies from the District Attorney. We have a recollection that 
there was. It is very certain that there may often be an advantage 
in having at least one prosecuting officer independent of the District 
Attorney's office. It proved' to be so during the trial of the jury- 
rixers, and the same thing may happen again at anytime. Mr. 
Walker C. Graves well and faithfully did his duty during that critical 
period, and inspired a degree of confidence in his management of 
criminal cases that would not otherwise have attached to the District 
Attorney's regime of that period. When cases arose in regard to 
wh c j there was reason to fear Major Stonehill's views might be 
peculiar, the presiding Judge, in the exercise of that discretion which 
is wisely vested in him, invariably assigned such cases to the court 
in which Mr. Graves was the prosecuting officer. Having discharged 
his onerous duties with satisfaction to the Court, the Bar and the 
public, there was no conceivable reason why the appointing power 
should not continue its confidence in its appointee, and it has done 
so. But District Attorney Page very strenuously objects. He insists 
that if he has to be responsible for the prosecution of criminal cases 
he must have the appointment of all the prosecuting officers. To 
this the answer is simple. No one will hold him responsible for any 
mistakes Mr. Graves may make. The law declares who shall ap- 
point, and that ought to be final. The Board of Supervisors is re- 
sponsible and cannot rid itself of the responsibility, if it would. Mr. 
Page, who we believe is desirous of making a good record in office, is 
doing himself an injustice by his rebellion against the law, which he, 
of all men, ought to respect. He is in a false position, and cannot too 
soon retreat from it. He is giving color to the stories of his enemies, 
which we do not believe, and therefore do not repeat. No harm, but 
much good may come of the appointment of an independent prose- 
cuting officer as acceptable as the one to whom Mr. Page objects. 



THE CHILDREN'S PLAYGROUND. 

Thmv is a lot of talk about town just now anenl lhe way the 
Sharon fund leii to (he Park was spent! Every other m 
thinks he could have made a wiser use of the rnon 
of every ten women imagines' her children are personally abused 

because the playhouse does not provide free tricycles, free roller 

skates, free lunches, tier every t hi iif;. Wise men and sages o| ft] 
have long BinCS found it is ever a thankless (ask to serve the pUblJC. 
Tlir be |ues[s thai men, .lying, have left behind them OS monuments 

to their fame, or indications ol their gratitude towards the commu- 
nity where their wealth was ae | n i reii, are nearly alwa 
subjects ol Fault-findings, bitterest, acrimony and endless critioisms. 
From the I.iek bequest down to the completion of the Sharon play- 
bouse, the general publie, for whose hmrlil alone these works were 
planned, have received the well-meant efforts of trustees and coin- 
misdcn -rs with a black suspicion, to which Oato'a was as sunlight to 
darkness. The Park Commissioners are honorable men, my lords- 
men of position, wealth, integrity — and they give liberally of their 
time and ability, solely through a public-spirited de-sire to see their 
city in possession of a noble park. They receive as remuneration 
for their services, alas, not even thanks or appreciation. The present 
Board of Directors have labored faithfully to use the Sharon fund to 
the best advantage. If the results are not satisfactory to the ma- 
jority of the people and the editors of the Post, they can console 
themselves with the reflection that Moses, the greatest lawgiver of 
the wjrld, was painfully misunderstood by a large contingent of his 
chosen chiefs. The idea of providing a resort for children where all 
amusements should be free is too impracticable for a moment. Such a 
place would become the hunting-ground of hoodlums and roughs, 
speedily be voted a nuisance, and no self-respecting parents wou Id 
trust their children within its limits. There are a reasonable number 
of free diversions now— swings, spring-boards, sand-boxes, etc. — and 
the charges for lunch and the other amusements are so low as to 
come within the means of any one who can afford to send their off- 
spring to the Park. It is human to err. It is especially human to 
find fault, but mercy should temper judgment till facts, figures and 
estimates that are open to all have been examined, weighed in the 
balance and found wanting. 

A BLOW AT THE TRUSTS. 
The vexed question of whether or not the trusts are illegal com- 
binations which the law can deal with is in a fair way of a solution 
that leaves nothing to be desired. Judge Barrett, of the Supreme 
Court of New York, has struck a blow that is likely to he very far- 
reaching in its consequences. It was a test case, and is likely to 
prove the most conclusive of the many now before the courts in dif- 
ferent parts of the country. The claim of the Attorney-General on 
behalf of the people was that the defendant company, by merging its 
separate corporate independence in that of the Sugar Trust Com- 
piny, had become liable to dissolution for an abuse of its powers, and 
nas exercised privileges not conferred upon it by law and inimical to 
the public good. Judge Barrett's long decision is remarkably ex- 
plicit, and will supply an interesting study to lawyers for some time 
to come. He holds that the directors of each separate company 
must direct its affairs with an exclusive regard for its own particular 
transactions, and must not group, pool or mix them up in any way 
with the affairs of any other corporation. The paying over of the 
funds into a pool for the benefit of other corporations he declares a 
misappropriation of funds, of which the law will take cognizance in a 
very stern way. The Judge says: " Fortunately the law is able to 
protect itself against abuses of the privileges which it grants, and, 
while further legislation may be suitable, yet there is in existence 
plain law and sense enough to deal with corporate abuses like the 
present — abuses which, if allowed to thrive and become general, 
must inevitably lead to the oppression of the people, and ultimately 
to the subversion of their political rights. The legal results of the 
abuses proven justly follow. They are forfeiture and dissolution." 
This decision will be appealed from, but the ablest lawyers believe it 
will be sustained. The Trusts will probably try to reorganize in such a 
way as to steer clear of the legal dangers indicated in Judge Barrett's 
decision. So long as there are Judges like Barrett on the Bench they 
wffl have a hard road to travel. 

The National Board of Trade is a body which, it must be con- 
fessed, is entitled to some consideration in regard to questions of 
finance. It has just memorialized Congress, through Senator Sher- 
man, to suspend the purchase of silver bullion and the coinage of the 
silver dollar. What has our local Board of Trade to say to that pro- 
posal? Do the members of the Chamber of Commerce approve it? 
It has hitherto been understood that the Pacific Coast had its own 
views in regard to the Silver question. We were all awfully shocked 
when Henry Watterson denied us a plank in the Democratic plat- 
form, and exclaimed: "Silver be d d." It begins to look as if 

that very thing may ha ppen to it. 

Mr. Labouchere declares that there are at present over a million 
girls in England unable to secure husbands, and suggests as a remedy 
that the girls should be allowed to propose; in fact, that the courting 
and proposing should henceforward be a business appertaining equally 
to both sexes. But then how is that likely to increase the number of 
marriageable men? The change may enable people to get bettd 
mated, but it has little to do with increasing the number of available 
mates. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 26, 1889. 




"■ — 7 ROSTS and showers in alternation have 

I been the climatic features of the week, 

: \ s and though the air has been sharp and 
chill during the early hours of the morn- 
ing, the afternoons have been beautiful, 
or, "distinctly Californian,'' as I heard an enthusiastic 
Bostonian describe them the other day. Socially it has been 
moderately gay, though large events have this month not been nu- 
merous. Dinners and home evenings have served to keep the ball 
rolling, and the machinery from growing rusty, so to speak. Sunday 
evening is again becoming a fashionable one to be at home to one's 
friends. It was always a favorite one with Mrs. Hall McAllister in 
tbe past, at whose house an excellent cup of tea was usually to be 
had after church. The Friedlanders, too, while living in Bryant 
street, adopted Sunday evening for their receptions, and they have 
lately resumed it again with some success. 

Teas have not been so prevalent a form of receiving one's friends 
this Winter as in other seasons, notably last Winter, when they were 
very numerous, scarcely a week passing without at least one being 
given. Mrs. Ned Hopkins' tea of last Saturday was the first large 
entertainment the lady has ever essayed, her taste hitherto inclining 
more towards dinner parties and lunches to her lady friends. Be- 
tween the hours of four and seven that afternoon, her pretty Queen 
Ann cottage on California street was the scene of a brilliant gather- 
ing. The sunlight was excluded and the rooms brightly lit with gas. 
gaily decorated with flowers, ferns and foliage, and filled with an 
ever-succeeding throng of guests, who having paid their compliments 
to their hostess, were regaled with tea and other refreshments 
iu the dining-room, while listening to some of Ballenberg's choicest 
selections. Mrs. Hopkins looked charmingly, and was very efficiently 
aided in her duties by a perfect bevy of fair maids and matrons, all 
most becomingly attired. The afternoon was an enjoyable one, and 
the evening ended with a dance for the young assistants in the labors 
of the day. 

Another tea was also given last week by Mrs. Greyson, in Oakland, 
which drew quite a number of her friends from this side of the bay. 
It might have almost been called a " triple alliance," for there were 
three sets of guests — the elderly, middle-aged and young — who all 
united in one harmonious whole when their first reception was ac- 
complished. The house, which is a large and handsome one, was 
most profusely dressed with tropical plants and blossoms in great 
variety, especially beautiful being the arrangement of ferns and 
palms in the dining-room, where an elaborate lunch was served. 
Musioal selections were played by a stringed orchestra during the 
reception, and the guests wandered around at will while listening to 
it, and enjoying with each other the chit-chat of the day. 

Ladies' night at the Olympic Club on Wednesday evening of this 
week filled the gymnasium to overflowing, the softer sex being 
largely in the majority. An excellent lecture on Olympian games 
was delivered in a very graceful manner by Mrs. Williams, and the 
concert which followed — chiefly of Irish airs — was a most pleasing 
one. 

Society is to be congratulated upon the fact that Mrs. Parrott has 
again joined the ranks of party-givers in San Francisco. She has 
taken possession of her lately purchased house on Sutter street, and 
on Thursday evening gave her first reception, which, though not a 
ball, was an eminently pleasant party. Mrs. Parrott was assisted in 
the care of her guests by her daughters, Mrs. Pay son and Mrs. 
Hayne, the only two of them who are at present in America, the 
others now all residing in Europe. 

A new social club made its initial appearance last evening, giving 
a domino party at L'nion Square Hall. . They style themselves the 
K. K. K. One K, supposedly, standing for each of the parties they 
intend giving. The next one will take place on Valentine's eve, when 
paper costumes will be in order; and during Easter week the final 
dance will be made a tancy-dress affair, and a fitting finale for what 
they wish to be a very jolly trio of entertainments. 

But though January has been in the main a quiet month in society 
circles, February promises to make amends in the number and variety 
of entertainments which are already announced to take place, to say 
nothing of those still in embryo. The month will open well with the 
cotillion of the Bachelor Club, at B'nai B'rith Hall, when Mr. Ed. 
Greenaway will resume his place as leader, which he has so cheerfully 
yielded at the last two club parties. Already the first week of the 
month has been pretty well appropriated. Madame Von Schroeder 
has taken the 5th, Mrs. Pixley the Oth, Mrs. H. B. Williams the 7th, 
the Olympic Club the 8th, when their eagerly anticipated fancy-dress 
ball will be given, and on tbe Oth the Page-Ralston nuptials will be 
celebrated in Oakland. The happy pair are, 1 hear, to reside in San 
Rafael, where the expectant groom ha3 already taken a cottage and 
is busily preparing a cosey home for his beautiful bride. 

Two ladies are setting a good example to those who would like to 
give parties, but owing to small houses and circumscribed space, are 



deterred by the fear of overcrowding their rooms and thus rendering 
their guests uncomfortable. I allude to the projected entertainments 
of Baroness Von Schroeder and Miss Emily Hager, which are named 
to take place, one at Odd Fellows' Hall, on the evening of the 5th of 
February, and the other at Pioneer Hall, on the evening of the 14th. 
The latter is, I hear, to be a Valentine party, and Mrs. Hager, who is 
nothing if not original in her ideas, promises, it is said, that the 
many novelties which are in preparation for that night, will make the 
evening one oE pure and unalloyed delight to all. 

It is hinted that Miss Hatch has become engaged to Eddie McAfee, 
of Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Bank. 

Afternoon concerts are becoming very numerous. For some good 
reason evening concerts are for the present not popular— indeed I do 
not think they ever have been to the majority of men, and ladies 
therefore often find it difficult to obtain willing escorts. To an after- 
noon concert two or more ladies can go together. Nay, if forced to 
do so, a lady can with perfect propriety even go to one by herself. 
So concert-givers have wisely taken the fact into consideration, and in 
consequence tbe number of musical matinees are rapidly increasing. 
Several have been given with success this week, and there are more 
on the cards for the future. 

Mrs. Otis's many friends are glad that she has reconsidered her in- 
tention of spending the Winter at the East, and with her daughter 
still remains among us. To be sure, not being in her own house, she 
is not able to extend tbe hospitalities of former years to her acquaint- 
ances, but she is of very material assistance in making the Wednes- 
day evening dances at the Occidental (which is her headquarters) the 
very pleasant gatherings they undoubtedly are. 

Mrs. Haggin's dinner last week was given as a good-bye to her 
niece, Mrs. Sharon, who has returned to her home in New York. 

Mrs. Newlands has departed for Carson, there to join her husband, 
where they will spend the rest of the Winter. I have been rather 
amused when hearing people talk of the magnificence of their abode 
in Nevada, as she herself told me it was but a small three-roomed 
cottage, something very far removed from the Chateau en Espagne 
their imaginative friends so kindly place them in. 

Several defections have taken place in the ranks of our society 
beaux tbis past week, notably Mr. Hugh Tevis, who has returned to 
his cattle ranch down south, and Lieutenant Bean, who has gone 
East on a two months' leave, and both young gentlemen are already 
muchly missed and lamented. Compensation may be said to have 
come in the persons of Messrs. Eugene Dewey and Leonard Chen- 
ery, who, though beaux of a past decade, are held in warm remem- 
brance in San Francisco, and are always welcome when they pay 
their angels' visit. It will be but a short one— so they say— having 
devoted so much time to the southern part of the State. Mr. and 
Mrs. George Howard, nee Nettie Schmieden, are looked for next 
month. Tbey are, I believe, already en route home. Felix. 




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Jan. 26, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



SOME PET ANIMALS. 
"T" T has always seemed to me that there must be something lacking 
\ in the composition Of those who (Id DOt care for pets, who arc 

(J not oonmtoaa at ■ sympathy between themselves «nd the more ! 

X intelligent animals. Not to have had a fiiithful dog in ehitd- 
hooil. robs Childhood o! more than half its joy. Still, there is 
no accounting for tastes, and what would plena one patSOn could (ill 
another only with disgust. Boma there he '* that are mud if they he- 
hold a cat." a harmless, necessary cut, and others are almost hydro- 
idiohiiics, if I may so com a word, at the mere sight of a puppy; 
while a horned toad is the perfection of rcpulsiveness to .me who has 
an aversion for all creeping, crawling things. Nevertheless, homed j 
toads are a part of the stock of the dealer in pet animals, and bring 
from fifty cents to a dollar a piece. Nor are they without intelli- 
gence, for they know their owner' s voice, and seem to derive great 
satisfaction from crawling over his neck and hands. 

But the majority of those who gratify their longing for pets, do re- 
quire more intelligence than is manifested by the horned toad. To 
old maids are always assigned cats and kittens, though the fancy for 
felines is by no means confined to ladies who have chosen to live 
in a state of single blessedness. In this city there is a constant de- 
mand for Angora cats, which, as kittens, bring the modest sum of 
twenty-five dollars, and as grown cats fetch three times that amount. 
I talked for some time with a dealer in this style of live stock, and 
he said that it had been the hardest thing in the world to convince 
people that an Angora cat was not necesarily white. He also told 
me that the Angora cat was rather more treacherous than the or- 
dinary " grocery cat," being often inclined to scratch strangers so 
presumptious as to pat their long silky fur. The maltese cat has al- 
ways been a prime favorite, and if children are to have a cat for a 
playmate, which, by the way, is not without risk.it should by all 
means be a maltese, for generally speaking, such a tabby is mild, 
gentle, and willing to be fondled. 

Not a few San Franciscans care more for birds than for four footed 
pets. It may be that the birds can be hung up in a cage out of the 
way, while a cat, or a dog has a special faculty of getting under one's 
feet. Canaries bring a price ranging from three dollars to twenty, 
and the finest singers come from the Hart/, mountains in Germany, 
and are known as the St. Andrews bird. Of these, the best of 
all is the " Campanini " canary, named in honor of the great tenor. 
It is distinguished on account of having all rolling notes, in five dis- 
tinct tones. I asked the bird fancier if it was not possible to spoil the 
song of a canary by keeping it where it could hear the noises made 
by the rest of the animals in the store. *' Oh, yes," replied he, " we 
have to be very careful; otherwise a good bird would pick up bad 
notes." 

A great many parrots are sold here every year, among our foreign 
population. The finest of all is the African grey parrot, which is 
sold at prices ranging from twenty-five dollars to five hundred, the 
amount depending entirely upon polly's accomplishments. This 
bird is the finest talker of all, and whistles and picks up songs with 
great skill. The Mexican parrot costs anywhere from ten to fifty 
dollars, and is a very pretty bird, with a double yellow head, but per- 
haps not one in twenty will learn to talk. The only reliable bird, so 
the dealer assured me, is the South American or Panama parrot, for 
out of a hundred there is not one that will not learn to talk. Some 
people have a fancy for the cockatoos, but although it is a beautiful 
bird it cannot do much else than scream, but it is proficient in the 
art of making a noise. The different varieties are, the lead-beater, 
without a crest, the Maggie Mitchell, a handsome bird, white, streaked 
with red. and adorned with a ruff around the top of the head, red. 
with yellow tips. The Napoleon is also a fine bird, white, with red 
streaks and a red crest. This cockatoo is often a fine talker. Both 
parrots and cockatoos are brought to port in either boxes or in bar- 
rels filled with perches, upon which the feathered emigrants keep 
their place. 

The price of mocking-birds has fallen off from the seventy-five or a 
hundred dollars of four years ago, to the five or twenty-five of the 
present day. The finest specimens of this bird are from the Southern 
States, although there is a fine mocking-bird found in Los Angeles. 
As their name implies, they closely imitate sounds, and they can 
talk and whistle regular tunes. The thieving magpie has a passion 
for appropriating whatever is bright and shining. He also can whis- 
tle and talk, and is apt to become very tame indeed, playfully rolling 
on his back and kicking his legs in the air as if in derision of any at- 
tempt to pick him up. He brings the modest price of a hundred dol- 
lars, or he may be bought for twenty-five. Nearly all old Califor- 
nians remember the bird store on Washington street and its tame 
magpie, which used to roam the street at will, always returning at 
its master's call. "Mag, I'm going to breakfast," would bring the 
bird hopping bach in a moment. But one day poor Mag met his fate 
by being run over by the wheels of a great trunk, and crushed to 
death. The entire neighborhood mourned for his untimely taking 
off. California magpies are steadily growing into favor. 

"Aviary birds" are in great demand, and always attract more or less 
attention from those who pause to look into a bird-fancier's window. 
They look " so sweet " and so cunning that it seems almost a slan- 
der to say that most of them for the size are fearfully bloodthirsty. 
There are the little strawberry birds, from Japan; they sing a soft, 
low song something like that of a canary. More than a pair in a cage 
are apt to come to grief. The " love bird," or shell parroquet, from 



Australia, is very pretty ; their African cousins, which nre all green, I 
with a red patch around the head, arc runuibitls, mid .-at asoh other 
with great gusto. They peck each other in the eye. eat up that Optio, 
and then finish off with the head. The dealer told me that frequently 
of a morning he has found several headless bodies upon the floor of 
the cage. These interesting little cannibals cost five dollars a pair. 
At present there is a scarcity of lovebirds. German and French ves- 
sels have been cruising around and buying up the supply to take 
them to France. One dealer had ordered a thousand to be delivered 
by the steamer Alanda, and not one arrived. Then ihere are the Java 
sparrows; the blue ones are three and a half a pair, and the white 
ones four dollars a pair. They are very easily tamed, and they are the 
birds by which the itinerant Italian fortune tellers pick out the cards. 
A gambling game is now being worked here by the same means. 
They are belligerant little fellows, and think nothing of catching each 
other by the bill and swinging an opponent back and forth with many 
a vigorous twist from the perch, until his hapless head is literally 
wrung off. The diamond sparrows, from Australia, are also great 
fighters. They are four dollars a pair. The "sociable birds'* are 
those little mites who cuddle so close to each other that twenty-five 
would crowd into a tiny nest not six inches in diameter. 

Other aviary birds are the plum-head, the black-hooded nun, the 
satin finch and the zebra finch. Nearly all these little fellows are a 
dollar apiece. 

Gold fish are still popular, though they do not bring half what 
they once did. The finest now are only twenty-five cents apiece. 
Among not a few there is a superstition that a gold fish brings bad 
luck. The proprietor of the fountain declared that his gold fish " Jo- 
nahed " him. It all seems to depend upon luck whether or not gold 
fish are to be long-lived. The dealer declaimed any knowledge of how 
to prolong their brief existence. 

Strange as it may seem, there is a steady demand for pet monkeys 
in our city. The favorite varieties are the Singapore or China mon- 
keys, which bring from ten dollars to seventy-five each, and white- 
faced, ring-tailed monkey, from the Isthmus. The latter is very in- 
telligent, and not quite so malicious as some other Simians. These 
are both small monkeys, and do not weigh more than ten pounds. 

Pi Vernon. 

At 213. 
Thr Original Swain has original ways 

At his bakery on Sutter street, 
Of directing the people's attention and gaze 

To his deservedly famous retreat, 
Where all will find that it really pays 

To buy their cakes and all that is sweet. 

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AT $1.00 LADIES' 6-BUTTON "FRANCOZ" DOGSKIN, embroidered backs 



111, 113, 118, 117, 119, 121 POoT STKt-iiT. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 26, 1889. 



SPARKS. 
"" 7VEN now there are those who doubt Darwin's doctrine of 
J evolution. They shut their eyes to the strides humanity is 
^3 making towards godlike perfection; but evolution is at work 

J all the same, and nowhere is this more conspicuous than in 

the perfecting development of the law-making type of our 
race. Solon was the Athenian ideal of a law-maker about 635 B. C. 
Lycurgus was the model legislator of the Spartans about 996 B. C. 
Comparatively speaking, how brief the period and how stupendous 
the advance! Only 2,885 years from Lycurgus to Goucher of Mari- 
posa. Only 2,527 years from Solon to Paddy Murphy of San Fran- 
cisco! And compare if ye dare, oh ye doubters, any act of Solon or 
Lycurgus with the conscientious wisdom displayed by the Democratic 
caucus at Sacramento last week. Our State has made a princely en- 
dowment for the acquisition and maintenance of a library which 
shall be a worthy monument to the enterprise, the intelligence, the 
taste and the culture of her people. The better class of Californians 
take great pride in their State Library, and desire that it shall be kept 
abreast of the best institutions of the kind the world over. It is es- 
sential to this end that it be in charge of a librarian who has some 
literary taste and knowledge. It is the duty of the Legislature to 
make periodical choioe of rive directors of the State Library, and it is 
one of the duties of these directors to appoint a librarian. 

* * * * » 

Last week the Democratic legislators met in caucus to decide 
whom they would support for Directors, and chose five persons, who 
were pledged — and simply because they were pledged— to support 
for Librarian Mr. Dana Perkins of Rocklin. Now, Mr. Perkins 
is in no way a man of literary, tastes or habits; he neither knows nor 
cares anything about books, unless it be such as are made on the turf 
or in poolrooms, and will be about as much out of place in the sur- 
roundings of a library as would be a bull in a china shop. Jle can- 
not, without consulting authorities, name the authors of " The Tem- 
pest," or " Cosmos," or " Novum Organum" or the Pentateuch. As 
a director of the State Fair he was quitein place; for. State Librarian 
he is as unfit as for the leadership of Methodist prayer meetings. 
Solon or Lycurgus would not have placed Mr. Perkins in charge of 
the libraries of Sparta or Athens. But — evolution— the happy-go- 
lucky still canters down the centuries, and the fittest keeps on sur- 
viving. Voila, Dana Perkins! from the Delphian the Bush-street 
oracle evolves. The environment does the rest. We are the envi- 
ronment, God pity and God help us. 

* * * * * * 

It was a cruel turn that was recently served on the frisky middle- 
aged matrons— the matrons who are fair, fat and fast approaching 
forty, but who can't or won't appreciate the fact that they must 
yield their places to younger favorites. The band of pilgrims, known 
as the floor managers of the cotillion club, were cold blooded enough 
at the first of this Winter's parties to enforce the rule of the club 
that all ladies not participating actively in the german must sit up- 
stairs in the gallery, and there remain until the announcement of 
supper. The blow was not softened by any previous warning, and 
the fair covey of birds, with shining, shivering backs and arms, were 
hustled up-stairs with scant ceremony, and left to freeze and sulk 
during three mortal hours. These hours were probably the longest 
knowu to their frivolous lives. It is not a particularly joyous or en- 
livening occupation to dwell apart for this space of time watching the 
love-making, flirtation and dancing of other women when one is all 
burnt up with desire to join in those delights and have a share in the 
spoils. It is not calculated to soothe wounded vanity to be publicly 
reminded that youth's sun has set, and that one's reign of triumph- 
ant belledom is over. Neither is it agreeable to sit half nude and 
motionless with the thermometer at sixty. In fact, there are so 
many unpleasant features connected with being made a wall-flower, 
nolens volens, that many of the subscribers of this swagger club have 
been conspicuous by their absence from subsequent entertainments. 
Tbis contingent content themselves now by giving little dinners that 
are laved in high wines, and whose piece de resistance is the more or 
less decollete corsage of the hostess. Let no one believe for an in- 
stant that the unmarried are admitted to these delightfully risky 
little dinners and suppers, to which I shall have occasion to refer in 

another article in the near future. 

******* 

Who says we are not metropolitan? The Directoire cane made its 
appearance on Kearny street the other afternoon in charge of a young 
lady who had gathered on her person every known fad of the hour. 
Her gown was pale reed-green enormously plastroned with black moir6 
and dotted with the ubiquitous Directoire buttons. Her head-gear was 
a black Gainsborough hat twined with a long fur boa, and swathed 
in the inevitable Hading veil, and close fitting tan suede gaiters and 
gloves were the accessories of the toilette. But the crowning touch 
was that cane! It wavered and wobbled, and danced from side to 
side, it kept time to the young lady's steps and emphasized them in 
the same way as does a rope-walker's balancing stick. It soared 
aloft long, lean, lank, its big silver knob on a level with the owner's 
eyes, and the knot of ribbons tied about the handle fluttered in the 
breeze like the pennants from a spanking yacht. Its manipulations 
were watched by a breathless crowd, and if it had been dropped any- 
where from Bush street to the Baldwin, twenty masculine hands 
would have struggled to return it to the owner. "It was the first 
that ever burst " on the astonished gaze of San Francisco, though 



probably when the Spring-time comes the bloom of novelty will be 
rubbed off and its appearance will create no sensation. But, mesdames, 
it is an unlovely and unladylike fashion, and like the irritating Had- 
ing veil, its place is not on the public promenade. 

***** 

An engagement in high life, announced just before the holidays, 
saved the purse if not the heart of a noted married belle who resides 
most of the year in the vicinity of Sah Mateo. Not even a Page of 
poetry was sent to the gentleman for whom she has cherished sup- 
posedly the same kind of affection as was manifested by Potiphar's 
wife for the virtuous Joseph. It was undoubtedly shabby of him to 
dispose of his life and affections without consulting the married lady, 
but young men of his age, like Republics, are ever renowned for 
their ingratitude. Meanwhile society looks on with lazy amusement 

and wonders how long it will be before he returns to his muttons. 

***** 

Mr. Crocker has drawn the matrimonial prize of the year, and is 

the subject of heartiest congratulations on all sides. Miss Ives is 

one of those exceptionally fortunate mortals on whom the gods seem 

to have lavished all their most precious gifts— youth, health, beauty 

and wealth. She is, besides, accomplished, charming and sensible. 

She was the adopted daughter of Mrs. Charles McLaughlin, who, at 

her death, left the young lady an heiress to property of the value of 

half a million. Of course she is much too good for the prospective 

groom— most women are too good for the men they elect to marry— 

and in this case there are excellent reasons to wonder at her choice. 

I have not heard that any one thinks she is to be congratulated on 

her selection. 

* * * * » 

To the reflective mind of a curious looker-on of our fashionable 
world, what a field for thought is therein presented in the several 
peculiar features which obtain in our social system. One of the most 
striking is the number of young ladies who shine as stars in the 
firmament of " society," of whose parental surroundings or belong- 
ings said society is either absolutely ignorant or oblivious. Fathers 
or mothers have they all (or at least are supposed to have), but not 
one of the fashionable clique could tell you who or where they are, the 
chances being nine to ten they have never seen them. Some of these 
girls appear as "nieces" — convenient name, to an old bachelor or child- 
less couple. Some as proteges of rich friends; but the great majority 
of these ballroom belles are known chiefly as possessors of a pretty 
face or figure, a good step in the waltz, or as having plenty of " go." 
One type of the species is the girl who is always ready to fill a gap- 
willing to come at half an hour's notice; make a necessary fourth in 
a partie carree, or an indispensable third for a theatre trip; an oblig- 
ing creature ever on hand when called upon for the useful or orna- 
mental, as occasion requires. In return her name appears among 
the list of fashionable guests at cotillions, teas, receptions and balls. 
" Who is her father? " "Oh, old so-and-so." That fills the blank, 
and no more is asked. As a club man very pertinently remarked not 
long since, " It is highly indiscreet, nay, dangerous, to go to bedrock 
in the strata of the ' swim;' take the surface ore, my dear fellow, as 
you find it; let the old people rest in their native obscurity;" and 
so it goes. ■ 



"I want to see Carleton." " What Carleton?" 
W. T., the singer." " Well, go to the Maison Riche. 
to have good eating aud have a swell suite." 



"Why, the Carleton — 
He knew where to go 



JJo£t&(hMpo[J 

Pacific Coast Agents : 

Sherwood & Sherwood, 

212-214 Market Street, 

[Dec. 8. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Jan. 26, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE NEW WARFARE OF THE NEW WORLD. 
The world to-day. »» oorapared with that of one hundred yean 
in hoi a oew world. The nineteenth century baa seen the 
conditions of life on thin planet substantial]; made tie novo. The 
work of Watt had >-> for advanced at file end of the eighteenth cen- 
tury that the two great new forces wore nearly ready to he brought 
to light— eteam applied to the propulsion off machinery and steam 
applied to transportation. These forces have revolutionized the 
world, and this new world has Its new wars.' Individuals may still 
assault each other as Cain fell upon Abel, but nations have changed 
relati.iMs and changed conflicts. The old wars ended with Waterloo. 
As Napoleon rode away from the held of battle and disappeared into 
oblivion, he carried his era with him, as the new order was fast ap- 
proaching. For the movement of machinery the engine had been 
substantially perfected; for the movement of ships, a practicable 
form was almost ready, and a year before this epochal battle George 
Su-phenson had run his first locomotive at the rate of six miles an 
hour. Great as were the changes which then impended in the meth- 
ods of campaigns and battles— in the form of weapons, the move 
uient and feeding of armies, the shape and strength of ships— these 
were trifling when compared with the new relations which the na- 
tions of the earth were to bear to one another, and the new ways in 
which they were to struggle for supremacy. 

As the great Corsican reflected gloomily on the Prussians, whose 
coming upon the field had undone him, even his bold mind could not 
have conceived such a terrific campaign as that in which half a cen- 
tury later the same peoples were to stain nearly the same soil, so 
great was to be the change in all the conditions of movement and en- 
counter; yet had it been possible for him to anticipate this, his judg- 
ment would in all probability have recoued from the bare suggestion 
of the revolution which would take place in the intercourse of peoples, 
the producing power of mankind, the number and character of articles 
which would be necessary to civilized life, the transfer of commodities 
over the face of the globe, and the action and reaction of antipodal 
nations. Watt had released a genie, but its vast size and prodigious 
power could not be foreseen in 1815. Let us consider how nations 
fought at the beginning of this century, and how they may and do 
fight now. The struggle in the wars of that era was that of Hannibal 
or Alexander. Had Napoleon crossed to England he would have 
sailed as Cresar did. The attack of nation upon nation was that of 
the sword, and their effort to master each other was but the exertion 
of brute strength and primitive cunning. But in the life of the world 
under the new conditions of steam-power, new forces and new influ- 
ences have been given birth to. 

For instance, if the ryot's wheat from the interior of India can be 
brought to the seaboard and made into bread in London, in this way 
a blow is struck at the men who are sowing and harvesting in California 
or Minnesota, etc., as certainly as if they had been fallen upon with 
sword and gun ; or if, by a depression of wages in the manufacturing 
districts of England and Belgium, the products of ill-clad and poorly- 
fed men and women can be put into the markets of America, condi- 
tions can be dominated here as effectively as if the Union Jack were 
flying from the Capitol at Washington. England has Japan by the 
throat, and yet she has no army of occupation there. She has re- 
duced the population of Ireland to about one-half in forty years, yet 
only a small fraction of those destroyed did she actually put to the 
sword. She has held Ireland in the grasp of an economic vise, and 
has driven half its people into exile by influences whose power the 
steam-engine has increased a hundredfold. It maybe too much to 
expect that the old wars are entirely over. Men may fall upon each 
other as they did at Waterloo, but in the place of conflict of arms 
there are other kinds of warfare reaching around the world affecting 
the whole life of nations, laying under tribute lands upon which a 
hostile flag has not been seen, and making desolate cities that have 
not perceived an armed enemy. The forces employed are unlimited, 
and their power scarcely finite, yet they may not fire a gun. Such 
are really the new wars of the new world as it exists to-day. 



A dispatch to the London Telegraph says that frivolous Parisians 
are talking a great deal just now of a dramatic scene which was en- 
acted in a studio recently. Some days ago a dainty and capricious 
member of the fashionable monde took it into her head to have her 
portrait drawn by a painter. She went to the studio of a well-known 
artist in the neighborhood of breezy Montmartre, and for a long time 
debated whether she should pose like Mine. Recamier, the Fornarina, 
Diana of Poitiers or Susannah among the Elders. Rumor says that 
she elected to sit as Susannah, and when her portrait was finished a 
giddy and gossip-loving friend of her husband saw it in the studio. 
When the person met the lord and master of the lovely original he 
complimented him on the success of the portrait. The husband, 
however, was completely dazed, for he was not in his wife's secret. 
So he repaired with indignation to the studio, asked to see the por- 
trait, ripped it through and through with his sword stick, and then 
struck the unlucky painter several back-handers in the face. The 
artist has taken out a summons against his assailant, and the de- 
noument of this rather sensational affair is eagerly awaited. 

If you have carpets that need to be beat, 
Send to the 8. F. Carpet Beaters, 23 Tenth street. 
S. Ferguson's work is prompt and neat. 



Messrs. Deutz & Geldermann's 

GRAND VIN d'AY 




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In Magnums, Quarts and Pints, 

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■ For Sale in bond or duty paid by 

Charles Meinecke & Co., 

Sole Ag-enta Pacific Coast, 

ARMAND CAILLEAU, 

Leading Cloak and Suit House 

OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

48 GEARY STREET, - _-_ - Corner Grant Avenue. 

Mr. Cailleati is now exhibiting the finest of European goods and of the 
latest patterns, selected by himself while abroad. 

ULSTERS, WRAPS, JACKETS, 

TEA GOWNS, ETC. 

8EALETTE BY THE YARD, THE CHEAPEST IN THE CITY. 

- Special care given to country customers. [Sept. 29. 



HAND-MADE SHOES, $8.00. 




FROM THOMAS', LONDON, 

15 New Montgomery St., 



Under Grand Hotel. 



TO 

O-. -W. CLABK <Sc CO.. 
653 Market Street, 

FOE 

WALL PAPER, 

•WINDOW SHADES, 

And CORNICE POLES. 

O. A. LUNT, 

TE R PS I C H O R E A N ARTISTE, 

Academy, 1310 Polk, near Bush Street, San Francisco. 

Classes as Follows: 

Monday . Berkeley and San Francisco I Thursday San Francisco 

Tuesday Alameda Friday. Oakland and San Francisco 

Wednesday San Francisco | Saturday .. _... . . . San Francisco 

The Laboher & Moe Schools 
op 

LANGUAGES, 

70 Flood Building, San Francisco. Hamilton Hall, Oakland. 

Edward Larcher, Theodore M. Moe, Principals. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Navajo Mining Company, 

San Francisco, January 18, 1889. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the above-named Company, 
held this day, a dividend (No. 14) of Ten (10) Cents per share was declared, 
payable on FRIDAY, February 1, 1889. Transfer books closed on January 
24, 1889, at 3 o'clock P. M. 

J. W. PEW, Secretary. 
Office— No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. [Jan. 26, 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 26, 1889. 



MY GUIDE. 
^T" N the summer of 1869 I had occasion to visit the Rushmoor Asy- 
l luni for the Insane. The institution is, I believe, reckoned 
c) among the best of its kind in this country. The distinguishing 
X feature in its system of treatmenfcisthat of according to patients 
all reasonable freedom— a system, I am informed, which has 
been followed with the most encouraging results. So far as practi- 
cable, the inmates of the asylum are treated like sane men and women ; 
and, instead of being constantly reminded of their infirmity, they are 
led to forget it, if the power to "forget it renituns. 

On the day of my visit I had purchased a case of medicines for one 
of the assistant physicians, who was an intimate friend. This I had 
done at his request, and it was to deliver these medicines that I made 
the journey to Rushmoor asylum. 

Ascending the massive stone steps, I was conducted by one of the 
attendants into the reception parlor. Here I was left to wait until 
my presence could be announced to my friend, Dr. Balcom. It so 
happened that I was the only occupant of the room, and to engage 
ray mind while I waited I picked up a copy of De Quincy's "Confess- 
ions" and began to read. While thus occupied, a voice accosted me 
saying, "Did you wish to see any one, sir?" 

Looking up, I saw the speaker was a small, neatly dressed man, 
who had entered unobserved, and who bad evidently addressed me 
in order to make his presence known. 
" I was waiting," I replied, '* to see Dr. Balcom." 
" The doctor is engaged just at present on a very important case. 
Would you like to make a tour of the building?" 

I answered that I should be pleased to do so, and thereupon my 
friend conducted me out into the hall. I discovered that he was one 
of the attendants in the asylum, and he also informed me that be 
studied insanity for a number of years, with a view of htting himself 
for a physician. 

Under so excellent a guide I was conducted through the building, 
and shown the numerous points of interest. Those patients whose 
cases possessed particular interest were also pointed out to me, and 
their idiosyncrasies fully explained. 

" The man whom we just passed," said my companion, referring to 
a large, fresh faced, mild eyed patient, '■ is one of the most danger- 
ous patients we ever had." 

'• Indeed!' I replied; "one would not think so from looking at 
him." 

" No; but the appearance of all insane people is deceptive. There 
was a woman here some time ago— a pale, sweet-faced, delicate crea- 
ture — whom we all thought a saint, and who acted as one until she 
succeeded in getting hold of a carving knife, and then she cut the 
throats of two of her fellow patients." 

" Is there not danger," I asked, " in granting so much liberty to 
the inmates? " 

" Well, it is our peculiar system. We find in some instances, of 
course, that the freedom is abused, but in the majority of cases it 
works well. " 

This and much more conversation took place between the attend- 
ant and myself as we passed through the halls. I was most favor- 
ably impresed with his intelligence and manners, and the thought 
struck me that he was fitted to fill a higher position than that 
which he occupied. 

" I observe," he said, " that you carry a medicine case, and I infer 
that you are a physician." 

"No," I rejoined; " although I have the equipments of a doctor, 1 
should make but sorry work at using them. They belong to Dr. 
Balcom, and I called to deliver them." Then, looking at ray watch, 
I added, " I fear that I am keeping the doctor waiting by my long ab- 
seuce." 

" I think he is not yet disengaged," returned my companion; "we 
shall have time to go out on the roof of the building, from which the 
views are really magnificent." 

Accordingly my guide led the way up the spiral staircase, which 
connected the topmost story with the roof, I following at his heels. 
As we emerged through the broad skjdight the scene which present- 
ed itself to the eye was really magnificent. To the right lay the 
river, winding like a silver thread through the pleasant valley; in 
front could be seen the distant spires of the city, glistening like the 
sunlight ; and afar off rose the hills, their summits lost in the blue of 
the heavens. The carefully kept grounds of the asylum, immedi- 
ately beneath us, looked like a map, gorgeous with its many hues of 
flowers. 
" This is certainly a splendid view," I said. 

" It is still better from the opposite side of the building," returned 
my guide. "Let us go over there." 

Accordingly we walked along the flat roof, the attendant taking 
the precaution to close the skylight behind us, lest any of the pa- 
tients should be tempted to follow us. The Rushmoor asylum is 
some two hundred and fifty feet in length, and as we emerged from 
the westerly end of the roof we had this considerable distance to 
walk. 

Suddenly, when we had reached a point midway in the building, 
my companion stopped, and, turning upon me abruptly, said, "Have 
you a large brain?" 

I looked at him a little wonderingly, and then laughed as I replied: 
' ' Well, if 1 have, the world has not discovered it. " 



" Don't jest, sir," he said, petulantly, and with a seriousness that 
flashed an unpleasant suspicion across my mind. " I wish to know 
distinctly, whether or not you have a large brain?" 

He was looking me full in the face with a peculiar expression in his 
dark eyes which I had not before observed. There was not the slight- 
est betrayal of levity in his manner. He was terribly in earnest. 
His thin white fingers worked couvulsively, and there was a twitch- 
ing about the muscles of the mouth, such as I have seen in persons 
suffering intense pain. The horrible truth flashed upon me as I re- 
turned his steadfast gaze. This man was a maniac. 1 am possessed, 
I fancy, with an average amount of courage, but at that moment I 
felt it oozing out of the very pores of my skin. I know that I turned 
deathly pale, and for a moment was utterly unable to think. Then I 
grew calmer. Doubtless this maniac had brought me on the roof of 
the building with the idea of pushing me off. As I have already 
said, he was a small man. Physically I was his superior. But I was 
without weapon of defense. Suppose that he was armed ! 

" My good sir," I said, endeavoring to speak in a natural tone, " I 
can assure you that my brain is not a large one, and as my time is 
limited, I think we had better go down now." 

I made a movement as if to retrace my steps to the skylight. 
Quick as thought the madman sprang in front of me, and, with his 
eyes glaring wildly, albeit he spoke in a low, unexcited voice, he said: 
" I think your brain is large enough for my purpose, sir. You 
must understand that I have a great mission in this world to fulfill — 
a mission which 1 have not as yet begun. The strain upon my own 
mental faculties will be too great. I therefore intend to take your 
brain and insert it in my own head." 

Here he drew from the breast pocket of his coat a large sized clasp 
dagger, which he opened, and began to run the blade up and down 
the palm of his hand. 

" I have given years of thought to this subject," he continued, 
" and I am convinced that I shall succeed. With a double brain 
power, I shall be enabled to accomplish a double amount of brain 
work. I have been waiting a long time for a subject, but not until 
I saw you did I find one suited to my purpose. You are the man— 
the brain for which I have been watching," 

" I fear, sir," I said, " that you are sadly mistaken. Your idea is 
a grand one— an original one. But I am not fit to aid you in carry- 
ing it out. You should select a strong, active, healthy brain. Mine, 
on the contrary, is weak and diseased. Why, sir, up to the age of 14 
I was considered an idiot. Since then my friends do not permit me 
to have control of my own affairs. I am actually little better than 

a lunatic. I can neither read nor write, I " 

" Nevertheless, " he interrupted, " you will answer ray purpose, 
and I am about to take out your brain with this dagger, and insert 
it in my own head. 1 have brought you out here on the roof that 
we may be free from interruptions. You will oblige me by now ly- 
ing down. 

If my mind had been stunned by the first discovery of the man's 
madness it was active enough now. A thousand schemes rushed 
through my mind; I took in the situation fully. I was alone with 
a maniac armed with an ugly weapon, and he bent upon my de- 
struction. To cry out would be useless. Noboby could hear me. 
The chances of any aid from those within the asylum were small in- 
deed. I could not run away. If I attempted to gain the skylight I 
should certainly be killed. The medicine case in my hand suggested 
the thought which saved ray life. 

"If you are determined to make use of such an unworthy subject as 
I," I said, " well and good ; I shall offer no further resistance. But I 
ask that you will grant me five minutes while I address a brief fare- 
well to my friends. 1 will give it to you to deliver to them." 

" Very well," he replied, "if you know how to write, proceed. I 
will wait five minutes." 

He took up his position a foot from me, watching every movement 
I made with a horrible eagerness. I knelt down with my back 
toward him, took from the medicine case a bottle of chloroform 
(which I knew it contained) and saturated my handkerchief with the 
liquid. This I succeeded in doing without his knowledge. Then, 
rising to ray feet, I scribbled some unintelligible words upon the back 
of an envelope, and said : 
" You will do me the honor by reading what I have written here." 
He came toward me, and while I held the envelope in ray hand 
stood by my side and looked at the writing. I had the handkerchief 
in my right hand and the envelope in the left. As he bent forward to 
decipher the words 1 suddenly clutched his hand which held the dag- 
ger, and at the same instant clapped the handkerchief over his 
raouth and face. He struggled fiercely for a moment or two, and 
then the fumes of the drug began to tell upon him. His efforts to re 
lease himself grew weaker, and he finally fell to the floor insensible. 
With all haste 1 made ray way to the skylight, down the spiral 
staircase and into the halls below. There I recounted what had hap- 
pened, and two of the assistants were sent to bring down the murder- 
ous maniac. He recovered from the effects of the chloroform, and 
the last I heard of him he was looking for a subject to furnish him 
an extra brain. — Philip ffargrave, in Boston True Flag. 

If you would have good-fitting sarmems, go 
To the merchaut tailors, Litchfield & Co., 

At 1-2 Post street, 
Where military suits are all the go. 

They are so neat. 



Jan. 26, 188S». 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



!> 



EARLY 



•FRISCO REMINISCENCES.-XXVII. 
lu an old Tdcbb. 

K< i rwot baaabaU, tin' names of toma of the Bagtea apon their 
ftiiirt 1 remember quite well, others I bare forgotten. Those 
which come back torn* are M. B. Qelaton, catcher; J. Willock, 

1 pitcher; John M. Fisher ( the old reliable, ever ready, cvvr capa- 

ble in any pooltion, be il base ball or cricket), second base; T. 
J. Dixon, third base; T. 1». Carroll, short stop ; John L. Durkee(of 
" Bin 6"), left field, and so on. Both the Kerrigans, Ned and Johnny, 
wan mamben of the Eagle Club, bat what exact position they play* 
ed in matches I cannot recollect. Kuggles was the elub's scorer. 
• • • • « 

I don't suppose any two men in any State, city or town in the 
Union ever did BO much for bise ball in early days as John Fiahsr 
and John Dorkee. They took a real, a genuine interest in the game, 
and set an example in that respect. Like cricket, base ball was up- 
hill work in those days. Life bad yet too practical a side to it to en- 
courage any settled form of recreation. If a man wanted amusement 
be could always find it at a theatre, and as for exercise, why there 
was Frank Wheeler's gymnasium, on Battery street, and Binney's, 
00 the corner of Clay and Kearny, and the Olympic Club. Who was 
going to the trouble of learning a game? 

• « * • » 

However, Planer and Durkee, in more ways than one, kept the ball 
rolling, and had a practice or match on hand whenever they could 
One of the chief difficulties to contend with was a ground within easy 
reach of the city. The chief— the only, in fact — practice ground was 
the lot at South Park, next door to Commodore Watkins' house. 
The house next to the vacant lot was, however, not the Watkins' 
which was within one door of the corner, but an Englishman's, 
named Griffin, a man who owned an early-time warehouse. Here, 
on this lot, there was practice nearly every afternoon and all Satur- 
day. Just en pauani it may be of interest to note the number of 
prominent citizens who, from 1861 on, lived in South Park. Isaac 
Fliedtander, George Gordon, Charles De Ro, George C. Johnson 
(Norwegian Consul and father of " Bob "), Colonel de Russey, Greg- 
ory Yale, etc. 

***** 

The " Bra Quad " was a very early-day baseball club. It was 
organized soon after the Eagles, and was, as the name imports, com- 
posed entirely of printers. J. J. Ayers, of the Call, was President of 
the club, and there were many prominent printers of the day mem- 
bers of it. The only name I can remember is that of George H. 
Pettis, who was one of the founders of the Franklin Light Infantry, 
also a " topog " institution. 

****** 

During 1861 the Excelsior Club, made up chiefly of boys and young 
men, came into existence. The members of this club, among others 
whom I now forget, were Albert Sidney Johnstone, Jr., McClung 
Johnstone, Hampton Huttun, George W. Birdsall and T. Gamier 

Tracy. 

***** 

A prominent member of the Eagle Club at this time was Bob 
Grilletti, a fine, handsome young fellow, with a face like Lord Byron. 
He was considered an A 1 ball-tosser then. 

***** 

I will now step across the threshold of the seventies, and " go into 
society again, leaving the consideration of any other general topic 
that may suggest itself as appropriate to these reminiscences to fu- 
ture supplemental contributions. 

***** 

The first recollection which comes to my mind with the opening 
year of the new decade is the Franco German war, and the excite- 
ment it created among our French and German citizens. San Fran- 
ciscans as a whole were a good deal like the rest of the world, I 
guess, in one respect. We all thought at first that France was going 
to have a " walk over." The French soldier was the ideal of a hardy 
campaigner and a brilliant fighter. There was nothing he couldn't 
achieve. Our ideas in this respect had a decided Napoleonic tinge. 
We only thought of the French army as it was under Napoleon. We 
seemed to forget that one of the most necessary ingredients of its 
power was lacking, and had been for many years. That necessary 
ingredient was Napoleon himself. It didn't take long to undeceive 
the world. "The poor Germans!" on everybody's tongue soon 
changed to " The poor French ! " The " Marseillaise," as a popular 
air, quickly gave place to " Di Wacht am Rhein," and the gay tri- 
color was hauled down to make way for the more sombre but solid 
horizontal bars of black, white and red. Who will ever forget during 
all that summer the excitement round the bulletin boards? It was 
indeed remindful of the days when, some seven or eight years be- 
fore, "A Great Battle. Fighting Joe Hooker routes Stonewall Jack- 
son, and Captures 20.000 Rebels," or "Grant whips Lee again, and 
Takes half his Army Prisoners," used to stare one in the face from the 
bulletin board of the Bulletin's little red brick office which for so long 
choked up Merchant street. Of course the foregoing announcements 
are scarcely in accord with history. I merely give them to show the 
style of things. 

****** * 

I don't believe there was a man in Europe, Asia, Africa or Amer- 
ica, who took a more genuine and incessant interest in the campaign 
than did Horace Davis. I had occasion to be thrown a good deal in 



Ma company during that summer. That he Is one of the most agree- 
able companions, well rend, well informed, dear beaded and eloquent, 
with refined tastes, matured by study and travel, and conversational 

powers of which any man might be proud, cannot fail to be the opin- 
ion formed of him by all people of intelligence who huve bad (hcgood 
fortune to enjoy bis society. Hut if ever a man had a hobby, that 
man u;i Horace Davto, and the hobby waa a knowledge of the 

tion at the seat of the Franco* ierinan war, and to talk about It. I 
wish I had a golden twenty for every time 1 heard him say " Met/ " 
during that summer of 1870. Well, this is not exactly going into so- 
ciety, is it? 

***** 

Her Britannic Majesty's iron-clad Hag ship Zealous passed the 
summer in the harbor, anchored off Washington street wharf. Un- 
til the Franco-German war was over, and decided one way or the other, 
no one knew what might occur to involve others of the great powers 
in the strife. i>o England, with her usual caution and anxiety to be 
able to throw her favor with the winning side, etc., thought it a wise 
thing to keep the Zealous in touch of the Atlantic cable. The officers 
fairly reveled in the clover of 'Frisco society, instead of cruising up 
to Nanaiiuo or down to Payata under sail to save coal, and while ac- 
cepting hospitality on every hand, did their best to return, in a series 
of receptions on board, such as they had given on a previous visit. 
The officers, I remember, were Admiral Arthur Farquhar, Captain 
Hume, Lieutenants Eardley, Hickman, and Leitb, Paymaster Twee- 
die, and Secretary Williams, with midshipmen innumerable in mon- 
key jackets with sleeves grown too short, and trowsers with legs half 
way up to their knees. Home of those " middies " with whom many 
an otherwise wall fiower (or, rather, bulwark flower) was glad enough 
to dance, have since become foremost officers. One of them, Ingle- 
field, is first lieutenant of the Buke of Edinburgh's flagship, Alexan. 
dra, in the Mediterranean. 

* * * * * 

Indeed, so generous was the hospitality of the Admiral and his 
officers that the citizens of San Francisco ("society" citizens, of 
course) headed by Mayor Selby, decided to make them some marked 
return other than invitations to parties and balls and dinners, to 
which they were asked like every other guest. So a grand ball was 
got up under the auspices of a committee of leading gentlemen, and 
given at Pacific Hall adjoining the California Theatre. This was on 
the evening of September 13, 1870. This ball was one of the grandest 
ever given in San Francisco. There were two orchestras, one to play 
for dancing and the other to give selections between times. The elite 
of society were present, and all the officers came in full uniform. 
The Admiral marched in at the head of his officers, the band play- 
ing '"God Save the Queen." I remember a sort of army uniform 
evening dress which some officers of the U. S. army wore at this ball. 
It was a blue dress coat and vest with brass army buttons, and blue 
cloth trowsers with a gold cord down the seam. Colonel Andeuretd, 
of General Sherman's staff, and Major Rath bone wore this dress. I 
never saw it before or since. It was not otherwise than a becoming 
costume, but I shouldn't wonder if it was thought just a leetle too 
dudish by other officers who didn't think so much of their clothes. 
Colonel Mansfield (the general's son) used to go to parties, I remem- 
ber, in gray pantaloons and a blue dress coat and velvet collar. So- 
ciety men didn't seem to take to it at all, and the Colonel had a lone- 
ly look, like some queer fish or strange bird. I guess he liked it. 
****** 

During the summer General Sherman paid 'Frisco a visit, and had 
a big blow out (of course) given to him at Belmont by Ralston. A 
grand ball at the Lick House was also given in his honor by leading 
citizens. This ball was eminently respectable, but it wasn't " swell,' 
like the Zealous party was. It is hard to describe the difference. So- 
ciety people will know well enough whatl mean. But as many people 
who don't care to keep an fait of society and what it is and does, and 
who affect to look down on society generally as great nonsense, may 
read these lines. 1 will endeavor to explain, ft is this: Ahem— er— 
well— no— I'm blamed if I can write it down. Yet. hold on ! I think 
this will show my meaning: The difference between the two balls was 
about what there is between an ordinary theatre audience and an 
opera one with Patti. See? 

***** 

One of the most fashionable places of resort, if not the most fashion- 
able, in the city during the Fall of 1870, was the roller skating rink in 
one wing of the Mechanics' Pavilion on Union Square. I don't know 
what started the thing going, but certainly for months you couldn't 
do a more fashionable. " tonier " thing than skate on roller skates. 
It didn't matter if you broke an arm or a leg or gave yourself con- 
cussion of the brain and knocked out all your false teeth, you had to 
skate if you wanted to be fashionable. As early as ten and eleven 
o'clock in the morning you would see not only ladies, bnt gentlemen, 
going patiently through all the preliminary gyrations, generally end- 
ing with a thumping whack on the floor. The hour generally devoted to 
lunch was given up by business men to practice, and from 12 to 1 was 
a lively hour at the skating rink. If you wanted to find a stock- 
broker 'to order " 1,000 Cholar, buyer 30," or a lawyer to get a stipu- 
lation for more time to answer, you would have to look him up at 
the skating rink. On Saturdays the room was thronged, and on 
Saturday night it was like a Patti first night, except that instead of 
the audience "sitting round in tiers," most of the performers "sat 
round in tears " after falls and collisions. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 26, 1889. 




ANON, given on Friday evening of last week, was distin- 
guished in having W. T. Carleton in the character which he 
created in this country at the Casino in New York — that of 
the Marquis d'Aubigne. The writer of this had the pleasure 
of hearing him on several of the evenings of that season at 
the Casino, and observes no diminution of his powers, no faltering in 
his voice. It is substantially the same characterization— the same 
care, the same attention. He sang finely at the Baldwin on Friday 
evening, and was supported ably by the company, notably by Clara 
Lane as Nanon. and J. K. Murray as the Abbe. But it is scarcely 
fair to select even these two for special mention, as all were excellent. 
The opera will be given as the closing one of the engagement this 

evening. 

# * * * * 

The Mikado! What a performance! Will any one ever forget it who 
saw it? First nights are considered en regie, " as we say in the clas- 
sics," or " quite the proper caper " to jump down to a democratic 
expression, but closing nights afford much more amusement at 
times — either the closing night of a week or of an engagement. Mr. 
Carleton himself, on this occasion, was evidently bent on a Saturday- 
night racket, because, of all make-ups, his of the Mikado was the 
funniest. To parody a familiar expression, we might exclaim : "O 
flesh ! how wert thou mummified ! " The Mikado's face was a study 
in antique leather, " saturated with sin." No description would do it 
justice. And the manner in which he attempted to flirt with Pitii 
Sing would have called down upon his devoted head worse maledic- 
dictions from Mr. Gilbert than have been showered upon poor Clem- 
ent Scott lately anent the criticisms on The Yeoman of the Guard. It 
is to be hoped that Mr. Carleton got his hat on the next morning 
without trouble. Mr. Drew's Koko and Clara Lane's Yum-Yum 

were well-nigh faultless, and all were seen at their best. 

***** 

Erminie was given for the first three nights of this week, and given 

creditably, though not with the distinguished success of other operas. 

Ravennes is not in Mr. Carleton's line. Mr. Drew's Cadeaux and 

Clara Wisdom's Princess were the successes of the presentation, the 

latter being especially rich and unctuous. In the third act, Mr. 

Carleton sang " Rose Marie," which was applauded, and deservedly, 

to the echo. 

***** 

Before leaving the Baldwin we desire to call attention again to the 
benefit which has been tendered Dan McCullough, the popular treas- 
urer of the house, and which will take place on Sunday evening, the 
Carleton Opera Company remaining over one day to appear on the 
occasion. Those who appreciate polite attendance at a box-office 
window will not fail to respond en masse when the occasion is offered 
to show a money appreciation of those gentlemanly qualities that 

are always manifested at the window of the Baldwin box office. 
****** 

La Traviata is being given for the closing week of the Campobello 
grand opera season, that artist's singing of the solo after the depart- 
ure of Violetta being one of the most impressive, vocally, ever heard 
on the Tivoli stage. Ida Valerga sings also with much force and 

fire. The Beggar Student will be staged next week. 

« * * * * * 

Fanchoji, the Cricket, is the attraction at the Alcazar. This is a play 
that should die with Maggie Mitchell— if she ever does die. It was 
first played by her, and is associated with her indelibly. There was 
little natural life in the character of Fanchon as she played it, de- 
spite its great popularity ; and the task of introducing flesh-and-blood 
life into it by any one would always be £ thankless task. Kate May- 
hew is not succeeding, though possibly she is doing as well as any 
one could do who would be apt to attempt it. But the idea of seeing 
two such artists as L. R. Stockwell and Eihel Brandon as Didier and 
Madelon is too bad ! No more Fanchon, please. Kate Putnam opens 
on Monday in Erma, the Elf, supported by her own company. 
***** 

At last the Bijou is open again, and the little minstrel house 
which had such a season of fun a few weeks ago, and which faded 
with an uproarious farce of tallow candles, is furnishing legitimate 
fun again. Billy Emerson is the leading light — beg pardon, we mean 
dark— and the audiences do not seem able to get enough of him; 
though, seriously, his song of " Moriarity " would be a much more 
pronounced success if sung without burnt cork, and with a pro- 
nounced Irish -l mug." Leon is as funny as ever, and the specialties 

of the other people are clever. 

* * * * * 

Lizzie Richardson gave a " lyric and Shakespearian recital " at the 
Byron Mauzy Piano Rooms on Monday evening, and gave fair prom- 
ise for the future. She has learned the mechanical part of her art 
fairly well, and a little stage experience will give her success as a 



s oubrette. In other words, she has learned to act; now she must 
learn to feel, or at least to express feeling. Pretty as a Picture was 
the most successful effort of the evening, and she need not be 
ashamed of it at all. Her " Juliet " examples show she has been well 
taught and disciplined by her teacher Mrs. Melville-Snyder. While 
we can but compliment her in general terms on her versatility, in a 
conservative way, we yet feel constrained to suggest that a strict de- 
votion to one line would yield her more decided success. She is 
pretty and graceful, and a little experience practically on the stage 

will be of great immediate benefit. 

******* 

The Bush-Street Theater, entirely renovated and renewed, will re- 
open this evening, with Lydia Thompson and her company, also 
renovated and renewed — if we may use the expression — in the bur- 
lesque of Columbus. But one woman in ten thousand can success- 
fully please two successive generations in burlesque capera, and that 
woman is Lydia. Many of those who were bald-headed as infants 
when she began her career will doubtless be seen among the other 
bald-heads in the front rows this evening. And they will be ready 
to sing, " I like it, I do." 

***** 

The first Louise Pyk subscription concert will take place at Irving 

Hall, Friday evening, February 8th, when the following artists will 

appear: Louise Pyk, soprano; Mary E. Barnard, contralto; Alfred 

Wilkie, tenor; N. B. Ptetson, bass; Alice Bacon, pianist; J. H. 

Rosewald, violinist, and Ada E. Weigel, accompanist. The second 

concert will occur on February 19th. Madame Pyk has returned 

from Mexico recently, where her success in the capital was very 

decided. 

***** 

Mrs. V. Willard will give a lecture at Byron Mauzy's Piano Rooms, 

January 30th, on "The Beauties of Our Own Land — America, "in 

which she will speak of their nobility as contrasted with European 

nations. 

***** 

The recently organized San Francisco Vocal Quartette will give its 
first concert Tuesday afternoons, January 29th and February 12th, 
at 3:15 o'clock, at Irving Hall. The quartette, as now organized, 
consists of Louise Pyk, soprano; Mary E. Barnard. contralto; Alfred 
Wilkie, tenor; N. B. Ptetson, basso; Clark Reynolds, musical 
director. It is the intention of the quartette to have Us programmes 
generally made up of ballads, duetts, trios, quartettes, and so forth, 
and composed of such pleasing and taking melodies as the people 
generally will be interested in hearing. 

***** 

Helena Modjeska begins her engagement at the Baldwin, which in- 
augurates her Coast tour and probably her farewell, on Monday 
evening, when Shakespeare's marvelous creation of Cymbeline will be 
given with all the brilliance which the art of the actress, the support 
of a fine company, and the auxiliaries of the Baldwin will insure. 
Cijinbeline will be given during the entire week of six evenings and 
one matinee, and the series of presentations will constitute one of the 
principal dramatic events for several years. Mary Stuart, Adrienne 
Lecouvreur and Camille will be given the second week. 

***** 

Mr. Rosewald begins his second series of orchestral matinees under 
circumstances even more favorable than the first series. The under- 
taking deserves all the success it enjoys. 

McAlester & Jones, Real Estate Agents and Rent Collectors : Office 
422 Montgomery street. The best regulated office ia the city. Men of experi. 
eaee, having studied the wants of landlords and tenants for 28 years; reli- 
able, prompt aud responsible in the mauagemeut of real estate, renting, 
selling and collecting, and takiug full charge of property at lowest rates. 

' NEW BUSH-STREET THEATRE. "^ 

M. B. Leavitt Lessee aud Proprietor 

Mr. Leavitt takes pleasure in announcing that "The Bush," the most 
popular theatre in the city, has been entirely remodeled, decorated, etc., at 
an expenditure of $30,000, now presenting in its entirety the moat beautiful 
and comfortable theatre in the city, will Keopeu This (Saturday) Eveniu.-, 
January 2iitb, with the famous LYUIA THOMPSON and Her Own Grand 
Burlesque Company, the mot,t thoroughly equipped Burlesque Organization 
in America, in the latest successful satire, 

coXiTjn^sTjrs i 

New and Elaborate Scenery! jiiost Gorgeous Costumes! Novel Effects! 
55 — Selected Artists -55. 

New scale of Pkices — Orchestra and Dress Circle (reserved), ?1; Balcony 
(reserved), 75c; Balcouy (adinis=iou), 50c; New Gallery, 25c. 

Seats on sale at the Box Office. [Jan. 26. 

ALCAZAR THEATRE. 

Geo. Walleneod Sole Manager 

Every Evening This Week 'including Suudayl, Matinee Saturday. The 
Charming Soubrette, MISS KA 1 E MAYHEW, supported by L. K. Stockwell 
and the Alcazar Theatre Company, in a Brilliaut Produetiou of 

iF-A-isrciEioirir, tihiie cbicketi 

Evening Prices — 25, 50 aud 76c. 
Next-KATIE PUTNAM, in 

:e:r.:m:-a., t:fh::e zeitlif 1 ! uau.26. 



LOUISE PYK CONCERTS 



-A_T IDR^XZCnTO- HALL, 

FRIDAY EVENING, February 8th; TUESDAY EVENING, February 19th. 
Admission (including reserved seat), $1; three seats for each Concert, $5. 
Apply at Sherman &. Clay's Music Store, or by letter to W. B. Hewson, 
Pleasantoa Hotel. [Jan. 16. 



Jan. 36, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS MATTER. 



11 




fS^ ft 



i B irarnlng to the membera ol the California Athletic Club to 
ii.i\. nothing to do with tin- clique ol gamblers which is trying 
to get control of the o:ganimtiou came none t" ( > soon. The 
plana Cor the ring were well prepared and Laid, and being so 
gloeaed over as to escape tin- watchfulness «>i the average club 
member, nothing but our exposure oi the pint, which was taken up 
by the dailies, defeated the object in view. The rank and tile of the 
club are thoroughly aroused t>> tin- necessity of maintaining its repu- 
tation to a high standard, a fact which in connection with the build- 
ing project under consideration has led a number of gentlemen to put 
up some new candidates for positions on the Board of I'irectors. The 
regular ticket will consist oi Edward Fay, W. B. Vice, Charles L, 
Aaher and it. H. Lichtenslein, while the opposition ticket will have 
the names ol John D. Spreckels, Henry Mann. Robert Risdon and 
William 8. Bowne. No one who ha9 the least interest in the club's 
prosperity OUghl to hesitate an instant as to which ticket should be 
chosen. The ability of the regular ticket is gauged by the ability to 
pass drinks over a bar or loan money at two per cent, a month on 
diamonds and jewels. We arc sorry (•> see W. R. Vice associated 
with Fay Lichtenslein and Asher. for Vice has worked hard and con- 
scientiously for the club. Mcs>rs. Spreckels, Risdon, Mann and 
Bowne are known throughout the business community as able and 
energetic men, and their selection will contribute much to the 
strength and solidarity of the club. The election will be between the 
rough-and-tumble element on one side and the respectable element 
on the other, and on the choice depends the club's future prosperity. 
• «•*** 

If Messrs. Spreckels, Bowne, Mann and Risdon are elected, as they 
almost assuredly will be. it devolves upon them to make one reform 
which i.s being requested, and even demanded, in many quarters. 
The time has come when the California Athletic Club need not give 
such brutalizing prize-fights, which are cloaked over in name under 
the guise of " glove contests." A " glove contest " as ordinarily un- 
derstood and as interpreted at the California Athletic Club mean two 
very different things. The recent events in the gymnasium have 
smacked more of the goryness of a slaughter-house than of a glove 
contest. Candidly, and stripped of all foggy phraseology, the 
McAuIttfe-Jackson glove contest was a most disgustingly savage 
fight. The gloves were so small that, to all intents and purposes, the 
men might as well have used their bare fists. A man whose hand is 
protected by light gloves can safely strike a harder blow than if his 
knuckles are unprotected, and the skin of the man struck is less apt 
to be cut. This is the only difference discernible to the ordinary eye 
between a " bare-knuckle tight " and a " hard-glove contest," as in- 
terpreted by the California Club. There is a stringent law against 
prize-fighting in this State; there ought to be a law equally stringent 
against such exhibitions. 

****** 

The *' hard glove contest " between Jimmy Carroll and Sam Blake- 
lock is set for next Tuesday, Both men are in fine fix for the battle, 
and Carroll is naturally the favorite. This and the signing of articles 
by Young Mitchell and Sailor Brown for a contest about the middle 
of March are the only events stirring in the local pugilistic arena. 
Mitchell and Brown will meet at the Golden Gate Club's gymnasium , 
and the club will put up a purse of $1,500. 

***** 

"Fight! fight! They will fight; they won't fight; they can fight; 
they can't fight; they might fight ; they might not fight; they could, 
would, should, must (or could not, would not, should not, must not) 
fight. Fight! Fight!" Of all the diabolically invented twaddle 
about Kilrain and Sullivan, that which, is being telegraphed (?) out 
here by the yard and published in the Examiner and the Chronicle is 
the worst. There is a well-founded suspicion that all this rot costs 
each office the price of one man's time, some paper and pencils. 
Pugilistic gossip about these talking phenomenons is about as fresh 
as a " dull thud " at a hanging. It is time to quit. 

* * * * * 

We are favored at present by a visit of William O'Connor, Amer- 
ica's champion oarsman, who is preparing for an alleged race with 
Jake Gaudaur on Oakland Creek, and is also awaiting the departure 
of a steamer for the Colonies. We are asked to believe that this same 
O'Connor is the squarest, most upright man in the crooked sculling 
community. It may be so; but we are also compelled to say that 
this same William O'Connor is a fool, or takes us in California to be 
such, as he wants us to bite twice at substantially the same bait. 
When he first came here to row Peterson he was given a warm re- 
ception. He defeated Peterson, won our money, and when he de- 
parted he went with the best wishes of the sporting public. As soon 
as he was safely beyond the Rockies, he rewarded our hospitality by 
bestowing on us the title of " suckers." Well, we may be " suckers " 
of the first order, but we do not, as a rule, look for a departed guest 
to blackguard us as he did. He has now returned, and, strangely 
enough, he thinks that we overlook all such utterances as he is credr 
ited with. His estimation of Peterson has risen to such a degree 



that he thinks -'with practice Peterson might become a world- 
beater." O'Connor wants to show os what a g I man Petsi 

by having a match made between our champion and Lee, wl 

Qpany the champion to the Colonies. It inch a match li made, 
or II ai. bfainm i^ matched against Peterson, the object will be to 
bleed us again. Either Lee or Ha mm can defeat Peterson, ami thai 

is all there is to be -aid to Mich a prop,, itioii. And white Mr. Will- 
iam O'Connor is about it promoting sculling mutches, he might con- 
descend to i.-ii as something aboul that gate money affair which he 
and Jake Gaudaur have arranged for March 1st on Oakland < reek. 
it is commonly understood that this event, advertised as ror the 

Championship of the world, is to he nothing more or less than what 
the un regenerate call a " dizzy lake." Bland up, Mr. O'Connor, and 
explain. 

* * » * • 

The Olympic club has done a very sensible thing in engaging the 
lliiight-street grounds for its field day, to be given on Washington^ 

Birthday. The grounds are much more convenient to the city de- 
vours of out-door games than the Center street park, and u largely 
increased attendance may be looked for in consequence of the change. 
The programme, as arranged, includes a 100, 150, 220, Un, 880 and 
1,000 yard run, a mile and a hall walk, 120 yard hurdle race, pole 
vaulting, hammer throwing, shot putting and' the usual jumps. Two 
bicycle races will also be contested. The club is making active strides 
forward this winter, having many excellent entertainments to come. 
Its amateur boxing contest, which ended Saturday evening was such 
a success that there will be another given in the near future, with the 
weights fixed according to the standard rules, as we suggested. 
***** 
The Alameda Olympic Club will give an exhibition on Monday 
evening, the features of which will be be set-tos between Billy Akers 
and Joe Soto, and Billy Shannon and Paddy Smith. 

***** 

Freddy Gebhardt has purchased alot of valuable stock in the East, 
which will be the nucleus of his new breeding ranch in Lake county. 



NEW BALDWIN THEATRE. 

Haudsomest Theatre in America. Absolutely Safe. 
Lessee and Proprietor, Mr. al. Ha yman | Acting Manager, Alfred Bouvier 
Last Week. CARLETON OPERA COMPANY. Saturday Matinee, tie 
Popular and Charming 

ZEKiryL-IJtTIIE ! 
Saturday Evening, tbe Greatest Success, 

Sunday Next— Benefit of Dan. McCullough, 

Monday Evening Next, January 28th— MODJESKA, in a Beautiful Revival 
of Shakespeare's 

CYMBELHsTE I 

SECOND WEEK— Monday, Tuesday and Saturday Evenings—" MARY 
STUART;'* Weduesday aud Thursday Evenings— "ADRIENNE LECOUV 
REUR;" Friday Evening and Saturday Matinee— "CAMILLE." 

Seats now on sale. [Jan. 26. 



TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 



Kreling Bros Sole Proprietors and Managers 

Last Week of the Grand Opera Season. Reappearance of Signora Ida 
Valerga. Farewell Nights of Sig. Enrico Campobello, in a Magnificent Pro- 
duction of Verdi's Masterpiece, 

Xj^_ t:r,-a_a7":i:^t .a. i 

The cast includes our entire Star Opera Company. Augmented Chorus and 
Orchestra. 
Monday Evening, January 28th, 

TIHIIE ZBZEG-O-^IR, STUZDZEZCsTT I 
First Appearance of the-Emiueut Comedian, MR. MAX FXGMAN. 
OUR POPULAR PRICES— 25c and 50c. [Jan. 26. 

BIJOU THEATRE. 

729 Market Sireet.opposite Grant Avenue. Prettiest and Cosiest Theatre 
in the City. 

Every Night and Saturday Matinee. EMERSON'S MINSTRELS. Im- 
mense Success of the Great BILLY EMERSON, as 

MOBIARITY I 

The Daudy M. P. better than ever before. Under the Management of N. D. 

Roberts. The Finest Troupe in the World. The Best Entertainment in the 

City. 

Popular Prioes. Box office open daily from 9 a. m. to 10 p. m. [Jan. 26. 

MRS. DORA GRAY DUNCAN, 

PIANO-FORTE TEACHER, 

Is prepared to furnish Piano-jorte Music for Balls, Parties, Musicales, eto, 
Other Instrumental Musio also provided if desired- 
Address — 1365 Eighth Street (Center Station), Oakland : 

Care of Bruen's Music Store. Broadway, Oakland; 

Or care of Matthias Gray Co., 206 Post Street, S. F. [Deo. 15, 



ATTORNEY 



HENRY C. HYDE, 

AND COUNSELOR 



AT - LAW. 



MICROSCOPICAL EXAMINER 

Of Handwriting, Inks, Papers, etc., in the Detection of Forgeries, 

Counterfeits and Imitations. 

41 IK CALIFORNIA STREET, San Francisco. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 26, 1889. 



THE WORLD, FLESH AND DEVIL. 

\ I / HERE is not a stage in America, writes a Paris correspondent, 
\__i where the costumes of Milly Meyer, of the Renaissance, or 
Mademoiselle Valti, of La Scala, would be tolerated for an 
1 instant. Milly Meyer is probably Paris' pet singer and fun- 
maker at present. She and Mile. Valti share the honors of 
universal popularity with the " boys " of Paris as well as with the 
men and women of both worlds. As a water-carrier in a recent pro- 
duction at the Renaissance, Milly Meyer appears in what, at first, 
seems a very simple little costume. She wears a dainty little slipper 
with a red heel, well-filled black stockings, an apron that comes up 
over the bust and slopes well down under the shoulders, over which 
it is held by two narrow black ribbons, and little else. But she wears 
absolutely nothing above a line drawn half way between her waist 
and her shoulders, and the effect is startling, to say the least of it. 
But for audacity and suggestiveness of attire she cannot touch Valti, 
who has been dressed lately to represent Le Courrier Francaise, a 
lively and patriotic little journal of Paris. There is no cutaneous 
exposure, it is true, except a small amount of lovely neck and a gleam 
of white arm above long black gloves, but the costume is entirely and 
inkily black, and the sharp contrast of the black of the waist, skirt, 
gloves and stockings with the white of the bared arms, the neck and 
the white silk tights, which are drawn over the legs and visible, to no 
small extent, between the knee and the excessively short skirt, make 
a stage picture eminently Parisian as well as highly gratifying to 
this concert queen of the gay capital, who is its newest and most 
famous dancing and singing beauty. Valti's career has brought her 
to the pinnacle of Parisian fame in three years. An unappreciative 
banker abandoned her three years ago in the provinces. She decided 
to go on the concert stage, and made her debut at La Scala in the 
"Winter of 1885-86. She created songs, gestures, costumes, and was 
soon on the crest of the wave. 

Though every American woman is a princess in her own way, the 
sex never was royally treated until the Lawyers' Club was fitted up 
in the Equitable building, says the New York Sun. The magnifi- 
cence of the women's quarters in that clubhouse must amaze the 
average woman, whose invitation comes from some man who may 
not be any better off than to be able to pay a hundred dollars a year 
to belong to the club, It is said that there are no rooms of equal 
magnificence in any clubhouse in ttje world. The woman who enters 
them does so by ringing a porcelain bell that hangs overhead inside, 
and is connected with a silken cord outside the door. A soft-slip- 
pered, demure little woman opens the door and admits the visitor to 
a par|or all in pure white, faintly tipped with gold, and appointed 
With exquisite furniture of old French patterns. The maid takes the 
Visitor's hat and wrap, aqd hearing that a hath |s wanted, offers the 
Jady a soft easy-chair aqq\ a rqagaziue. When sb,e says, " Your bath 
js reaq'y, tqadarq," she leads the lady to a room that looks as if it 
Was put out of a solid block of ivory. The floor is of white marble, 
the walls are of creamy-white glazed tiling, the bath tub is a huge 
basin of artificial stone th.at looks like creamy njarhle. .4 Persian 
rqg jies oq the floor, eyery faqcet and pipe is heavily silver-plated, 
ike ipirrqr aqd chair s^re framed in oliye wood, \yhen rea4y for thje 
bath, the lady gqest iqay take it as she would at home, or she may 
pull all aroqqd her a great street qf waterproof depending from a 
silver ring overhead and treat herself tq a spray bath. She finds at 
hand afterward not only towels, but a little table heaped, with all the 
tools and fripperies of the toilet for the hair, tb e face and the fingers. 
Dressed and ready for the outer world, again, stje is shown to an es-. 
peoial dining-roonj, all white and gol4 again, where rqeals are served 
to her at twenty per cent less than the prices of the Caf 6 Savarin 
which furqisbes them. 



A most remarkable story has recently cropped up about the Holy- 
rood antiquities. Some visitors who lately went through the Queen 
of Scots' apartments were shown by the guide — who seemed to have 
spoken a little beyond his commission— a certain passage and a large 
jutting stone like a step, regarding whi«h the following curious state- 
ment was let fall: A short time ago, when some repairs were being 
made in the Queen of Scots' rooms, a stonemason struck the jutting- 
out stone above mentioned, which rang hollow. He had the curiosity 
to turn it up, and discovered the remains of a baby wrapped in cloth 
of gold and marked "J." Now, it is well known that Mary Stuart 
gave birth to James I. of England and VI. of Scotland in the adjoin- 
ing room, and immediately after the birth that child was removed 
and brought up elsewhere, the Queen showing small interest in her 
offspring. Now, suppose the real child — the realJames — is the infant 
wrapped in cloth of gold lying under that stone, who was the other 
Child who afterward reigned as James I. of England and VI. of Scot- 
' apd? The high personage in London whose business it is to control 
'^qiyroo'd talace sent back word, in reply to a dispatch informing 
inj of the 'discovery, " to make no fuss about it," but to replace the 
a/jy jn cloth ojf gold marked " J." under the stone, and, presumably, 
tbprp he sffll lies". <i-^ J *^ 

Mrs. Mary Hall, a- middle-aged lady of Pasadena, Cal, who passed 
through, the city last njghf;, says the Kansas City Times, has probably 
the most singular calling of 4 n y person in America. She makes a 
business of accompanying the bodies of persons who die in Southern 



California to their homes in the East, and according to her own 
story has found it very lucrative. " I have been at the business 
about two years," said she, at the Union Depot last night, " and I 
find that it is not uncongenial and pays better than anything else I 
can do. I am now on my way home from one of my professional 
trips, but will stop off' at Eldorado, Kan., my old home, for a few 
days to visit relatives. How much do I get for atrip? Different 
prices; generally from $3to$5per day, my railroad fare and traveling 
expenses. I get $3 a day. railroad fare and expenses for this trip, but 
then I took it a little cheaper because I wanted to visit friends. You 
see, the class of people who come to California in search of health 
generally have plenty of money, and many of them put off their 
visits too long. After a patient has been here about five weeks he 
generally dies or gets strong again. The change is so great in the 
climate that it soon makes itself felt. Now it costs double first-class 
express rates to send a body from California to the Missouri river, 
which amounts to about $300; consequently it is cheaper to hire me, 
pay my expenses and feel sure that the corpse will go through safely. 
The number of invalids who go to California is increasing every year 
and my business is fast growing better." 

Mrs. Langtry drives at 3 o'clock on most fine afternoons, and her 
admirers are on hand to catch a passing glimpse of the profile which 
has made her fortune, says the World. Her carriage waiting at the 
curb never fails to draw a crowd of these admirers, who, with a very 
few exceptions, are women of the shoddy, over-dressed, wholly un- 
interesting kind, so familiar at bargain counters and at the Morgue 
after a sensational suicide. To beguile the time they bring packages 
of peppermint drops with them, which they suck, wearing an ex- 
pression of patient expectancy while awaiting the Lily's appearance. 
Before Mrs. Langtry had her high railing and carriage way made she 
suffered a great deal of annoyance. She was forced to walk to the 
curb between rows of staring women, who made audible criticism of 
her face, figure and dress. She stood it patiently for a long time, 
going through the ordeal with the slightest expression of contempt. 
Now, when she is ready her carriage is driven to the door-step, and, 
hidden by the porch, she steps in. When she is driven through the 
gates the watchers see only a wealth of sable, the tip of her nose and 
a pair of indifferent, averted eyes. 

Mrs. James Brown Potter, asserts an exchange, is a " rank " bad 
actress, no doubt, hut off the stage is as sweet as a breath of violets. 
Her very hair is redolent, and not only laces, handkerchief, gloves 
and girdle, but her sleeves, drapery, skirts and even the flowing cloak 
fill the senses with the delicious perfume of that flower every time a 
fold changes or the wearer moves. Every woman of refinement for 
ages has worshiped the incense of odors, and in these days of or- 
iginality and invention, each has a scheme of her own for secretly 
appropriating the favorite scent. Mrs. Potter's hobby is sachet pil? 
lows, of which sh.e has as inany as there are dresses in her trousseau. 
The pillows are a yard long and eighteen inches wide, made of light 
silk, and filled with a layer of wadding and two pounds of violet 
powder. When a dress is folded, the sachet is laid between the skirt 
and waist, qno) when it is w° r n the fragrance is perceptiqle at eyery 
motion. The same care is taken with her gloves aqd linen, and in 
place of the eustocqary shampoq of bay rum or Florida water. tb,e 
reddish-brown tresses are rinsed in extracts of viqlets, for which she 
pays $5 a piqt. 



A story current in Washington last Winter, and revived by the 
Baitpr^ore 4*»erjca7}, in regard to I^ord Sackville, was that on one oc- 
casion, early in the season, his trusted butler asked for and obtained 
permission to visit Baltimore for a few days. Immediately upon his 
arrival there he drove to one of the leading hotels and registered as 
Hon. Lionel Sackville-West. An hour or two later a note was 
handed to him, in which the writer stated that, although personally 
unacquainted with the British Minister, they were desirous of ex- 
tending to him the hospitality of their house during his stay, and 
closed with an invitation that he would be their guest at dinner that 
evening. This invitation was accepted by the butler, who arrayed 
himself in full dress attire and actually attended the dinner, where 
throughout the evening he maintained his assumed character with 
such cleverness that neither his entertainer nor the guests asked in 
his honor ever suspected that he was other than just what he repre- 
sented himself to be — the Minister Plenipotentiary from the Court of 
St. James. 

A lot of young clerks in four large importing houses in Gotham 
are said to have formed a singular syndicate to dress well at small 
expense. Each member pays a nominal entrance fee and small an- 
nual subscription. A fashionable tailor supplies various suits of 
! clothes on the credit of the association. A meeting is held, and 
groups of members about the same hight and build bid for first, sec- 
ond or third choice. The highest bidder has the right to wear the 
new suit for three months, when he passes it on to the next highest 
bidder, who wears it for six months, after which it goes to the lowest 
bidder, who is entitled to strut about in the syndicate garments as 
long as they will last him. If he chooses to return them to the asso- 
ciation after wearing them a few months, a small sum is placed to 
his credit, and the suits are disposed of by contract. The club more 
than pays expenses. 



Jan. 2fi, ISSii. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTER. 



13 



PERSONALITIES. 

mBBproMQl sui tan Isoneol the most onthnnfontlnnhnnniimiirinni 
in Europe. EfewlU piny thvgamfttocboarawitfaoiitintariu&S' 
and will noi ftilon tny mattw of state i*» Interfere with 
tbe proUera in frhiab at the time he la engaged. Bui Ministers 
often Bad taeniae) vet unable to approach the Imperial pree- 
enoOi beoaune the Sultan la deep Lo a game. Tiu-y and their statecraft 
i wnu until he bu checkmated hia adversary or decided upon 
the next move. Abdul Hamid haa bia own court cheaa-player, a Hun- 
garian, who receives a handsome salarj for letting the Sultan win a 
few gamea off him each day. it (a Baid that the present court chess* 
man's predecessor was dismissed from office because he ungenerously 
Insulted by profiting by his superior skill, ami checkuuitod hi* Im- 
perial antagonist every time. The Hungarian master, therefore, plays 
a very poor game to the Sultan, ami makes a point of looking crest- 
fallen at each defeat, whereat the thirty-fifth representative of the 
House of Othatu crows with delight and claps his hands. 



Princess Helene d 'Orleans is more than twice as old as her fiance", 
the Qrand Duke Meads, but the powers that be have decided this to 
be B suitable marriage and noblesse oblige. His Highness the Duke is 
not beautiful — neither refined; very tall, very bald, and very badly 
put together. He is an officer, hut not a gentleman, as he has dis- 
tinctly proved in many instances; one in particular, of interest to 
Americans. When he visited this country, several years ago, he was 
feted aud Mattered, possibly by toadies, but at all events by people 
who treated hint with courtesy. This courtesy he repaid by giving 
most scandalous accouuts of life in America, and introduced into his 
coarse and vulgar stories the names of many prominent and highly 
respected Americans of both sexes. 



President Cleveland is not getting so many presents now as he 
used to. Until election he was constantly receiving all sorts of things 
from inventors and cranks, and people who sought notoriety, but as 
soon as the returns were in presents ceased to come, and everything 
is now going to General Harrison. There is a great falling off in the 
mail at the White House, too. Formerly a large sack of letters was 
carried there three or four times a day. and it took nearly the whole 
time of one clerk simply to open the envelopes and spread out the 
letters for Colonel Laraont and the President to read. Now one 
small sack will hold all the mail that conies to the White House any 
day of the week, aud the clerks are enjoying comparative leisure. 



In a recent Sherwood concert given in Chickering Hall, New York, 
Effie Stewart sang six of Edgar S. Kelley's songs from manuscript, 
which bore the titles of " My Silent Song," " Love's Fillet," " In the 
Garden," " Love and Sleep," " Constancy " and " The Lady Picking 
Mulberries," in which she was accompanied by the composer. In 
the language of the programme of the evening, the motto Mr. Kelley 
has chosen for this series of songs is from Burton's " Anatomy of 
Melancholy." " I am resolved, therefore, in this tragi-comedy of 
love, to act several parts — some satirically, some comically, some in 
a mixed tone." San Francisco music-lovers will be glad to learn that 
the works of their former companion made a success. 

During her recent visit to Greece, the Empress of Austria, desirous 
of showing her appreciation of the extreme courtesy she had received 
from the people of Athens, sent for the Mayor and placed in his hands 
an immense sum of money to be expended for the poor of the city. 
The official expressed his pleasure and gratitude, and returned thanks 
in the name of the people, but assured the Imperial donor that the 
money could not be used as she suggested since there were absolutely 
no poor in the city of Athens. 

As yet no officer in the navy has ever reached the exalted rank of 
Admiral of the Fleet while on what is popularly known as the right 
side of sixty, and it is a striking illustration of the slowness of pro- 
motion in the senior ranks of the naval service when it can be claimed 
for Admiral Lord John Hay, G. C. B., who advanced to the highest 
honor in his profession, that he is at sixty-one years of age the young- 
est flag officer who has ever reached that dignity. 

Annie Louise Cary says the reason she so rarely sings solos is that 
she has entirely lose her confidence in herself since her retirement 
from the stage. She never sings in public, now, except for charity, 
and it has been noticed many times that she appears always in duos 
or quartettes. 

Mme. Patti is to have a four inch dog from Mexico. The little 
brute is a gift from Natalie Testa of the Teatro National, and has 
been entrusted to the tender chaperonage of Marcus Meyer, who will 
see that it reaches Craig-y-nos with all its four inch bones in a state 
of perfect preservation. 

Raoul Koczalski, the child pianist, who is creating a furore at St. 
Petersburg, is only five years of age, and as his little legs are inade- 
quate, his papa works the pedals for him. He plays only Chopin — 
and, it is asserted, plays as Chopin himself might have done. 



Mile. Marie Van Landt, the American prima donna, has been en- 
gaged to sing in her native land next season. 



FURNITURE, CARPETS, UPHOLSTER!, 

FURNITURE DEPARTMENT, 

recently added to our business, 
contains nothing but NEW 
GOODS. 

CARPET DEPARTMENT 

is now daily receiving the new 
SPRING PATTERNS. 

UPHOLSTERY DEPARTMENT 
has just been replenished with 
LATE NOVELTIES. 

W. & J. SLOANE & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail, 

CARPETS! FURNITURE! UPHOLSTERY! 
64 1 -647 MARKET STREET. 

THETEADERS OF EASHIOll 

FINE PARIS WRAPS, 

IMPORTED ULSTERS, 

ELEGANT TEA GOWNS, 
MODJESKAS, 

NEWMARKETS, 

JACKETS, JERSEY WAISTS, 
Chidren's Cloaks and Suits, Monkey Furs, etc. 



The Largest Stock, the Latest Styles, aDd the Best Fitting Cloaks aud Suits 
offered on the Coast, and at the Lowest Possible Prices. 

FINE DRESSMAKING TO ORDER A SPECIALTY. 

Packages delivered free of charge in Oakland, Alameda and Berkeley. 
Telephone 803. 

FRATINGER'S, 

The Leading Cloak and Suit House, 

I05 Kearny Street. [Nov. 24. 

Electric Improvement Co. 

ELECTRIC STREET RAILWAYS, 

AMERICAN SYSTEM OP ELECTRIC ARC LIGHTING, 

STANDARD UNDERGROUND CO.'S LEAD-COVERED CABLES, 

MATHER SYSTEM OE INCANDESCENT LIGHTING, 

ELECTRIC LIGHT WIRES, LAMPS, ETC. 

Estimates furnished for Electric Railways, Electric Light and Steam 
Plants. 

OFFICE, 2I7 SANSOME STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

JAS. DUFFY & CO., 

I1TTEBIOB TJBOOBATOBS. 

WALL PAPER— Endless Variety of Patterns, 

FIRST-CLASS WORK GUARANTEED. 

CARPETS, WINDOW SHADES, ETC. 

81 J Market Street, Flood Building. 

J. TOMKINSON'S LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 

Nos. 57, 59 and 61 Minna Street, 

Bet. First and Second, San Francisco. One Block Irom Palace Hotel. 

J0^- Carriages and Cabs at Pacific Club, No. 130 Post street; also North- 
east Cor. Montgomery and Bush. Carriages and Coupes Kept at stable espe- 
cially for calling. Turnouts to rent by the month. Vehicles of every 
description at reduced rates. Telephone No. 158. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 26, 1889. 



FINANCIAL REVIEW. 

7 ROM the following letter, just received, it will be seen that the 

J devil has broken loose again. Union Gold Hamilton having 
\a probably soured on California or California on him, has again 
sought the more congenial atmosphere of Mexico. Fallen 
back on bis old trade, experting mines witb a camera: 

Editor News Letter :— We get your valuable raining paper, and as miners 
we truly appreciate the expression of your opinion iu regard to mines and 
mining. We are pleased with your just and able denunciation of that class 
of men who run around the country with big instruments, scaring burro 
and pack-mule trains, which have always been in the habit of going along 
nice and gentle until the advent of these peculiarities. Not only are the 
animals scared, but also the natives, who are filled with surprise, and 
wonder if it is a new improvement on the old Chili mill. It is the same 
old story over again— picture experts. This country has had a rough deal 
from these people, as you are fully aware. 

The latest acquisition we have down here now is C A. Hamilton, well 
known iu connection with the Mulattos crowd and traveling agent of the 
Lloyd combination, and we are informed by reliable authority that he is 
well supplied with photographic apparatus. The camera will certainly tell 
the truth if let alone, but the accompanying statements would be a hard 
pill to swallow. In all cases, so far, the statements made have been de- 
structive to all parties concerned. It is not necessary to repeat what sad 
affairs these "picture men " have caused here in old Mexico; you are well 
acquainted with several. Now, what seems strange to us miners and 
prospectors is, how can speculators iu San Francisco and abroad tolerate 
such a class of men about them. It certainly seems to us that California 
has able, practical and competent mining men— men of honor and reputa- 
tion— whose word is good and can be relied upon, which is a very import- 
ant consideration. So far as we miners are concerned, so far we have failed 
to find any of these "picture men" fill the bill, and it certainly seems 
strange that with all your able experts, that you cannot send representative 
experts here to examine mines, instead of men who are totally ignorant of 
mining, who have no practical knowledge, whose reports are not worth the 
paper on which they are written. We miners are tired of such a class of 
men, and until reliable and practical meu come to the front, the failures 
brought about by " picture experts " will continue. Evidence of the facts 
can be seen here. We hope that you will give this brief note space in your 
valuable paper, and that you will continue the good work you have taken 
up. Place "picture experts" in the ranks where they belong. They are 
not wanted in the country, interfering iu a business of which they are per- 
fectly ignorant, thereby causing destruction to legitimate mining. 

Sinaloa, Mexico, December 18, 1888. Miners. 

About two years ago we advised English investors to be cautious in 
their expenditure of money on the Ilex property of Calaveras. The 
suggestion resulted in a visit from a Mr. Petrie, the local manager. 
This gentleman informed us that it was a private concern. That his 
own money and that of his relatives, including one of the most noble 
of England's Peers, was invested in the matter, and that the public 
were not interested in the undertaking. We therefore simply dropped 
the matter on the generally recognized principle that people have a 
right to do what they like with their own money, even to throwing it 
down a hole in the ground. Surface improvements went merrily on 
and vast additional tracts of ground were taken up. The inevitable 
failure ensued, one of the worst which has been recorded for many 
years. It does not appear to have been such a family mine after all, 
but information so far received from London is meagre. The work- 
ing returns for August, 2,750 tons with 40 stamps, were $4,359, at the 
rate of $1.58 per ton. September, 4,521 tons, $9,425, equal to a little 
over $2 per ton; in October with 20 stamps, 3,950 tons, $3,150, less 
than $1 per ton. This was certainly a fine grade of ore to warrant 
the erection of an expensive mill. Almost as sensible an operation 
as that at the Union Gold in the same county. The company in 
London then ordered a special crushing as a test and obtained an 
average of $3.64 per ton. Mr. Johns of the Sierra Buttes was then 
called in as an expert. In his report he says it is very difficult to 
advise on future operations. He does not believe the vein will be 
profitable at greater depth, and if the future is to be judged by the 
past there is little hope for further experiments. He advises selling 
all unnecessary machinery and materials to raise funds to connect 
the shaft with an old drift, and says if nothing is found there the ex- 
penditure on machinery and property may be considered a dead loss. 
As there is still considerable money due to the original vendors of 
certain portions of the ground, shareholders are not so badly off as 
they might have been. 

That the names of all experts and promoters are now carefully 
scrutinized in London in connection with any scheme which may 
appear on the market is apparent from the opposition experienced 
by the vendors of the La Gloria mines ot Mexico, recently floated. 
Hardly had the prospectus appeared before a victimized shareholder 
in another Mexican incorporation inquired through the press whether 
the expert who reported on the property was not the same person 
,who had previously reported on the Sonora silver mine, the shares of 
which, £1 paid, are now selling for 9d., at the same time suggesting 
that before the public subscribe for one share this question should be 
settled. This simple query had the effect of checking the ardor of 
investors to an extent anything but satisfactory to the promoters. 
This does not argue favorably for any California enterprises intended 
for London and backed by promoters who have cleaned up a small 
pile in the past at the expense of their reputation. 



A late issue of the Engineering and Mining Journal contains a 
statement that the object of George M. Pinney's visit to the Pacific 
Coast was to obtain a bond on the Eagle Bird Mine. If his trip was 
undertaken for that purpose, we have reason to believe that he has 
signally failed. Ever since the litigation was ended and the mine be- 
came the property of Mr. Oscar Newhouse, he has devoted his entire 
time and expended considerable money in rectifying the mistakes of 
the old management, and has steadily refused to bond or sell, al- 
though importuned to do so by responsible parties. Recent advices 
from the mine are to the effect that the plant and arrangements are 
now in apple-pie order, and second to none in the State. The work 
of development goes steadily on, Mr. Newhouse refusing, however, 
to give any information further than that he discounts his bills and 
pays off at the mine on the tenth of the month. There are few better 
judges of a mine on the Coast than the present owner of the Eagle 
Bird, and, from his complacency, it would appear that he is satisfied 
to hold and work the property legitimately. Who ever succeeds in 
purchasing this property will find it valuable. There is now ore 
enough in sight to justify the erection of at least one hundred stamps, 
involving an additional outlay for an increased water supply. The 
mine would then be one of the large and steady bullion producers of 
the State. 

The Nevills property of Calaveras is the property that Gillette and 
Lloyd are about to make a grand effort to sell in London. The sale 
has not been closed yet, as reported, and the chances are that it never 
will be when people come to find out that the scheme is presented by 
Gillette of the Josephine, Hamilion of the Union Gold, and Lloyd of 
the Mulattos. If the British investor permits himself to be trapped 
again by these men, it will be in the face of repeated warning. Leave 
the Nevills alone ; it is simply another fake like the Josephine of 
Fresno. 

The Comstock market has been dull and inactive during the week, 
with lower prices. The Tuscarora mines seem to be attracting the 
lion's share of Public interest just now, which is not unnatural, 
considering that this camp is now on the eve of bullion production, 
after many years' labor in developing the mines and building ma- 
chinery. Experts who have for years scoffed at anything located out 
of sight of Mt. Davidson, have recently visited the district, and 
heavy purchases of stock on their account shows their belief in its 
future. 

The Eastern investor has had another expensive lesson in Mexican 
mining. We understand that the Los Animas, recently purchased by 
St. Louis capitalists, has proved a complete failure. The ore re- 
serves, for which a costly mill was erected, produced about $30,000 
and then gave out. The superintendent, a very capable man from 
California, has resigned, having no hope for the future of the prop- 
erty. Rube Rickard is said to have been the expert who made the 
sale. 

The eighth annual report of the Mining Bureau has just been issued 
by the State Mineralogist, William Irelan, Jr. It is an interesting 
and instructive document, and reflects great credit on Mr. Irelan 
and his corps of assistants. Among the writers who have contributed 
papers on various subjects connected with mining, milling and 
geology, are the well-known names of Melville Attwood, John Hays 
Hammond, Joel F. Ross, James H. Cochran, Dr. R. N. Brown and 
W. Smith. 

The Mexican papers are now rigorously defending the various rail- 
road companies throughout the country, and trying to show how 
traffic barely sufficient for one line can be stretched to supply a doz- 
en. An editor who would dare to utter anything to the contrary 
would find himself denounced as an enemy to the Republic. This is 
a pleasant little way of choking off comment, if not the commenta- 
tor, by the liberal and enlightened Mexican Government. The Mexi- 
can Pacific Coast Railroad is to be built on the prospective trade in- 
crease during the next century. 

It is estimated that of the sixty millions sterling sunk in the Pan" 
ama Canal bubble, ten per cent, has gone to French bankers, five per 
cent, has been paid in bribes to the French press, ten per cent, has 
gone to the inner members of the Canal Ring, who have had the giv- 
ing out of the contracts, and most of the balance has gone to enrich 
the contractors. It is estimated that less than one-eighth of the work 
has even now been done. 

The Vanderbilt fortune, in the aggregate, amounts to about $274,- 
000,000, the income of which is estimated at $13,864,400. 



It is said that a number of letters have been exchanged by Presi- 
dent Cleveland and President-elect Harrison since the election. Mrs. 
Harrison has also been in weekly correspondence with Mrs. Cleve- 
land with reference to numerous household affairs, which a woman 
of Mrs. Harrison's domectic thoughtfulness and care would deem 
important to know. It is reported by those who seem to speak from 
knowledge of past changes of White House occupants, that more 
friendly relationship with the outgoing and incoming families never 
existed. 



.Tan. 26, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



16 





1 Hear the Crier! " "Wbjfl tbedevtl art thou.*" 
•Oue th»t will play ihclovll, »lr, with you." 

Hi: Associated Press has kindly telegraphed to as the Intelll- 

= ; J gom-e (hut Rabeastein proposes to write a cantata oommem- 

* onllveol ! the Gsar and Gsarina from a railroad 

i accident. This affords the musician a wide swathe. He wUl 

begin with :i Btratn illustrative of the starting of the train. 

The plcolo will whistle, and the fellow who attends to the cymbals 

bang them for all they are worth. Then conies the moving away, ami 

the shriek and clamor of the engine, mingled with the bellowing of 

every one connected with the machine. I imagine the trombone 

and ophadtde would basi express the crash, while some one standing 

behind the bass drum should welt him with a stout cudgel to keep 

him up to the mark. When their imperial giblets step from the 

ruined carriage, something sweet and touching, telling the audience 

that a little court-plaster will make them as good as new, might be 

given. Rubenslein understands it all himself, and will rake in a nice 

sack of roubles for his efiorts. But I do wish that our Joe Redding 

might be there to lead the orchestra, and then there could be no 

possibility of a break down. 

The dear old newspaper fight has broken out again just as fresh 
as if the ('"tl had never swapped billingsgate with the Chronicle t and 
the Examiner had exchanged items with its more ancient rivals; and 
all for nothing. The public does not care a brass penny about these 
affairs that seem of such paramount importance to the gentlemen of 
the dailies. The man who buys a newspaper buys it for the news it 
contains, and, in rare cases, is inclined to set a trifling value upon 
the opinions it expresses— if they happen to coincide with his own. 
And here it ends. In the personnel of the newspaper he takes no in- 
terest. Who is wrong and who is right— whether the Gall is taking 
an unfair advantage of the Examiner, or the Examiner is applying its 
literary boot to the AUa, or one or all are suffering from dry rot, lack 
of enterprise, etc., etc.— does not concern him one particle. The 
paper that gives him the news in its best and most complete form 
represents to him the soundest investment of his nickel. There he 
stops. Everything else is to him village information. He does not 
see it in the Eastern papers he may read, and he regrets that lack of 
discretion which shows it in the press of his own city. For the 
Lord's sake, let it stop. There is not a dollar to be made or lost in 
it, and the dollar is the main end of newspaper publication. 

What has become of the Eastern tourist? 

He lingers yet where the clime is poorest, 

And where the shivering knave endurest 

The snow that snows, and the rain that pourest, 

While we out here are sick of sighing 

For that Eastern man, who thinks we 're lying 

About the lands and fruits, and trying 

To catch his ducats. May the weather 

Freeze the tourist's jaws together, 

Pierce his bones and make him shiver, 

Make his wife and babies quiver 

With the cold, and keep them jawing 

For some warm spot to thaw in — 

Till the tourist, ducats bearing, 

Westward Hies. Then we will share in 

His good sack, for which we '11 give him 

Climate, and some lots to live in. 

A benefit is arranging for Mr. Joe McAuliffe, whose disastrous 
trip over the color line is still discussed by those gentlemen who ad- 
mire the fancy. A meeting was held on an evening this week for the 
purpose of bringing the talent together, and the response was most 
gratifying to the heads of the various committees. Our California 
boy was not present, having been thrown from a wagon by a favorite 
thoroughbred of his which he was exercising at the time. This fact, 
quaintly stated in one of our dailies, shows us to what a depth of des- 
titution " Our Joe " must have fallen. A gentleman who can afford 
to keep and drive a thoroughbred horse is, according to modern 
standard, plunged in poverty. He is sadly in need of help. He 
must have his friends rally around him, or he will perish from sheer 
lack of food. Perhaps it would be better if this entertainment were 
advertised for the benefit of Mr. McAuliffe's horse. The bones of 
that wretched beast must be sticking through his skin, and a good 
pull at the box-office would keep him in oats till the end of the year. 
Again, however, he cannot have been kept on short rations, for he 
was frisky enough to send his master end over end and damage his 
ribs. It is an odd thing clear through, and the nut to crack is the 
why and wherefore of the benefit. 

The Sacramento correspondents seem to think it very funny that 
Mr. Boruck should write Governor Waterman's messages. That is 
what Mr. Boruck is there for, and the great secretary is no slouch at 
rounding a period, either. As His Excellency once remarked, " I 
can herd up the little nouns and articles, but, bless your heart, it 
takes Boruck to drive the big, long adjectives into the corral!" 



In Paris— 'twas almost a year ago, 

\i a bal-raasque, in carnival time. 
I wore the motley; the ebb and How 

the reckless crowd, like some ancient rhyme 

Of folly and mirth. Whtofa had power, they Bay, 

To win men's hearts ir the present, and be 

Of the morrow careless, with naught to stay 

The current of riotous, reckless glee, 
So filled me, and thrilled me, that, reckless of all, 

I danced and sang, and my song was load. 
But one there was in that brilliant hall— 

One sweet girl-face in that garish crowd- 
One low, soft voice that drew me apart 

From the rush and revel, by her to stand; 
And the longing that lille.l my throbbing hear! 

When she smiled on me, and I took her hand. 
Was a dream and a story. I know not how, 

But I know— oh, darling, so kind and fair- 
Ton, with the stars on your low, sweet brow 

Of the Queen of Night, and your rich, dark hair 
With rare pearls glistening—and I, the clown, 

In motley decked, bells, wand and cap, 

Were together drawn : and I there laid down 

My heart, oh, love, in your silken lap! 

A rush and a tumult, a curse and a blow 

In the light of the morning, dim and gray, 
I am hurried over the shining snow 

To avenge an insult, my comrades say. 
No time have we at honor's call 

To deck ourselves for this grim parade; 
We wear the costumes we wore at the ball, 

And each takes from his second a gleaming blade. 
What is it all about? God knows, 

I only remember a smile and a kiss, 
And a soft hand's pressure, the gift of a rose, 

A curse, a scuffle, the insult and this. 
In Paris, 'twas almost a year ago, 

When face to face with my rival I stood, 
And thrust, and marked on the virgin snow 
The crimson tints of his heart's best blood. 

Looking the other day at a number of excellent prints in the art 
shop (I suppose I should call it emporium) of a friend of mine, I was 
impressed by an excellent engraving from Jerome's beautiful picture, 
" The Duel After the Ball." Therefore I wrote the above verses, 
presuming on the universally accepted fact thai no duel of that sort 
could take place without there was a woman in the case. Oh, Tele- 
machus, child of my affections, before thy Mentor's hair grew gray, 
and his teeth loose and discolored, and his waist nowhere, he couid 
tell thee tales of masquerades long gone by that would make thy 
youthful blood course through thy transparent veins with alarming 
celerity. May peace be thine, William Stine erstwhile, and for all I 
know now, at present editor of that excellent Conservative paper, the 
St, James Gazette of London, England. Thou earnest, William, to 
these United States, and thou wert full of thirst for the ways and 
pastimes of the American people. Therefore it behoveth Mr. Sime's 
cicerones to conduct him to a masquerade ball. And by the mask of 
Momus, he happened in at the stormiest one ever given in this fair 
city. u Why," said the distinguished literateur, when the first row 
began, " this reminds me of old England." And then the fist of the 
irreverend hoodlum smote him under the left ear, and his hat flew 
one way and his gold spectacles the other, while he lay on the floor 
wondering whether he was in the Haymarket or Drury Lane on box- 
ing night. But he was a game man, was Sime, and when be pulled 
himself together and washed the blood off his face, he said it would 
be a good item for the Gazette, and so it was. 

Telemachus, when you marry let it be years and years before you 
give your spouse a taste of the delights of the foreign restaurant after 
dark! Noon lunches are innocent affairs which can do no harm, but 
the razzle-dazzle of an evening whoop-up has a bad effect upon the 
mind of the matrou. They grow disgusted with home cookery, and 
long for those nice grills, washed down with tepid Burgundy. Bless- 
ed is the woman who can say from the bottom of her heart that she 
has no relish for French gew-gaws, and who clings to the honest beef 
steak and the unassuming chop with the affection of the natural ap- 
petite. But if the matron be possessed with the ambition to do in her 
own household as great things as the chef in his dominions, then is 
her husband a giant among the pigmies, whose intellects are stunted 
by hash, and impulses snowed under by the indigestible doughnut. 

Now that our fleet has sailed away to conquer the haughty Ger- 
man, and that England is talking big and threatening to pull 
Bismarck's nose, and that France is shaking her little Boulanger in 
the eyes of the world, it is in order for the gentlemen of the press to 
sharpen their pencils and predict a great European war. But the 
fighting will only be on paper. The world is too busy keeping shop 
to fight, and England's little skirmishes in Suakin are only sufficient 
to keep her army from utterly rusting over. 

" Decaying Contemporary " is a term of respect and affection 
found almost any day in the editorial columns of any of the dailies. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 26, 1889. 



LETTER FROM BOLOGNA. 

Bologna, December 25. 1888. 
~~>. EAR, KATE: Bologna, of Etruscan origin, was in 190 B. C. 

\J_\ made a Roman colony, after the friendly assistance it had 

h) / given to Hannibal during the Punic wars; by Charlemagne 
_ —/ it was made a free town, and it boasts of the oldest European 
university, established in 1119, which, in the thirteenth cen- 
tury, counted nearly ten thousand students, though at present only 
about four hundred attend lectures. In matters of art the city did 
not attain distinction until the Gothic era. when the large church of 
St. Petronio was begun, but unfortunately never finished; still Bo- 
logna has a quantity of beautiful palaces ; one of the most interesting 
is the Palazzo del Podesta, where King Enzio, son of Frederic Barba- 
rossa, in the thirteenth century was kept a prisoner during twenty 
long years, and to his love for the beautiful Lucia Vendagoli the 
proud Bentivogli family owes its existence. 

I will not enumerate all the architectural and other monuments 
that embellish the place, but only remind you of its famous sausages, 
which in gigantic size surpass anything else of the kind I have ever 
seen, and form a staple article of commerce. One thing is certain, 
Bologna is not much frequented by tourists, and not up to all the 
tricks common to those places that live on the unsuspecting foreigner, 
you need not count your change half as carefully here as in some 
other Italian cities, where, unless you are cautious, you will find 
yourself cheated out of many half francs at shops and restaurants; 
otherwise, however, the place has a most pronounced Italian char- 
actor; its streets are narrow and dirty enough to suitail picturesque 
requirements. The people seem to live outdoors, and be easily 
pleased with the amusements there found. Within half an hour I 
saw on the square fronting our windows four different crowds gath- 
ered round the same number of attractions : One was a street juggler 
accompanied by a rather good looking young woman in scientist rai- 
ment, who both performed old tricks to the intense delight of their 
audience; another, a hungry-looking female of the Salvation Army 
persuasion, I judged, was preaching to a laughing crowd; still an- 
other was manipulating cards, evidently telling fortunes, while only 
a few steps farther a quartette of young fellows tilled the air with the 
melody of pretty Italian songs. And the whole crowd kept moving 
to and fro, the men with their long, full cloaks, that they drape so 
gracefully around their shoulders, the women with gay-colored hand- 
kerchiefs tied over their glossy black hair ; the picture was made full 
enough to inspire a painter. 

1 had come to Bologna with a friend who wished to consult the fa- 
mous doctor Count Cesar Mattei, the apostle of Electro-Homeopathy, 
who by his adherents is considered a demi-god, by his opponents, 
principally alleopatbic physicians, as a charlatan. We had been told 
he lived here, and great was our disappointment oo learning that he 
resided at Riola, a small place about two hours distant situated on 
the Reno river. We had gone so much out of our way to see the 
celebrated man that we resolved to travel two hours farther, and 
starting the next morning at seven o'clock, arrived at our destina- 
tion at nine o'clock precisely, a fact worth chronicling, because trains 
in Italy are seldom on time. I shall always remember the little vil- 
lage in the Appenines, for it was here we had our first tussle with the 
musical idiom of classic Dante, which we both barely knew sufficient- 
ly to understand the libretto of an Italian opera when given with 
English translation. We wanted a guide to take us to the hotel, 
where we hoped to find our medico, and my friend asked for a bambi- 
no, which you know is the Italian for baby boy, but anticipating our 
wish, the guard smilingly brought us a sixty year old specimen of 
the desired article, who silently led us through the soft mud of the 
road to the door of the Albergo de la Rosa, pocketed his three cents 
with a pleased grin and many grac-ias, and left us to our fate. Fortu- 
nately, the little waiting maid who answered our knocking spoke 
some French, and succeeded in making us comprehend that first of 
all my friend's card had to be sent to Count Mattei, who lived a her- 
mit's life at the Castello de la Rochetta, and whose decision in re- 
gard to a consultation we would have to await. After having follow- 
ed instructions, we were served luncheon, and with appetites sharp- 
ened by the bracing mountain air, did justice to the savory repast. 
In about an hour our messenger brought the desired answer. We at 
once ordered a carriage, only to be told that such a luxury was un- 
known to Riola civilization ; we then pleaded for donkeys to carry 
us up the steep, slippery road, and after much trouble succeeded in 
securing the services of a young mountaineer, who agreed to take us 
up on his cart, drawn by a tiny, gray donkey. The vehicle consisted 
of two wheels and a square of net-work, nailed on four laths of equal 
length; on this foundation a seat was placed. By means of a short 
ladder we reached the net, the meshes of which proved too large for oar 
little American feet, for we slipped through and had to be extricated 
from our perilous position and secured on the seat. Finally, the 
driver started his animal, and without any accident we passed over 
the steep roads and soon reached the door of the castle, a decidedly 
original structure that, with the natural rocks as foundation and part 
walls, looks like a fortress of considerable strength. It is supplied 
with a drawbridge and four towers, from which the surrounding 
country could be well overlooked. 

After our entering the heavy iron gate and ascend in &othe broad 
stone steps, a servant ushered us into a sort of office or studio of 
Moorish style ; on the walls were two charts covered with cabalistic 



signs. One side of the room was taken up by a broad wooden bench ; 
a door, with simple, half open portieres, led into the adjoining dining 
hall; opposite this is a sort of elevated recess, surrounded by black 
marble columns, which give it the air of a Greek temple. Our eyts 
were riveted on this mysterious temple, as if we expected the oracle of 
the place to issue from there. We were not mistaken. In a few 
minutes Monsieur le Count descended the marble steps (I afterwards 
learned that the mystic niche formed the connecting link between the 
upper and lower floor, where his elegant private apartments are situ- 
ated), and greeted us with the perfect manner of a man of the world. 

My friend stated her case; the count, who, by the way, is quite an 
elderly, fine-looking gentleman, convinced her that electricity, which 
he claims to have reduced to a liquid form, would undoubtedly cure 
her illness, gave her the necessary remedies, dismissed her with glad 
hopes of speedy recovery, and— to our great humiliation— without ac- 
cepting any consultation fee whatever, declaring that his talent was 
at the service of suffering humanity. No wonder the physicians hate 
him. We remounted our quaint donkey cart, and now enjoyed the 
drive over the rocky mountain path, along precipices and wooded 
hillside, until we reached the station. Curiosity prompted us to 
question the French speaking station master, who could not praise 
enough the eccentric master of Rochetta castle, which he had built 
without architect's aid, solely by the work of his peasants. For 
twenty years the doctor has lived a recluse, fearing that professional 
envy and hatred might attempt his life; but ever ready to assist those 
who surfer, he has spent much of his immense fortune in benefiting 
his fellowmen. 

With logical appreciation of cause and effect we devoted the next 
day to Campo Santo, the burying ground of Bologna. In no country 
is as much respect shown to the dead as in Italy. Nobody, from the 
nobleman in his carriage to the beggar on the street, passes a funeral 
without lifting his hat, and that reminds me that in Bologna you 
never meet these mournful processions in the daytime; the corpse is 
always brought to Campo Santo in the night, accompanied by a priest, 
received by the tolling of the bells, and the burial takes place the 
next morning. The cemetery, open to all Christian sects, is situated 
on the site of an old Etruscan burying ground. At the entrance are 
the ancient tombstones that were placed here when the great Napo- 
leon, during his Italian campaigns, suppressed the churches so as to 
use their art and money treasures for the embellishment of Paris and 
the payment of his war expenses. 

The modern tombs form long galleries of marble monuments or 
catacombs in tiers. One of the finest is that of the Marchesa Letitia 
Pepoli, daughter of Murat. Napoleon's brother-in-law, who, after the 
battle of Waterloo, was shot by the Bourbons. His life-size statue, 
represented in full military dress, seems to stand guard over his 
daughter's grave. Another prominent monument is the statue of 
Napoleon's sister, Eliza. 

The poor, who can afford no costly grave stones, are buried in the 
center square of soft ground, and are allowed the hospitality of Cam- 
po Santo only for the period of ten years; then the bones are ex- 
humed and burned. Different departments are reserved for the two 
sexes; soldiers are kept apart from civilians, priests from laymen. 

On the handsome tomb of the noble Brunetti family we noticed a 
whole mountain of the most beautiful flowers, and were told a touch- 
ing romance of the young countess, who had committed suicide only 
a few days before, because the family opposed her wedding the man 
of her love, a poor sculptor, and that was why, at her funeral, two 
thousand dollars worth of flowers had been placed on her grave. 

Campo Santo, with its marbles, its poetical legends of eternal 
mourning, held us in its fascination for hours. The weather was 
mild, the roses bloomed outdoors, there was nothing to suggest 
Christmas, until we returned to the city for a stroll through the fish 
market, which presented an unusually busy appearance, for fish, es- 
pecially eel, is the standard dish for Christmas eve, and among the 
people is used as expression of the compliments of the season, as 
sweetmeats are with us. 

We celebrated the holy night by attending midnight mass at St. 
Bartolomeo, where a crowd promenaded through the aisles during 
divine service, where the music floated through and re-echoed 
from the dome, softly accompanying the chant of the priest, to whom 
nobody seemed to listen. Hirondelle. 

3. F. News Letter will be sentweeklyto auyaddress in the Uaited States 
for $1.25 for 3 mouths. ?2.50 for 6 months, or $o for 12 mouths. The subscrip- 
tion for the Continent, Great Britain aud the Colouies is: 3 months, $1.50; 
6 months, ¥3; 12 mouths, $C. All subscriptions are payable in advance, and 
checks and P. O. O.'s should be made payable to Publisher S. F. News 
Letter, Flood Building, Market street, S. F. 

SCHEMMEL'S MUSIC HOUSE, 

72, 74, 76 and 78 East Santa Clara Street, San Jose, Cal, 

STEINWAY & SONS' and 

GEORGE STECK & CO.'S 
F I .A-3<r O S - 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY. 

No. 810 Sansome Street, : : San Francisco 
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN FURS. 



Jan. 26, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




1 1 E U K is a change ol late years in the 

heat of American homes in winter. 

With almost universal substitution 
1 of better forms of heaters for old-time 

stoves, and better understanding of 
ordinary health laws by the people, has come a cooling down of the 
suffocating temperature that made our homes dry forcing houses. 
Except in rooms where sick are or aged persons, mercury should 
never rise above 70 deg., nor fall below 65 deg. A narrow range, 
truly, but within such strict limits lies the zone of health. 

If the Eastern newspapers would take up the question of the 
prevalence of diphtheria in San Francisco, Oakland and other Cali- 
fornia cities, and warn people not to come to a State where the laws 
of hygiene are shamefully neglected, the chances are that they would 
do more to stamp out diphtheria in California than anything the local 
press can say or do. We are tired of the subject. YVe are weary of 
repeating that the disease is owing to entirely preventable causes. It 
seems to be useless to tell the local authorities that they are re- 
sponsible for the many deaths that are occurring. Some outside 
pressure might wake them up. 

Dr. Grudman, of Hirschberg, Germany, has patented a new pro- 
cess of making magnesia into a carbonate by exposing it to carbonic 
acid as produced by burning coke in close apartments. It thus forms 
a substance as hard as magnesia, and capable of taking a fine polish. 
Mixed with marble-dust it forms an artificial dolemite, with soluble 
silicates, an artificial stucco. 

The practice of having night-lights in children's bedrooms is pro- 
nounced very injurious by well-known physioians. Instead of allow- 
ing the optic nerves the perfect rest afforded by darkness, the light 
keeps them in perpetual stimulation, with the result of causing the 
brain and the rest of the nervous system to suffer. 

Jt seems that " dry-rot," the enemy of builders, is a sort of conta- 
gious disease. Good authorities state that it can be carried by saws 
and other tools whioh have been in oontaot with infected wood, and 
that such transmission and impregnation is often the cause of the 
mysteriously rapid decay of originally sound timbers. 

An electro magnet with a oarrying capacity of 800 pounds is at- 
tached to a crane in the Cleveland, O., steel works, and readily picks 
up and handles billets and other masses of iron without the use of 
chains, tougs or other devioes. A mere lad is thus enabled to do 
the work of \4 or 15 men. 

Hemp rape contraots if it is wet; a dry rope twenty-five (25) feet 
long is shortened to twenty-four (24) feet on being wet. And it should 
not be forgotten that a wet rope has only about one-third iy s ) of the 
strength of a dry rope, while if saturated with grease or soap it is 
weaker still. 

There appears to be a strong current of opinion setting in against 
the use of cast steel in the* larger details of ships and ship machinery. 
The tendency to develop flaws in large castings and the consequent 
loss and delay entailed may be ascribed as the great objection. 

It is stated thata workman in the Carson, Nevada, Mint has made 
the discovery that drill points may be so tempered electrically that 
they will penetrate the hardest steel or plate glass by being heated to 
a cherry red and then driven into a piece of lead. 

The strongest ■wood in the United States is the nutmeg hickory of 
Arkansas, the weakest the West Indian birch, the most elastic is the 
tamarac, the best for fuel is the bluewood of Texas, the hardest and 
toughest is the hickory, and the softest is the white pine. 

To polish nickel-plating when it becomes dull, use jewelers' rouge 
and fresh lard, or lard oil, applied to a piece of chamois skin. Rub 
the parts, using as little of the mixture as possible, and wipe off with 
a clean, slightly oiled rag, or some cotton waste. 

It is said that if tri-phospbate of soda be dissolved in the feed 
water, and then allowed to stand for several hours before being sup- 
plied to the boiler, that little or no incrustation will take place. 

Polished granite is much more durable than hammered granite, as 
polishing the stone prevents the lodging of moisture and foreign par- 
ticles on its surface. 

Metals and glass may be polished with a mixture of very finely 
ground glass with a very small proportion of dried soda ash. 

Mortar will not corrode galvanized iron when imbedded in it, but 
it will corrode lead pipe badly. 

Poison-oak cured by Steele's Grindelia Lotion. Twenty years' experience 
has proved this remedy to be a. specific. Apply immediately after returning 
from, a picnic excursion, and the dread eruption will be pieveuted. James 
G. Steele & Co., 635 Market s treet. 

D.Albert Hilleb.M. D.,1011dutterstreet, San Francisco, California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Gould & Curry Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment. •■■ mw?;,?,i 

Amouut per Share ■ ,„ 12JS 

Levied January 10, 1889 

Delinquent in Office February 14, 1889 

Dav of Sale of Delinquent Stock March 7, 1889 

uay oi oaio h ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 

Office- Room 69, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, Sau Francisco, 
California. |Jau. 12, 

Headache caused from defective sight relieved by Muller, the expert 
Optician, 135 ftlontgomery, near Bush. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Nevada Queen Mining Company. 

Location of principal place Of bu .Is f'rriiitt. Lo- 
cation ol norks— Tuncarora Mining District, Elko C ily, Nevada, 

Nottoe it hereby riven that at a i Ungol Ihc Board ol Directors, held 

on the 21st day of December, 1(88, an s imonl (No. *) ol Plfij 

por share was levied u| h ipttal stock ol the corporation, payable 

Immediately i" United Slates gold coin. i. the Secretary, at Hi n I the 

Company, room 62, Nevada Block, No. 809 Montgomery street, Sau Fran- i 
CisCOi i alifornla. 

Any stock upon which Ibis assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 28lh day ol January. 1889, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for Bale hi public miction; and unless payment is made ho 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the 26th day ol February, 188). to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertiaiug and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

HENRY DBAS, Secretary. 

Office— Room 62, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, Sau FrauolaCO, 
California. . [Dec. 29. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE, 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company, 

Location of priucipal place of business— San Francisco, California; loca- 
tion of works— Silver Star Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
on the 27th day of December, 188S, an assessment (No. B) of Tuenlvfive 
Cents (25c) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States t,'uld coin, tn the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, room 69, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, California. 

Any sto&k upon which this assessment Bhall remain unpaid on 
The 31st Day of January, 1889 will b-t delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the 25th day of February, 1889, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79 Nevada Block, No. 30u Montgomery street, Sau Fran- 
cisoo, California. \\)ec. 29. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. " 

Savage Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of Business— Sau Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works — Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, held 
on the 7th day of January, 18S9, an assessment (No. 721 of Fifty Cents (50c) 
per share was levied upou the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the oflice of the 
Company, room 4, Nevada Block, No. 3u9 Montgomery street, Sau Francisco, 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 11th day of February, 1889, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on MONDAY, the 4th day of March, 1883, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together.with the costs of advertising aud expenses 

E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 
Office— Room 4, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. [Jan. 1'2. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Union Consolidated Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— Sau Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 4th day of January, 1889, an assessment (No. 37) of Twenty-five 
Cents (25c) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, room 11, No. 303 California street, San Francisco, 
California, 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 8th day of February, 1889, will he delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on FRIDAY, the 1st day of March, 1889. to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

* J. M. BUFFINGTON, Secretary. 

Office— Room 11, No. 303 California street, Sau Francisco, Cal. [Jan. 12. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

North Belle Isle Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Tusearora, Elko County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
ou the 3d day of January, 1889, an assessment (No. 14) of Fifty (50) 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, pay- 
able immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office 
of the Company, No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 aud 17, Sau Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 6th day of February, 1889, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 27th day of February, 188y, to pay 
the delinqent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. W. PEW, Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, Cal. [ Jan. 12. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 26, 1889. 




, \T NASMUCH as the real-estate market has been 
\ showing signs of slacking up since the new year 
( j began, the agents evidently seem to consider it 
their duty to urge matters along. And this they 
have done by preparing for and holding anction 
sales in and out of town. All such have met with a fair degree of 
success, and especially the one which was held on Tuesday last, at 
which eighteen lots in block bounded by Page, Scott and Pierce 
streets, were disposed of at an aggregate of $50,140. This sale at- 
tracted some attention, because values on these streets near the Park 
were known to be moving, and it was thought that, under the im- 
petus sometimes created by bidding at auction sales, prices might 
rise another peg or two. The attendance was consequently large. 
The prices obtained were very satisfactory. For the lot on the south- 
west corner of Page and Pierce streets, 37 :6xl0G'4, the snug sura of 
$5,300 was obtained. Of four lots adjoining, fronting on the west line 
of Pierce street, each 25xl0fi:3, one suld at $2,600, two at $2,500 each, 
and one at $2,250. On Page street there were sold eight lots, each 
25x137 :G, of these five brought $2,450 each, two $2,475 each, and one 
$2,500. The southeast corner of Page and Scott streets, 37:6x106:3, 
sold for $5 325. Four lots on the east side of Scott street, each 
25x106:3, sold for $2,640, $2,500, $2,475 and $2,250 respectively. 

The general condition of the market seems to have undergone no 
change during the week. Business is not being crowded at all, and 
though one hears much of plans for the Spring and Summer, little 
definite news can be obtained. As matters stand, the apathy of the 
sellers is about equaled by that of the intending buyers. It is ad- 
mitted on all sides that San Francisco property is a good investment, 
while but few people seem to have the courage to liveop to their con- 
victions, unless they have already invested. ^Nevertheless matters 
seem to be more and more changing towards a condition of things 
which may lead to a " boom." Choice residence lots are still within 
the $3,000 limit almost all over the peninsular, and many of these are 
certain to rise to double that figure within a few years. The only 
question and difficulty lies in the fact that the city is barely far 
enough advanced in the matter of improvements to make it certain 
what is to be the ultra-fashionable quarter, what the most active re- 
tail center and what the locality where the heavy business is to be 
transacted. The neighborhood of Golden Gate Park and the Pacific 
Heights are running a race, the outcome of which is not yet plain. So 
again it is uncertain what is to be the fate of Van Ness avenue, par- 
ticularly its southern end. So again there is a question whether 
California street will remain the financial centre. Nevertheless at 
the present day, when one hears the conviction announced on all 
sides that San Francisco is bound to become a great city, when that 
conviction is being proved from day today by the almost miraculous 
spread of buildings westward and southward, it will take but little to 
start a decisive movement. And such a one may occur almos-t any 
day. 

Among the Hood of good and had bills which are before the Legis- 
lature, one in particular which deserves a prompt killing is- that 
which attempts to make the wife's consent necessary to a convey- 
ance of the community property. If made into a law, it will restrict 
the conveying of real estate severely and needlessly. It will simply 
be another trap for unwary people, and will be productive of mis- 
chief. In no State in the Onion is a wife accorded more rights than 
in California. She can secure a homestead from the husband's sep- 
arate estate, but not he from hers, her property acquired before mar- 
riage remains hers, and all that she acquires after marriage by gift, 
descent or devise, is absolutely hers, to be disposed of as she pleases. 
Nor is there any reason why real estate, as property, should occupy a 
different position in law from personalj)roperty. All that is required 
for the protection of the community is that the title appears duly of 
record. In all other respects it should be treated as merchandise, 
and its sale and purchase should be as free and as devoid of forms as 
it is possible to make it. The idea that real estate is property of a 
peculiar kind, and that its conveyance is a difficult 1;hing to en- 
compass, and that it ought to be kept so, is but a relic of the feudal 
times. Nor is such a change in the statutes necessary for the pro- 
tection of wives. When people have lived together a number of 
years sufficient to enable them to acquire real estate as community 
property, they are not apt to stand in the attitude of trying to swin- 
dle one another. That it may occur at times is no reason why such 
a sweeping and general restriction should be laid upon all community 
property. 

Another peculiar movement is that looking towards an appropria- 
tion of $250,000 for the London Exhibition. It looks exceedingly 
much as if some one is attempting to make the State pay for adver- 
tising his wares. The names of some of the men who seem to be 
urging the project are quite familiar, from their frequent recurrence 
in the public prints in connection with enterprises undertaken wittt 
public moneys. Still, inasmuch as the exhibition is to be part circus 
and part fair, they may not be out of place. However that may be. 



no Loudon exhibition will ever benefit this State to the extent oj 
$250,000. 

The re-.-ord of sales for the week is almost devoid of interest. The 
principal sale not yet recorded was that of 50x137:6 on the north side 
of Eddy street, 137:6 feet west of Taylor, for $25 500. Other sales 
were: 25x190 on the northwest side of Market street, 373 feet south- 
west of Church, $8,700; 137:6x275 on the south side of Folsora, 137:6 
feet west of Second street, $50,000, being the property belonging to 
the New York Cancer Hospital, which has been purchased by Wells, 
Fargo & Co., presumably for storing and stabling purposes; 23x57:6 
on the west side of Second street, 23 feet north of Jessie. $16,500; 
55x80 on the north corner of Brannan and Seventh streets, and 25x 
165 on the north side of Howard street, 130:11 feet east of Twelfth, 
and 206x220 on the southeast corner of Folsom and Tenth streets, 
$22,500. 

In the Western Addition there were sales of 27:6x137:6 on the 
north side of Hayes street, 137:6 feet east of Fillmore; 30x137:6 on 
the north side of Broadway, 212:6 feet east of Gough street; 47:6x 
137:6 on the north side of Broadway, 90 feet west of Buchanan street; 
50x137:6 on the north side of Fell street, 137:0 feet west of Webster; 
25x137:6 on the north side of Golden Gate avenue, 175 feet west of 
Willard street; 55x127:8 on the north side of Washington, 110 feet 
east of Devisadero; 55x81:3 on the west side of Buchanan, 82:6 feet 
south of California street; 137:6x137:6 on the southwest corner of 
Buchanan and Vallejo streets, and 37:6x137:6 on the northeast cor- 
ner of Broadway and Webster streets. 

In Mission property business is quite dull. Sales include 55x120 on 
the northwest corner of Fifteenth and Castro streets; 50x130 on the 
east side of Douglas street, 250 feet south of Twentieth street; 50:11x114 
on the north side of Twenty-second street, 254:6 feet west of Church ; 
50:11x114 on the south side of Twenty-first street, 203:7 feet west of 
Church. 

Ground is about to be broken for a four-story granite and sandstone 
building on Market street in front of the Hall of Records, to cost 
$45,000. The building is to have a frontage of fifty feet. 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon. — This celebrated Whisky is for sale by all 
first-class druggists and grocers. Trade mark — star within a shield. 

$1 A WEEK BUYS A HOME ! 

ELMORE COLONY TRACT. 

Five Acres for $75, payable $1 per week. 
Ten Acres for $150, payable $2 per week. 
Twenty Acres for $300, payable $4 per week. 
Forty Acres for $600, payable $8 per week. 

Immediate possession given upon first payment; no interest and 
no taxes until paid for in full; title United States patent; no brush 
or undergrowth upon the land; in Tehama County, opposite the 
celebrated Stanford vineyard; the cheapest land for the location in 
the State of California; was assessed this year at a fraction over $10 
per acre. 

Persons wishing to see this land should go, to Kirkwood, via Davis- 
ville, and apply to our branch office there, at KIRKWOOD, Tehama 
County, 

California Land Association, 

C. T. DENNIS, Manager, 
Or apply to this office. 

Only a little more will be sold at this price, when we propose to 
advance it to $20 per acre. 

1,000 farms for sale in all parts of the State, comprising orchards, 
vineyards, stock ranges, fruit farms, timber lands, unimproved lands, 
country homes at all kinds of prices, ranging from $100 to $100,000. 

For full information, maps, catalogues, etc., write or apply in 
person. 

THE CALIFORNIA LAND ASSOCIATION, 

634 MAEXET STREET, S. F., 
Jan. 19. t Opposite Palace Hotel. 

GEORGE GOODMAN, 

Patentee and Manufacturer of 

ARTIFICIAL STONE, 

IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 
Schillinger's Patent for Sidewalks and Garden Walks a Specialty. 
June 9-1 Office, 307 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block. S. F. 

To Architects ! 

The Directors of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society invite Architects 
to submit plans for their contemplated building at northwest corner of Mc- 
Allister and Jones streets. Particulars will be furnished by the secretary. 

San Francisco, January 12, 1889. [Jan. 19. 



Jan. 26, 188'.). 



SAN FRANCISCO NBW8 LETTER. 



19 



BIZ. 



am; i run trade <»t thla ooul \t tot beoomlng a very Important 
feature of traffic, t**tli dedduooa ..ml citrous. The latter 
ton) ripem ui January, and lha market Is rapidly filled 
1 wall Oranges oi the rery choicest descriptions. Lemons and 
Uniea are always in order the year round; the two latter, 
when not supplied (nun our own orchards, are imported— the first 
from Btoily and the second from Mexico. Bauanaa are chiefly drawn 
from Hawaii. During the year 1888, 73,061 bunches were received; 
bunches, and In the year 1886, 19.9M bunches; the 
steamer Alameda, just at hand from Honolulu, bringing L.660 
bunches. Apples from our own orchardB can be found here on sale 
the year round, and 11 happens thai as now Oregon is adding Winter 

floppies (0 our Stores, while an occasional carload in barrels is re- 
ceived here from New York or intervening States. Grapes, ay all are 
aware, art- BJOWD lure in the greatest abundance, and are utilized for 
table use. Wine and Kaisin making, and during the past season hun- 
dreds of tons Of dried Grapes were sent overland, even finding their 
way to France and Germany for wine-making, and this latter method 
of utilizing the fruit of the vine promises to be a very important 
traffic in years to come. Here comes in the query, Why do not our 
growers of choice, tine varieties of table Grapes turn their attention 
to preserving the same in their natural state by packing them in dry 
cork or redwood sawdust, kiln dried, and thus preserve them for a 
New York or Boston Wilder market, as is done now, and for twenty 
or thirty years past, iu Malaga? Grapes put up in this way are now 
selling in the Atlantic cities for 40@50c. per pound, put up in kegs 
holding fifty pounds each. It is true that an effort is now making 
here for the cold, or ice, storage of Fruits of various kinds. 

The business of shipping ripe fruits Eastward by rail is rapidly aug- 
menting year by year, and is demanding close attention by Fruit 
Gfcrowers 1 associations, as to the practicability of selling the same 
by car loads at public auction in Boston, New York, Chicago or else- 
where, instead of jobbing out the fruit as heretofore. The experi- 
ments in the line made last season proved to be satisfactory, as every 
consignment was thus closed out promptly upon arrival, and the cash 
returns immediately returned to the shipper. The canning of fruit, 
vegetables, etc., has become of vast importance in this State; thou- 
sands of cases of Apricots, Peaches, Pears, Cherries, Tomatoes, Corn, 
etc., are thus put up and find a market the world over, by reason of 
their superior quality. The drying and curing of Apples, Apricots, 
Peaches and Berries has already attained great importance, not only 
the drying and curing by steam, but sun dried. The former method 
is, of course, the most expensive, and the fruit commands a price in 
proportion, and sells readily, while the latter often, as at the present 
time, both dried peaches and apples are a drug upon the market, al- 
most unsalable. Much of the machine dried fruit, such as Apricots, 
reaches, etc., now on sale and exhibit at the several fruit growers' 
association rooms, is of the very finest quality, and attracts the atten- 
tion of all sight-seers. Figs promise to come to the fruit ere long, 
now that we have got the right kind for drying; some samples of 
which have been shown that are fully equal, if not superior, to the 
best imported. A few figures, showing the extent and rapid growth 
of California fruit shipments Eastward overland are now in order for 
the two past calendar years. 

1887. 1888. 

Canned Goods, lbs 44,2ii9,200 38,092,600 

Dried Fruit 16,204,200 20,300,300 

Ripe Fruit : 50,760,700 52,482,500 

Raisins 14,741,300 14.052,500 



Total 125,984,400 124,927,900 

The falling off in Canned Goods last year was nearly offset by in- 
creased shipments of Ripe and Dried Fruit. The quantity of Raisins 
for 1888, allowing 20 lbs. for a box, is 702,625 boxes against 737,065 
boxes in 1887. 

The raising here of Almonds, English Walnuts, Chestnuts, etc., has 
already become of considerable magnitude, and will soon far exceed 
the wants of the Pacific and add materially to the wants of Eastern 
consumers. The quality of the nuts grown here compares favorably 
with the best imported, and have already driven out all supplies from 
abroad. 

Flour exports embrace the cargo per ship J. C. Plfluger to Gal way, 
Ireland, 14,150 bbls., valued at $62,300, shipped by Starr & Co. 

Wheat clearances for Europe during the month of January promise 
to average at least thirty cargoes, if not more, but February will show 
a great falling off. We quote Spot Wheat $1.37#@$1.42# per cental. 

Lumber to Sydney: The Br. ship Collaroy, hence January 17th, 
carried 168,000 feet Lumber, 103,000 Laths, 3,989 Doors, etc., value 
$13,500. 

The Hawaiian schr. Jennie Walker, hence January 17th for Gilbert 
Island, carried 16,000 lbs. Bread and General Mdse., valued at $12,376. 

To San Bias, per schr. J. IS. Ingalls, a full cargo of General Mdse 
of the value of $32,453. 

Coal supplies from Australia promise to be large and free now that 
the miners' strikes are at an end. At last mail dates 35 vessels were 
eu route to California and more to follow. This would seem to settle 
the question of high prices for 1889. 



300 COLONY TRACTS 

.A.T AUCTIOU 



Rri(j(]sFer(jiisson&(g. 






iENERALM""^ 

'it* CALIFORNIA St SAN FRANCISCO.*' 




The Cream of Monterey County, 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 29th, 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30th, 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 31st. 

7,725 ACRES 

Of the Richest Agricultural Lands in California, 

In Tracts of from 5 to 200 Acres. 

Only three miles from Salinas, the County Seat; three and a half hours 
by rail from San Francisco, and fifteen miles from the ocean, Del Moute and 
Pacific Grove. 

Rich Alluvial Soil; Abundance of Pure Water; No Irrigation. 

A country where CROPS NEVER FAIL, and where every fruit and cereal 
grows to perfection. 

UNPARALLELED TERMS OP SALE:— One-third cash; balance 
in three equal payments, due in 2, 3 and 4 years, with interest at "}4 
per cent, per annum, less the mortgage tax, making the interest less 
than G per cent. A deposit of 10 per cent, will be required on fall Of 
the hammer. 

TITLE PERFECT "T~TITLE PERFECT I 

GRAND EXCURSION FROM SAN FRANCISCO 

TO THE 

BUENA VISTA RANCHO ! 

Train leaves the depot, corner Fourth and Towuseud streets, 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 29th, AT 8 A. m. 

Round Trip Tickets $2.50 Round Trip Tickets. 

Returning Tickets good on all regular trains to and including February lid. 

Correspondingly low rates from all intermediate points. For rates and 
time cards, see circulars aud a.l local papers. 

Tickets for sale at all S. P. Offices aud Depots. 

BRIGGS, FERGUSSON & CO., 

EEAL ESTATE AGENTS AND AUCTIONEERS, 

314 California Street, San Francisco, 

AND BY 

GASKILL & VANDERCOOK, 

458 Ninth Street, Oakland. I Jan. 26. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 26, 1889. 



VANITIES. 

mHE description of a quaint Medieval ball comes to us from Brit- 
tany. Tbe costumes were all either Moyen age or red Breton 
dresses. The young girls wore white cloth jackets embroidered 
in little Breton figures and rows of gold and silver coius on each 
side in front (symbolical in times gone by of the fortune or 
dowry of the wearer) ; plastrons of velvet embroidered in gay-colored 
silks, small lace caps worn over the smoothly dressed hair, finished 
with strings that tied on one side ; short red cloth skirts encircled with 
band of blue cloth , embroidered with little Breton figures in many-col- 
lored silks; red stockings and thick leather shoes. The young men at 
this ball wore the peasant dress also, with long hair under the Bre- 
ton cap or hat ; jackets, handsomely embroidered, velvet breeches, 
and garters with bows and ends of ribbon. The mothers and chape- 
rones wore the costume of chatelaines of the middle ages— long train- 
ed dresses, close fitting, a handsome girdle round the waist; velvet 
aumoniere suspended atone side; wide collar round the neck; long, 
tight sleeve, with long, pointed, hanging sleeve over it; on the head 
one of the long, pointed head-dresses then called " hennins." with a 
long muslin or gauze veil coming from the top of it. Old-fashioned 
dances were affected to the tune of old Breton airs, full of melody 
and simplicity, and accompanied with song. Refreshments were 
served by pages dressed in gray and blue doublets, velvet breeches 
and velvet toques with cock's or heron's feather. 



At a dinner given by the Japanese Minister in Washington, 
the other day, writes a correspondent, the menu cards were dis- 
tinctly Japanese, being fans, the sticks all traced with gilt, with, 
pretty gilt tassels. On one side the name of the guest was writ- 
ten, and on the other the menu. Among the decorations of the 
drawing room was an imperial banner — a strip of rich satin 
about a yard long, bordered with red velvet, and heavy gold 
gimp. On the satin is embroidered the national emblem— the chrys- 
santhemum— in solid gold thread on a background of green leaves, 
the whole forming the crest of the Mikado. This wonderfully exe- 
cuted piece of embroidery is fully four hundred years old, and the 
coloring is as delicate and tbe gold thread as lustrous as if it were re- 
cently made. 

Low coiffures are again fashionable. The Cadogan is a favorite 
style, and becoming to delicate faces. The hair is gathered in by a 
ribbon at the nape of the neck, thence falling in wide, looped braids, 
in curls or in a wavy mass, as be>'t suits the style of the wearer. In 
Paris, the Empress Eugenie coiffure is being revived. It consists of 
a long knot from the crown to the neck, while the front hair is parted 
in the middle, and drawn back from the temples over low rolls. 

A Watteau dance, in costume, is quite the latest society fad. One 
given recently in New York was voted decidedly the prettiest dance 
of the season. The girls were irresistible in powder, patch and pink 
brocade. The men made, for the most part, picturesque corydons, 
and even tbe servants, and the band which furnished the Arcadian 
melodies were done up a la Watleau for the occasion. 



The Louis Quatorze coat in striped satin or brocade is worn over 
lace skirts, and with either the stiff gold-embroidered waistcoat 
which corresponds with the coat, or the crossed vest of lace left open 
at the throat, and confined by a sash of crepe de chine passed twice 
around the waist under the coat and loosely knotted in front or at 
one side to fall over the lace skirts quite to the hem. 



In the way of novelties for evening comes a sash of narrow white 
satin or moirt ribbon, tied military fashion over one shoulder, but 
knotted high up under the arm instead of at the waist. The severe 
line across the bust is broken by a drooping cluster of flowers, fast- 
ened to the ribbon, and the effect is graceful and becoming to a slen- 
der figure. 

Fur is used for everything. It Ijrims hats, gowns, wraps, gloves 
and tea-gowns alike. Fur rugs are made as portieres, and a fashion- 
able New Yorker introduced this latest fad in Gotham at one of her 
" five o'clocks," where the guests pushed aside a superb Bengal tiger 
skin which hung before the entrance to the tea room. 

Directoire coats, with gradated capes and immense pockets, are 
worn by young girls. The capes are trimmed with rows of narrow 
ribbon, and a double row of large buttons down the front. The wide, 
flowing sleeves are also trimmed with the ribbon, and the large pock- 
ets are embellished with buttons. 



At a fashionable London wedding the twelve bridesmaids carried 
the Incroyable canes, to which were attached, by white satin ribbon, 
an immense bouquet of yellow roses. 

Corduroy is combined with seige, cashmere, camels'-hair and cloth, 
and is one of tbe most fashionable materials for late Winter and 
early Spring wear. 



IVORY AND GOLD. 

I plucked you in the August noon, 

When all the hills were hazy 
With mists that shimmered to the croon 

Of doves — belated daisy. 
You grew alone; the orchard's green, 

Which May and June bad whitened, 
Save for your modest bloom was e'en 

Content to go unbrightened. 
For this, the one I love, at last. 

With countless charming graces, 
Upon her bosom made you fast 

Amid the folded laces. 
You had not dreamed that you would rest — 

What thought could so embolden? — 
Above the treasures of a breast 

So white, a heart so golden. 

— Charles Henry Luders. 



An Opinion that is an Opinion. — A daily contemporary gives 
its readers the benefit of the following weighty opinion (which is 
fully worth the space it occupies) of Alfred Fuhrman, who is a well- 
known German-American citizen, and Secretary of the Federated 
Trades Council. He says: "lam heartily glad this Samoan affair 
has turned up. All of the islands of the Pacific are the rightful 
property of the United States, and I think this country is in a posi- 
tion to maintain its rights. Why, I think we could go down there on 
the water front and get enough sailors to drive those Dutchmen out 
of Samoa, and it ought to be done. If the United States were to put 
forth all her magnificent resources, you would quickly see how she 
would be recognized as the first country in the world." More power 
to the fellow's elbow ! May his capacity for spread-eagle sarcasm 
never grow less ! 

ijsTsxria-A-iNroji!. 




Greek bands, shell, gold and silver ornameuts, wreaths of flowers 
and elaborately jeweled pins are all seen on coiffures for the ball room 
or the opera. 



Insurance Company 

CAPITAL $1,000,000, 1 ASSETS $2,260,000. 

D. J. STAPLES, President. I WILLIAM J. DDTTON, Secretary. 

ALPHEU3 BULL, Vice-President. | B. FAYMONVILLE, Ass't Secretary. 

Agents in all prominent localities throughout the United S tates. [Aug. 25. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

ORGANIZED 1864. 
Principal Office 276 Sansome Street 

FIRE INSURANCE. 
Capital Paid Up in U. S. Gold Coin $300,000.00 

Losses p'd since organi'n.$2,667,366. 43 I Reinsurance Reserve ...$ 230,330.36 

Assets January 1, 1888 816,627.14 NetSurphis(overev'ryth'g) 277,S)63.78 

Surplus for policyholders.. 808,294.14 | Income in 1887 354,683.66 

OFFICERS: 

J.T. HOUGHTON... President 1 CHAS. R.STORY ...Secretary 

J. L. N. SHEPARD,. . .Vice-President I R. H. MAGILL General Agent 

Directors of the Home Mutual Insurance Co. — L. L. Baker, H. L. Dodge, 
J. L. N. Shepard Johc Curry, J. F. Houghton, John Sinclair, C. Waterhouse 
Chauncey Taylor, S. Huff, C. T. Ryland, A. K. P. Harmon. [March 3. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class Companies, or Grain sold, if 
desired, at current rates. 

Office of the Company, 412 FINE ST., San Francisco, Cal. fNov. 19. 

AG6RE6ATE ASSETS, $46,000,000- 

London Assurance Corporation of London [Established by Royal 

Charter 1720.] 
Northern Assurance Company of London [Established 1836.] 
Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool [Established 1867.] 
Connecticut Fire Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 
S. E. Cor. California and Montgomery Streets. Safe Deposit Building. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London arid Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000, 000 

Reserve Fund (in addition to Capital) 2,125,000 

Total Assets July 1, 1SS7 6,809,629 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 
July 16.] 305 California Street, San Francisco, 



Jan. 26. 18S9. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 



•NEWS LETTER" POSTSCRIPTS. 

" I don't see in/thing ao Infernally funny about thai I " said ; 
throwing down •» oopj of ftidb. 

" Whatfi that, <lt-:ir'.' " Inquired the wife. 

" Why. thb Item hare, In which the managing editor tells an an 
Ui o n— Lhal ha La arrcnglnt •• ■ym po a l n i n on the subject, ' is Uar- 
rlaga n Pall ore ' ' and »*k* her if aba would like to contribute. " 

■■ v. - ' Wall, wli.it .lues she say, <lear?" 

■• Why , lhal she has been married just a year, and " will contribute 
a photograph of JQsl the sweetest, prettiest baby you ever set your 
eyes on." 

"And you don't think that is funny T " 

" No, Indeed.*' 

*■ Well. I think it is real cute, and just too sweet for anything." 

" Hut it is neither Logical nor funny. The idea "f the baby proving 
marring" not to be a failure! Absurd ! She could have got the baby 
without being married, couldn't she? " 

u Oh ( Bam I you horrid wretch I Men's jokes are so brutal ! Don't 
speak so loud, or our darling in his trundle bed will hear you." 

Contributor—" Hello. Mr. Kditor! Good morning. 11 
Editor— " It is not a good morning. It is a bad morning." 

Contributor—* 1 But the sun is shining brightly, and the" 

Kditor—" But it is not shining brightly in here. This is my busy 
day. and I have spent ten minutes trying to straighten out some 

manuscript that some d d fool of a contributor sent in rolled, and 

now it won't lie still, but goes squirming over ray desk like so many 
electric eels, lam mad enough; but just wait till the compositor 
tries to make it lie still on his case. The printers will kill that con- 
tributor some time, and I don't give a d n, except to pay his fu- 
neral expenses." 

"O ma! " " What is it my darling boy? " 
■• My stomach aches so." 

" Well, I guess you've got cold in it. I'll make a mustard plaster 
for it." 
" But I don't want that. It will make it worse, instead of better." 
" Why so?" 
" Because it would go against my stomach, you see." 

" Ma, what is a nocturne?" 

" Why, Kdith, a nocturne is a poem which" 

" Poem nothing ! " exclaimed the bad little brother. "If you want 
a real A 1 definition of the word, just go in the parlor and see the 
pile of pieces where the cat knocked the urn off the mantel-piece. 
That's the kind of a knocked urn that is! " 



SUNBEAMS. 

Guest (at an evening party, to bashful young man) — You 

may order me an ice, waiter. Supposed Waiter (fiercely) — Sir! 
I'm no waiter, sir. and such a mistake demands an apology, sir! 
Guest (covered with confusion)— Why of course itdoes. Where d'ye 
suppose 1 can find the waiter? — Life. 

Daughter— But mamma, I would rather be a young man's 

slave than an old man's darling. Mamma— My child I was an old 
man's darling. Take my advice and follow my example. The other 
will come in the course of time. — Cartoon. 

— We all get the wives that were intended for us, says a social 
philosopher. He will allow us to remark, however, that the man who 
elopes with another man's wife gets the wife that was'nt intended for 
him. — Boston Courier. 

"I dont say marriage is a failure," said Adam, candidly, as he 

sat down on a log just outside the Garden of Eden, and looked hun- 
grily at the fruit on the other side of the wall, "but if I had remained 
single this would't have happened." — Pecks Sun. 

The phonograph is the most polite machine in the world. It 

receives long speeches without a murmur and with no signs of being 
bored, and acrank can make it talk. — New York News. 

Tom (enthusiastic)— Sweet little girl, Ethel! I never heard her 

say a mean thing about anyone! Maud (viciously)— Neither did I. 
I never heard her talk about any-one, except herself '.— Town Topics. 

"The trouble with pa," said Mrs. Bently/'is that he lets lit- 
tle things worry him. He was mad this morning because the baby 
kept him awake all night." — Exchange. 

Milkman— Did you wish to settle for your last month's milk? 

Housewife — Not to-day. I guess you have to chalk it as you usually 
do. — Exchange. 

Old Gent— "Do you go 'round much of nights?" Young Gent 

— "No more than I can help. I try to go as straight as I am able." 

— Washington Post. 

A — The crop of young doctors in New York is going to be very 

large this year. B— Yes, but what will the harvest be? 

— Texas Sif tings. 

When one is trying to write a letter on a half sheet of paper 

much may be said on both sides. — New York Journal. 

Hotel-keepers receive more suite notes than any other class of 

men in creation. --New York Journal. 

Principal— What part of speech is kiss? Chorus of Normal 

School Giris— A conjunction. — Exchange. 



IIDTSTJ'IR.A.ICTCE. 



GEOKtiK L. BRANDER, 

President. 



THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871. j 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up 1400.000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE ... 218 AND 270 MNSUML SIHttI, 

San Francisco, California. 

CHA8. H. CUSHINO, P. J. WHITS, 

Secretary. Viet'- President. 

Board or Dirkctoks— Ii. (allaghau, P. J. White. J. M. Donahue, QKO. 

L. Brauder, E. L. Goldstein, U Ganulnghua, M. Kane, Fisher Ajnea, l»r. 

C. F. Buckley. Dr. Win. Jones, G. H. Wheatou, T. MoMulliu, II. II. Watunn, 

H. Dimoud, P. Boland. |8opt. 1. 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

CAPITAL. Paid In Full I 200.000.00 

ASSETS. December 31. 1887 434.194.76 

LOSSES Paid Since Company was Organized 1 .846.704.24 

JOHN H. WISE, President. 
CHA8. A. Laton, Secretary. 

Principal Office 439 California Street, 

(8afe Deposit Building). [March 10.] San Francisco, Cal. 

THE SOUTH BRITISH 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW ZEALAND. 

CAPITAL $1 0.000,0 

Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

Office— 213 and 215 Sansome Street San Francisco. 

A. S. MURRAY, Manager. 

London Office— No. 2 Royal Exchange Avenue, Cornhtll, E. C. [March 5. 



PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $9,260,000 

Cash Assets 2,764,876 

Cash Assets In United States 1,398,646 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

GENERAL AGENTS, 
316 California Street. San Francisco. March 20. 

AN6L0-NEVADA ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

FIRE AND MARINE.— Capital, Fullv paid, $2,000,000. 
OFFICE, 410 PINE STREET. 

BANKERS: THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

[8ept. 10.1 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 



CAPITAL 



Nov. 18 ] 



..$5,000,000 



AGENTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

No. 316 California Street, San Francisco. 



Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1782.] 
American Fire Insurance Co. of New York [Estab. 1857.] 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
July 16.1 413 California Street, San Francisco. 



THE EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY, 

Assets i 8 , 4 Al 8 A°A 



Surplus- 



$18,104,255 



This Society pays about Ave million dollars annually to the widows and 
orphans of deceased policy-holders. 

NOBTH & SNOW, Managers for Pacific Coast, 
q C [ 27 1 405 Montgomery Street, 8. F. 



THE SWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

SWITZERLAND of Zurich— Capital, 5,000,000 Francs. HELVETIA of St. 
Gall— Caoital 10 000,000 Francs. BALOI8E of Basle-Capital. 5,000,000 FrancB. 
These three companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that 
mav be sustained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the 
world In the settlement of all claims under an English policy, these com- 
nnnic^ will strictly adhere to the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds' 
End submit to English jurisdiction. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 410 California 
street. San Francisco. [June 9.] 



THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

CAPITAL $10,000,000. 

W. J. CALLINGHAM '. General Agent, 

420 California Street, uos Francisco, Cal. [March 19. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 26, 1889. 



LIBRARY TABLE. 

"The Chinese and the Chinese Question" is a paper-covered 
book of 200 pages, which gives a lot of opinion and information on 
the question vexing the nation, or at least the Pacific Coast portion 
of it at the present time. It is from the pen of James A. Whitney, 
LL.D., and has reached a second edition. " The two races have met, 
and one or the other must give way," says the author. " The Chi- 
nese must recoil to his own lana", or we must recede from ours. The 
two races will not mingle. They cannot fuse. The Pacific Coast at 
an early day, and our entire country at a remoter time, must be the 
inheritance of the Caucasian, or it must be the heritage of the Chi- 
nese." Tibbals Book Company, New York, are the publishers. 

" Vick's Floral Guide for 1889" has a large lot of information about 
seeds, plants, fiowers, and so forth, with hundreds of black-and-white 
illustrations and several full-page ones in various colors. James 
Vick, Rochester, N. Y., is the publisher, 

Mrs. Lee C. Harby promises to be the next literary pet. She has 
all the necessary qualifications, according to present demands, as she 
is first of all a Southerner, and also an exceptionally beautiful woman, 
with the correct chestnut glow to her masses of hair, and a pair of 
starry eyes. Mrs. Harby does not belong, however, to the fleshly 
and erotic school. She has written some really charming verse, and 
" The City of a Prince," which appeared in Mrs. Martha J. Lamb's 
Magazine of American Sistory won her a fellowship in the American 
Historical Association. The Century has taken up Mrs. Harby, and 
during a recent visit to New York she was made much of by the 
upper literary crust of Gotham. 



A SAN FRANCISCO BLIZZARD. 
Blizzards and cyclones are unknown on the Pacific Coast, ex- 
cepting in so far as they may occur in a trade channel now and then. 
One ot these is agitating San Francisco at the present time. Its rise 
is noted at the famous Publishers' Book Store, 834 Market street, and 
its force is experienced wherever the desire for good books at mar- 
velously low prices is felt; There has been a change of firm there 
lately, the successors to the book and stationery business being 
Clark & Spengler, both enterprising young men, who have been with 
Belford, Clark & Co. six or seven years, and to whom selling books is 
second nature. It is their intention to sell books cheaper than they 
have ever been sold previously on this coast, and the manner in 
which the public are meeting their intentions would indicate that 
they will succeed in that undertaking. Those who wish standard 
works in nice, rich bindings will find bargains in them here, while 
those others who have a strong taste for the current literature of the 
day, in attractive or cheap bindings, of a durable or an ephemeral 
nature, will also find here the means to satisfy their wants. Clark & 
Spengler do not propose to have any shop-worn goods on their 
shelves, even if they are obliged to sell certain lines of them at a loss, 
and those who wish to stock up their libraries will do well to brush 
up their ideas by making a call at 834 Market street, and looking over 
the magmficeut stock of goods. 



It is both strange and ludicrous that, in the society which hundreds 
of wealthy and well-educated persons are clamoring to enter, there 
should be members who cannot be trusted in a crowded parlor, writes 
a correspondent in the Philadelphia Times. That men who look down 
upon ordinary mortals as dross should be suspected of carrying off 
loose articles of value is a state of affairs which the every-day com- 
prehension finds it difficult to master. Yet it is true. Else why was 
it that Mr. Cornelius Vanderbilt found it necessary to have no less 
than three detectives disguised as gentlemen at his recent reception 
to the Rev. Dr. David W. W. Greer? Here was an affair at which 
the host ought to have felt secure of his guests if ever there was one 
in New York. It was a reception given in honor of a new rector of 
St. Bartholomew's Church, that very high-toned place of worship, 
and only gentlemen were invited. It is fair to say that Mr. Vander- 
bilt, who is a conservative man in society as elsewhere, did not go 
outside of the list of his own acquaintances, and surely a great mil- 
lionaire could hardly be suspected of knowing a blackleg! 
1_ — _ — - ■ - ■» 

Champagne and Nine-Pins.— In order to meet the desires of 
some members of one of our leading clubs, it has been decided to es- 
tablish a bowling-alley adjoining the club rooms. The novel feature 
in this departure will be that the pins are manufactured of California 
oak and will resemble in appearance Pommery Sec bottles, and the 
monogram of this swell wine will be reproduced on the pins. The 
club will present the best player at the end of the year with a case of 
Pommery Sec. 

A meeting will be held at B'uai B'rith Hall, Tuesday evening, Jan- 
uary 29, 1889, at 8 o'clock, to participate in the formation of an 
electrical society, the purpose of which will be the further advance- 
ment of its members in the various branches of the science of elec- 
tricity by means of lectures, etc. Wm. W. Wight, H. S. Hindo, S. J. 
Stillwell, P. B. Brown, P. E. Cullinan and J. "W. Chute form the 
committee appointed to call the meeting of those interested. 



Those who witnessed the debut of Lizzie Richardson at Byron 
Mauzy's piano rooms last Monday are enthusiastic in praise of the 
methods of instruction of the the young lady's teacher, Julia Mel- 
ville-Snyder, as manifested in the elocution, singing and carriage of 
the fair debutante. 



REMEMBER THIS: 

The suits, overcoats and other* goods we display 
in ourwindows are marked in plain figures, and 
in every ease represent full lines of the same 
goods in all sizes thatwe have in stock and on sale 
in our store. We send our fag ends to the auc- 
tioneer instead of using them for " bait." In our 
Overcoat and Suit Departments we have a stock 
that for variety,exeellenee and magnitude is un- 
surpassed in the United States. We have our 
goods made to our special order and take pride in 
them and in giving our customers the greatest 
value for their money. 

M. J. Flavin & Co., 

924 TO 928 IMZA-KIKIIET STSBBT, 

THROUGH TO ELLIS. 

Largest Handlers of Fine Suits and Overcoats on Pacific Coast. 

P. O. Box 1,996. [Jan. 26. 



"PIONEER CARPET HOUSE." 
Importer and Dealer in Carpets, Wall Paper, Shades, Etc., 

820 Market, and 17, 19 and 21 O'Farrell Streets. 

Is now moving to commodious new quarters, STARR KING BUILDING, 123 

Geary Street. 

Telephone 3028. [Jan. 26. 

TO SHIPPERS. 

Notice published in this paper January 15th, advising shippers that the 
Southern Pacific Company would on the 24th inst. withdraw from through 
rates East-bound to Cincinnati, Detroit, Pittsburg, Buffalo aud points com- 
mon therewith; and to New York, Boston, Baltimore, Philadelphia and 
points common with each by all routes except via New Orleans, is hereby 
canceled. Freight for above named points will be received aud contracted 
as heretofore. 

J. C. STUBBS, .RICHARD URAY, 

Gen'l Traffic Manager, Gea'l Freight Ag't. 

Southern Pacific Company, Pacific System. [Jan, 26. 

MacCabe & Co., 

Zincographers, Designers, Photo Engravers and Process Printers, 

All the new Photo Relief processes and regular Relief Zincos. The best 
machinery applicable to the business. Particular attention paid to Real 
Estate Maps, Charts, Diagrams of Buildings, Portraits and Advertising 



MacCabe & Co., 



Jan. 26.] 



677 Merchant Street. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 



H O 3VC IE, 
LOCATED 



A. CJTJIBT 
CENTRALLY 

FORTHOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION. 
April 7.1 WM. B. HOOPER, Manager. 



FINE TABLE @o' 
WINES ^ 



FROM our 

CELEBRATED ORLEANS 
VINEYARD. 





Chamyagne 
530 Washington ii 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



T7 OR Social Gatherin gs, whether 

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Eclipse ChampagnE 

Its Delightful Taste, Delicate Fla- 
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lovers of Good Wine. But its crown- 
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nor Alcoh ol added to it, and therefore 
even its freest us e never leaves one 
with a headache. 



Jan. 98, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



POT POURRI. 



MISS MADGE. 
Your obeaka won a-gloving with roses, 

Ym.?r hnir was u ripple of gold; 
Away with the pain lliat dlqclp90fl 

The love that 1 bore you of old. 
You taught me to whirl to the measure 

of walUea and schottlchta, too. 
The knowledge hu given me pleasure, 

Mfafl Madge, and I owe it to you. 
With fingers as light as a fairy, 

You thrummed on the ivory keys. 
With UailiiuiL'e, blithesome and airy, 

Y'ou taught me to be at my ease, 
And join in your melody, ringing 

And thrilling my heart through and through, 
So now I am lauded for singing, 

Miss Miulge, and I owe it to you. 
A worldly-wise beauty of twenty, 

Who many a conquest had seen; 
Of lovers you surely had plenty- 
Why toy with a lad of eighteen? 
Your manner, bewitching and artless, 

Ensnared me for aye, as you knew; 
And now I am bitter and heartless, 

Miss Madge, and 1 owe it to you, 

— Boston Transcript. 

CATCHING A DIMPLE. 

The roses kissed her shadow, 

The zephyrs blither blew, 
And the little grasses quivered 

As they touched her dainty shoe; 
The branches bent to greet her, 
While the rillets ran to meet her. 
And the Summer morn was sweeter 

As she tripped along the dew. 
She stooped and plucked a daisy 

To bind amid her hair, 
And I seemed to see it laughing 

With the rapture to be there. 
Xo fairer nymph Apollo 
Ever chased o'er hill and hollow; 
And I could not choose but follow, 

Though she led me to despair. 
With waning hope to win her, 

And many a fear to miss, • 
I traced her little footsteps 

Along the road to bliss'. 
But love ne'er wins by weeping, 
So when, with pulses leaping, 
I saw a dimple peeping, 

I caught it with a kiss. — Samuel Minturn Peck. 

KISMET. 
A windy sunset flared against the west, 

Just as it did in those dear days of old, 
And through the paths that once our feet knew best, 

Together, silently, we strolled. 
Far, far away, were restless bells that cast 

Out on the air a faint, familiar chime, 
As dreamily as when we heard it last 

In that sweet, unforgotten time. 
Then all the tender things of by-gone years 

Rose to our lips and trembled there unsaid; 
Our eyes were blurred with vague, uncertain tears, 

For in our hearts lay Love, long dead. — Exchange. 

WHEN SHE COMES HOME. 

When she comes home again ! A thousand ways 

I fashion to myself the tenderness 

Of my glad welcome : I shall tremble — yes ; 

And touch her, as when first in the old day's 
I touched her girlish band, nor dared upraise 

Mine eyes, such was my faint heart's sweet distress : 

Then silence : And the perfume of her dress : 

The room will sway a little, and a haze 
Cloy eyesight — soulsight even — for a space : 
And tears — yes ; and the ache here in the throat, 

To know that I so ill deserve the place . i 
Her arm makes for me ; and the sobbing note 

I stay with kisses, ere the tearful face 

Again is hidden in the old embrace. — CenUtry. 

FALSE KISSES. 
Love came. I took him on my knee; 
He stood tiptoe mine eyes to see; 
He kissed mine eyes— could falser be? 
His mirrored self he kissed — not me ! 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

CAPITAL PAID UP ^"^^^^^^ S 2,500,000 

RESERVE FUND 500,000 

Southeast corner California and Sansoma Streota. 
Head Office— 28 OORNHILL, London. 

Branches— Portland, 0.; Victoria, British Columbia. 

Sub-Branchos— New Westminster, Vancouver. Nanalmo and Kamloops, British 
Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts oi the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upou its Head OtlU'e slid Branches, and upon Its Agents, as follows- 

NEW YOKK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bauk; SCOTLAND— British Liucn Company IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank 
of Mexico and South America: CHINA and JAPAN— Chartered Bauk of 
India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Bauklng Company of Sydney, English, Scottish and 
Australian Chartered Bauk and National Bank of Australasia; DEMERARA 
and TRINIDAD (West Iudies)-Colonial Bank. [March U. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIaTIsAN FRANCISCoT 

Capital $3,000,000 

WM. ALVORD, President. 
Thomas Brown Cashier | B. Murray, Jr ,. .Assistant Cashier 

AQENT8: 

NEW YORK— Agency of the Bank of California; BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bank; CHICAGO— Union National Bank; 8T. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Saving Bank ; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent 
in Loudon— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Correspondents in India, 
China, Japan and Australia. 

The Bauk has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents In all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louie, New Orleans, Denver. Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland, O., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Frankfort-ou-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, 
Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities In Italy and Switzerland. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 

] ESTABLISHED IN 1870.J 
UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY. 

CAPITAL STOCK PAID UP $1,500,000 

SURPLUS - $300,000 

UNDIVIDED PROFITS 162,974— 452,974 

DIRECTORS : 

S. G. Murphy, James Moffitt, D. Callaghan, Geo. A. Low, James M. Douahue, 

James D. Phelau, N. Van Bergen, Jas. H. Jennings, J. A. Hooper. 

President S. G. MURPHY I Cashier E. D. MORGAN 

Vice-President . .JAMES MOFFITT | Ass't Cashier. .. . GEO. W. KLINE 
Transacts ageneral banking business. Issues Commercial and Travelers' 
Credits. Buys and Sells Exchange on London, Dublin, Paris, the principal 
cities of Germany and the United States. Collections made and prompt 
returns rendered at market rates of exchange. [Sept. 8. 

LONDON, PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. W. Cor. Sansome-and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 \ Paid Up Capital '. $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $250,000, 

Head Office 9 and 10, Tokenhouse Yard, Lothbury, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.), 46 Exchange Place. PARIS— MessrB. Lazard Freres <fcCie, 17 Boulevard 
Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Commercial 
and Travelers' Credits issued. DAVID CAHN, \ W on«i»™ 

EUGENE MEYER, ( Mana g ers - 
C. Altschtjl, Cashier. [March 26. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

Agency at New Yobk 62 Wall Street 

AGENCY AT VlEGINIA, NEVADA. 

London Bankers Union Bank of London (Limitedl 

DIRECTORS: 

JAMES G. FAIR. JAS. L. FLOOD, JNO. W. MAOKAY 

A. E. DAVIS, JOHN P. BIGELOW. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK. Limited. 

Capital and Reserve, $2,375,000. 

San Francisco Office, 424 California St. I London Office 22 Old Broad St. 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, William Steel. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. Juno 9. 

WELLS, FARGO & COMPANY — BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $4,894,805.04 

DIRECTORS: 

Lloyd Tevis, President: Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Chas. F. Crocker. J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris, Geo. E. Gray 
and W. F. Goad. H. Wadsworth, Cashier. 

Receive Deposits, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Banking 
Business. [ Au S- 6- 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS fcETTER. 



Jan. 26, 1889. 



THE NEW SOUTH. 

Certain of our illy-informed daily contemporaries are constantly 
sighing for a new 8outh that shall be as vigorous and as prosperous 
as the North. They do not seem to have the faintest idea of just how 
vigorous and prosperous the South really is. They appear to think 
that because they supply but little news about that section of our 
common country, there is nothing happening in it worth recording. 
If any Southern happenings are selected for editorial comments, they 
are only those about which it is possible to say something unpleasant. 
All other matters are as studiously avoided as if they concerned only 
another world. There are few parts, of the earth about whose com- 
mercial status the average Northern man is not more fully and cor- 
rectly informed than he is in regard to the material development and 
industrial progress of the South. It will be remembered that when 
the census was taken in 1880, great was the astonishment at the fig- 
ures. The idea had been firmly implanted in the Northern mind that 
the South was falling behind in the matter of population, and that it 
would lose a part of its Congressional representation in consequence. 
When the census showed that the South had more than kept pace 
with the rest of the country, and that, instead of losing.it had gained 
representatives, there was a disinclination at first to accept the figures 
as reliable. Even so well informed a man as Senator Edmunds de- 
clined to believe them true, and not until the census of South Caro- 
lina was taken a third time, and by a marshal of his own choosing, 
was he convinced. During the late election campaign the accepted 
idea of the North was that the South favored free trade because it 
it had no industries to protect. We venture the assertion that that 
idea still possesses the minds of all too many of our people. It is ut- 
terly erroneous nevertheless. The fact is that industrial develop- 
ment is proceeding at the South at a rate that has no parallel in the 
history of the country. The Baltimore Manufacturer's Guide, a pains- 
taking and reliable journal, has just published statistics from which 
we learn that during 1888 no fewer than 3,618 new manufacturing en- 
terprises were started in the South against 3,430 in 1887, and 1,575 in 
1886, or a total of 8,623 during the three years. The amount of capital 
in, or to be paid in on call as required, for these new undertakings 
during the past year alone amounts to the astonishing sum of $168,- 
801,000. The figures show that this remarkable progress is not con- 
fined to one locality, but pervades the entire South. Every State has 
shared in the grand development. It is significant that the new en- 
terprises embrace among their number almost every branch of indus- 
try known in the North. Since 1880, 20.000 miles of railroad have 
been built, and $700,000,000 have been expended in improving old and 
building new roads. In 1880 the South produced but 397,301 tons of 
pig iron, while during the present year it will produce 1,800,000 tons. 
In 1880 it mined 6,048,571 tons of coal, while in 1887 its total output 
had increased to 16,476,785 tons. The manufacture of cotton goods, 
which in 1880 amounted to $21,000,000, had reached $50,000,000 last 
year. But the most significant fact of all is the steady transfer of 
capital and plant from the North to the South. It was begun by 
lumbermen and furnace owners, and for a time attracted no atten- 
tion. But now not a week passes without notices of these transfers. 
Railroad car and machine shops, implement and carriage and wagon 
factories, stove foundries, and- many other large industrial establish- 
ments have been removed to the South because their owners found 
that they could no longer compete at their old locations against the 
cheap lumber and iron and other advantages enjoyed by Southern 
manufacturers. These transfers are of daily occurrence and yet 
they represent only the first waves of a tide whose inflow will 
cover the entire section, carrying on its bosom every form of manu- 
facturing industry. Immigration of skilled workmen is going on 
apace. Wherever these people have settled they have made their 
impress upon the community, for by their intelligence, their capacity 
to do things, their self-respect and their domesticity, they have un- 
consciously shown what is meant by " the dignity of labor." Mani- 
festly the South is all right. 

It is a fact not denied by even the best friends of the Haytians,says 
the Pittsburg Despatch, that Voodoo worship and cannibalism are 
practiced openly in all parts of the island, and horrible orgies, the 
occasion of unutterable excesses, are*held under the auspices of Voo- 
doo priests and priestesses — savage rites at which dozens of human 
victims are sacrificed at a time. The masses of the people are wofully 
unintelligent and ignorant, deeply tainted with fetich worship, and, 
although it is true that fetich dances were forbidden by a decree, it is 
also true that that decree has been since repealed, and high otficers 
of the Goverment now attend these meetings to distribute money and 
applaud the most frantic immoralities. Despite all denials on the 
part of Minister Preston, the representative of the Haytian Govern- 
ment at Washington, and all other people who, for one reason or 
another, strenuously deny that the practice of fetich worship and of 
cannibalism are characteristic of life in the Black Republic, all that 
has been stated above, and much more that might be stated, can be 
established by an appeal to unimpeachable authorities. 

A free excursion from San Fraucisco, Sacrameato, Stocktoa, Sau Jose 
aud Los Angeles to Fresno on the 6th, 7th and 8th days of February, to at- 
tend the credit auction sale of the Perriu Colony, con sistiug of five thou- 
sand acres in twenty-acre lots, with water, and ten thousand acres for in- 
vestment. Fare will be returned to all purchasers. Maps, circulars and 
full particulars cau be obtained of C. H. Street & Co., 415 Montgomery 
street, S. F. 



B^-isTIKS- 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 California Street, San Francisco. 
CAPITAL $800,000. 

Officers— President, L. GOTTIG;Vice-PreBident, FRED. ROEDING; Cash- 
ier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT; Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN. Board of 
Directors— L. Gottig, Fred. Roeding, Chas. Meinecke, Edw. Kruse, George H 
Eggers, N. Van Bergen, Ign. Steinhart, O. Schoemann. Secretary, Geo 
Tourny. Attorneys, Jabboe, Harrison and Goodfellow. [Dec 1 



THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

822 PINE STREET. 
PAID-UP CAPITAL tl.000.000. 

DIRECTORS : 
CHAS. F. CROCKER, | E. H. MILLER, Jb. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH Pbesideht. 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashier. 

[Oct. 23.1 



SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

Guarantee Capital $300000 

OFFICERS: 

President JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary 8. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-President W. S. JONES I Attorney. SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. Aug. 22. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, Limited. ~ 

N. E. Corner Sansome and Pine Streets. 

LONDON OFFICE— S Angel Court. 
NEW YORK CORRESPONDENT— J. W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL STOCK, $6,000,000. 
Will receive deposits, open accounts, make collections, buy and sell 
exchange and bullion, loan money and issue letters of credit available 
throughout the world. FRED. F. LOW. I „.„„„„. 

IGN. STEINHART, ( Managers. 
P. N. Lilibnthal, Cashier. [March 26. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 18 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President. | ERNST BRAND Secretary. 

LOANS AT LOW RATES. rPee. 29. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Utah Consolidated 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the Company, room 23, Nevada 
Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California, on 
Wednesday, the thirtieth (30th) day of January, 1 889, at the hour of 1 o'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensui ng year 
and the transaction of such other business as may come before the meeting. 
Transfer books will close on Saturday, January twenty-sixth (26th), at 12 
o'clock M. 

A. H. FISH, Secretary. 

Office— Room 23, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. [Jan. 19. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Belcher Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Belcher Silver 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the Company, room 8, No. 
327 Pine street, San Francisco, California, on 

Tuesday, the 29th day of January, 1889, at 1 o'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, aud the transaction of such other business as may properly come be- 
fore the meeting. Transfer books will close on Saturday, January 26tb, at 12 
o'clock m. JNO. CROCKETT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 8, No. 327 Pine street, Stock Exchange Building, San 
Francisco, California. [Jan. 19. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Hibernla Savings and Loan Society, 

N. E. Corner Montgomery and Post Sts., 

San Francisco, January 2, 1889. 
. At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of 4>£ per cent, per annum on 
all deposits for the six months ending December 31, 1888, free of all taxes, 
and payable from aud after this date. 
Jau. 5. 1 ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company. 

Dividend No. 12 (Thirty Cents per share) of the Hawaiian Commercial 
and Sugar Company, will be payable on and after FRIDAY, Ffbruary 
1 1889, at the office of the Company, 327 Market street. Transfer books will 
close Friday, January 25th, at 3 p. m. 

Jan. 12.1 B. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



Hakalau Plantation Company. 
Dividend No. 30 (One Dollar per share) of the Hakalau Plantation Com- 
pany is now payable at the office of the Company, 327 Market street. 
Jau. 26.J E. H. SHELDON. Secretary. 



Jan. 26, 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTER. 



26 



DETERIORATION OF CAUFORNIA CROOKS. 
"Numerous reports of roeak thievery are reoelTed at Chief 
rod thai • onmber ol Beetero crooks an 
atlui! in IhU oily." per. 

■ ley «y« tint nn expert poroh ellmber i* nt work in the olty. 
Th»- poreta ollmbet li ompbatletllj an Kuiern produotioa. The one n ho ti 
oponttog mt prennt neatly plans all hla robberlee* end no olue whatever 

haa bt*eu obtained *.« to hla Motility EU Uj QDdOllbtedly from the Buft." 

Dally I 
tpedi are alarmingly aameroiu iu remote aud lonely localities. 
K\.r> f.-w nlffhta briiifs the newa <*f a rresh robbery by these genUemeuof 
the highway. Chlel C the opinion that the robbers arc Eastern 

■rooks." —Daily Papt r. 

■' rhe landlady of the boarding bouse at 13,399 Ellis street had her Jewels 
carried off but Wednesday by one ol her boarders, who gave bis nam.' as 
Mickey Welch. Welch has decamped. 1 be police know nothing u to hla 
whereabonta, and at police headquarters it Is believed that be has practiced 
the same game In several Eastern oltlea. it is believed that lie lla^ not bceu 
■ loui: iu the State." —Daily Paper. 

"A dog thief Is causing considerable uneasiness to the owners of flue 
omnlnes In the Western Addition. Chief Crowley a men have not been 
able t" detect the rascal He la thought to bo a recent Eastern Importa- 
tion.*' — Daily Paper. 

These are but fair samples of what the police reports of the daily 
papers have teemed with during the past two months. Hardly a day 
bat what some crime is committed worthy of mention in the 
columns of the dailies, and the perpetrators of which escape arrest. 
It is the common practice of Chief Crowley to ascribe these offenses 
to the ■• Eastern crooks " who, in his mind, are always hovering in 
the city. This would naturally lead to the inference that the Cali- 
fornia crook is only a blundering mechanic in the performance of his 
larcenous designs, while his brother in the East is an expert. Chief 
Crowley should reform his mode of expression, or, what would be 
better, he should reform bis police force. His constant preference 
for the " Eastern croofc " in explaining away mysterious crimes is 
causing not a little merriment among his subordinates, and, more- 
over, is calculated to belittle the ^tate in the eyes of the effete East. 
Time was when the California crook was deemed second to none in 
the estimation of the American police authorities— a reputation which 
"Colonel" HI tick Hart, as one Eastern paper dubs him, has done 
much to maintain. We are loth to believe, even at the implied sug- 
gestions of so able a man as Patrick Crowley, that the era of deteri- 
oration has set in. 

Not long ago this same man Crowley had himself interviewed 
whether it were possible for a second " Jack-the-Kipper " to plan and 
execute in San Francisco a series of murders and mutilations like 
those done by the Whitechapel fiend. Chief Crowley said that it 
would be absolutely impossible for one murder of this sort to go un- 
detected, let alone nearly a dozen. He " was confident " that the de- 
tective force of San Francisco would certainly run down the perpe- 
trator were he to locate here and begin slaughtering and dissecting. 
Hardly a fortnight elapsed after this interview had been published 
when Joseph Hayes, a sailor boarding-house keeper, was shot and 
killed in a saloon at the corner of Montgomery and Washington 
streets. Five or six men were in the saloon and must have seen the 
murder committed, yet to this day Crowley's detectives, who he 
thought could easily catch the insane fiend in Whitechapel, are un- 
able to say who killed Hayes. This is the more remarkable when it 
is remembered that one of Crowley's police force, Sergeant Langford, 
was in the place when Hayes was killed. 

But perhaps, after all, it was an ''Eastern crook" who killed 
Hayes, and may be it was a Mott street Chinaman who stabbed 
Policeman Osgood; and who knows but that an " Eastern crook " 
was responsible for the death of Henry Benhayon. This is the only 
reasonable avenue through which Crowley can escape. 

Charles Meinecke & Co., sole agents for the Pacific Coast for Gold 
Lac Sec Champagne, have issued a neat calendar, consisting of rib- 
boned cards. 

Mr. Jinks— I don't know how you will feel about it, sir, but the 
fact is that my wife, your daughter, is a dreadfully har